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    During our recent annual AZ winter visit, we stayed at View Point Resort in Mesa. Upon plugging in we noticed no power. After checking the pedestal, my husband discovered an open neutral which allowed 220 to flow into our coach. This had blown out some of our electronics. We immediately called the office and their head maintenance person was sent over. He confirmed that there was bad wiring and told us to call a repair service he recommended and that the park would pay for damages. A week later when everything was fixed through major efforts on the part of the repair service, we submitted our bill. They took our information and we left. Several weeks later we received notification from their insurance carrier stating they felt they were not liable, because they didn't know about the bad wiring. We appealed this decision and were again denied coverage. The bill came to over $3,600.00. Our insurance ended up paying except for our $500 deductible, which now puts a mark against us. This is a very upscale park, but when it comes to standing behind their sites, BEWARE!!! This too could cost you.

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    I read with great interest the article on the 2011 Monaco Cayman. It's great to know Navistar has picked up this line as I have always liked the style and features Monaco provided. I have a problem with Monaco's marketing director Ryan Lee"s comment that he and the staff at Monaco think this coach could easily be priced into the $400,000 or $500,000 price range. The article then states "Instead, the Cayman is offered at a base price of $226,350, running up to around $260,000 for a fully tricked-out model". I feel Mr. Lee's remark is what got Monaco into their demise to begin with by pricing their units above reasonable market value. It is almost offensive to think we as motorhome buyers would be willing to pay $400,000 to $500,000 for a $260,000 motorhome as Mr. Lee suggest. I hope as the market regains its credibility, Monaco as well as other motorhome manufacturers keep their pricing where it currently is instead of taking a $260,000 motorhome and re-creating their demise by over-pricing. Many more units will be sold to those of us that would buy a $260,000 motorhome but cannot afford it at $400,000.

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    I have a 2003 National Islander with two Duo Therm heat pumps and have not been happy with the performance of the units. I contacted Holland Motorhomes in San Diego about service on the units and the service writer told me that if the units are low on refrigerant, the units cannot be recharged and will have to be replaced. Not beleiving that Dometic would put out a product that could not be re-charged, I emailed Dometic with that question. Dometic customer service got back to me and without giving any reasns, said they do not recommend re-charging their units and suggested where to buy new units. This sounds like a crock to me! We are able to re-charge the A?C units in our homes and our cars but, can't in our motorhomes? Has anyone had the experience on servicing the Duo Therm heat pumps in their coaches?

  1. I have been very silent here for the last several months, primarily because my wife and I have not had our motorhome out of the driveway since before Thanksgiving. The reason for this very unusual hiatus has been, we have been renovating our primary house. I have often heard that if your marriage can survive such a project, it can survive almost anything, and now I know what they mean.

    This has been one of the most stressful, depressing, maddening experiences of my life. Those of you who have done a major renovation to your stationary home can understand. Those of you who have not had this experience, let me just say that a root canal without anesthesia is a more pleasurable option. We are still having struggles with our heat pump ( I don't know if I can mention the brand name here, but it's a major brand), so I don't know when we will get to go out again. Last weekend, we had the factory rep from the manufacturer out here. Still doesn't work as it should. I don't know what this next weekend will bring, but it probably won't be what I long for most -- a trip into the woods to gather my sanity after more than two months of excursion into insanity.

    Hopefully, though, soon Donna and I will be back on the road, and we'll have lots more to write about. I look forward to that in more ways than one.

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    lrunge1
    Latest Entry

    My wife and I are getting ready to take our coach to Florida for several weeks. I am going to try to keep everyone up to date on our trip. We are planning to stop and take our time. Does anyone have ideas what to see on the way down?

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    Register today for the CAT Club Rally (Caterpillar Engine Owners) at Fort Amarillo RV Park, Amarillo Texas on March 8-12. You will get 4 nights camping, 4 breakfasts, potluck dinner plus 3 catered dinners, excellant entertainment, maintanence seminars, crafts, exploring and a wonderful experiance for all attendees. For more information and to sign up go to www.catrvclub.org and click on Rallies, or call one of our rally masters: Julie and Brent Lauderdale - 580-399-5931 or Kathe and Derrel Letulle - 501-984-3148. See ya at the "Round-up In Amarillo"! :)

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    paul46227@yahoo.com
    Latest Entry

    We are members of the Bounders of America, chapter Mid America Bounders.

    Our chapter meets monthly from May to October. This year we started in Bean Blossom, Indiana.

    So in May we headed to Bean Blossom and stayed at the Bill Monroe campground. It was only a short trip as we live in Indiana.

    But it rained and rained and, I might add, it rained more.

    Campground folks said we had 9 inches of rain in 2 days. Yes ,we got stuck. Coach-Net sent a tow truck to our rescue.

    While in Bean Blossom we visited Brown County and the small town of Nashville. Many old shops and good places to eat.

    Our big surprise came when we visited the sock factory: Bare Feet Originals. They supply socks to many pro sports teams. We now have socks for our right and left feet MARKED.

    In June Nina and I co hosted our rally in Effingham, Il. Our rallies are from Thursday to Sunday. We gathered at Camp Lakewood. It's a very nice, clean and friendly site. As usual, there was tons of good food and we toured many sites in and around Effingham. Great dinner one evening at Niemerg's. Oh, yes, the nightly ice cream runs. Culvers Home wood Grill, and of course Dairy Queen.

    We were doing some work on our home, so we missed the July and August rallies. Hated missing them but things must be done.

    A quick note: We are adding a new patio and deck on the back of our house. Tons of details and planning.

    In September we were in Bridgeton, Ind., a small town 20 miles or so from Terra Haute Ind. We visited the Old County store, enjoyed good food, walked around the town as all the locals were getting ready for the covered bridge festival. They told us that nearly a million people would be there in a few weeks.

    We spent a day with Jerry and Carol driving to many covered bridges.

    October found us in Decatur Ind., at Sullivans RV repair getting some needed but minor things done.

  2. It must first be said it was my yard, my tree, and my motorhome, so I do not know what the big problem was. I was not going to sue myself or call my insurance company to file a claim...

    But when I took Minnie out to have her house batteries checked for the second time in two months (they kept going out due to yet another case of operator error, I learned..), lo and behold, a huge tree branch became attached to her rear ladder. Woven between the rungs, it was. I was not completely surprised, because I had backed her near a tree in the front yard to turn around before exiting the driveway. But, still. It was huge. It was leafy. It was standing straight up, as if I had planted it on the second rung, and then purposefully threaded it upward. I kinda liked it. I was as if Minnie decided she needed to make her own shade.

    I didn't look as if it had scratched anything much on the coach. I thought, She is here for repair, so they can just remove the greenery whilst they are at it. So while I waited for the repair folks to drive her away, the jokes began. One FMCA member couple drove up in a gorgeous, huge Type A and remarked about how much I must like trees. A man who worked at the facility strolled by, giggled, and told me it was "SOME decor!" I laughed with them all. Another even echoed what I had thought: "Decided to make your own shade, did ya??!!"

    Then I got home and realized that while Minnie and the tree were getting acquainted, a huge piece of plastic covering one of her vents had snapped off. I picked it up, ran to the car, drove back to the repair shop, and left it at the pickup counter.

    They tell me they reattached it, and all's well. And I don't leave the house batteries on all the time, anymore, while the coach is just sitting in the driveway. And I almost miss that big 'ol branch.

  3. After leaving Quebec City, we continued our trip south to see friends south of Montreal. Since we were close to the U.S. border, we crossed over to fuel up and for our friends Tom and Louise Butler to pick up their mail. We then crossed by into Canada Via a small blacktop road with a small border crossing. Only one border official was there; he checked us out and we went on our way.

    After we got into Canada, we promply took a wrong turn. With Louise checking the maps, we were able to reach our destination with no problem. The roads were paved but quite narrow, and we crossed one small bridge with a load limit that was marginal at best. Our friends Ray and Francine live at an RV park most to the summer, so that's where we stayed for a few days. While there, the Butlers, Francine and I got in six sets of tennis. The women also got in plenty of cards playing Shanghi.

    From there we drove about an hour to the Ontario boarder, where we met other friends. All of these Canadian friends we met in South Texas over the past several years. Pierre and Daine were gracious hosts with food, wine and tours of the Montreal and the surrounding areas.

    We then traveled southwest along Lake Ontario and lake Erie to Leamington, Ontario. If you read Tom's blog, he gives a good discription of the area and the trip through Windsor and Detroit.

    After we parted with the Butlers, we went to Shipshewana to see the Amish Settlements and visit their shops, etc. While there, we saw a nice museum full of Hudson Cars from their beginnings to the time they quit production. They have probably 50 or more cars mostly restored and some in orginginal condition.

    Next, we went the countryside to see the oldest opperational grist mill. The mill is powered by a water turbine below the building. Plenty of water was flowing -- in fact, the lower level was flooded, so we were not allowed down there.

    Our next stop on our way home was at the Amana villages in Iowa. We parked the coach at a nice little campground next to a motel about 10 miles west of little Amana called Sudbury Court and RV park ... good people and reasonble rates. We spent a day and a half there.

    Laura is a quilter, so we made sure to stop at the fabric and quilt stors. We also stopped at the brewery and one of the winerys and bought a little of both. We visited many of the shops and had dinner at a German restaurant that played Czech Polka music. That caught my ear, as I grew up in a Czech community. We then walked over to the Woolen Mill to watch the looms in action.

    That evening we made a trip by car to Marion, Iowa, next to Cedar Rapids, for a quick vist with my Nephew's family.

    The next morning we left for home, and arrived there on Tuesday evening. We've been home in Yankton now for a couple of weeks. Our time has been spent cleaning up and undloading the RV, washing, waxing, and taking care of our house and lawn. Believe it or not, we also got in a few rounds of golf.

    Our next trek will be to south Texas for the winter.

    It was a great trip!

  4. PREPARE FOR LANDING!

    Hard or soft? Sooner or later? Where? When Cor and I opted for a life on the open road; we envisioned roaming the US at a leisurely pace, pausing long enough to savor the essence of north woods, prairie mountain, mesa, and bayou. Arrival at new campgrounds was exhilarating: so much to learn about the area. There were chutes in Ontario, fossils in Wisconsin. The first sight of the Rockies’ ridgeline at sunset was breathtaking. We had loved meandering by boat; so why not by RV. At least we won’t sink.

    Marina life buzzed with excitement, meeting new people, learning of their ports and sometimes storms. So it was with our early campgrounds; neighbors gathering by the fire, singing songs, exchanging stories. Keep moving, keep learning. Reality set in when the stock market dove. Weekly, even monthly rates were not going to be sustainable. We decided to try the season in Venice, FL, our old hometown. Camp Venice was delightful, under the shade of live oak trees, along a shoot of the Myakka River.

    Visits to our former doctors kind of alerted us to what lay ahead. Mine sent me off with the admonition that falls are the biggest bugaboo to the elderly. (I’m beginning to accept that term.) Cor’s doctor wanted him to return for balance problems, but Cor forgot the appointment.

    We began to write our customary lists of “Pros and Cons.†We love our very comfortable National Dolphin, but it takes dexterity, stamina, and strength to set up, take down, maintain, and maneuver -- especially when you realize you aren’t 60 anymore. As Cor has often said, “If others knew some 90-year-old geezer were tooling down the highway at 70 miles an hour in this beast, they’d probably head for a ditch.â€

    What are the criteria for a landing site? First -- friends, but they, like you, are getting older and can’t be “forever.†Family: We have two families (his and hers.) The majority live in New England -- CT and MA. Another lives in FL and the one we thought we’d be settling near, moved to CO. Somewhere along I-95 would be good for most. Climate: We tolerate cold (in front of the fire) better than heat. Access to medical facilities: Face it! We need them now and will need them more in the future. A town where we could get around without a car. A town with some action, be it music, library, senior gatherings, or just plain sitting in a park to watch the squirrels and listen to the birdies sing.

    Now to find this town of our dreams. Where do we start? Since all our furniture has been stored in Lebanon, New Hampshire, (to be accessible to the daughter who promptly moved to Colorado) and our car and motorhome are registered there, we looked for a campground to take us for the summer while we searched. Ever-reliable Google turned up Exeter Elms, nestled along the banks of the Exeter river, a heavenly mix of hardwoods, evergreens, ferns, chipmunks, and songbirds. Even in this Spring of rain and cold, it provided a serene haven in which to once again “get organized.â€

    Within a week, we began to appreciate what this town has to offer: exquisite architecture (my college major,) a first class hospital, central “downtown,†new library with large print books, senior center (never thought I’d need one,) good supermarkets, walk to many parks as well as the riverfront, an active bandstand, theater groups, concerts, farmer’s market -- you name it! Everybody smiles here. Amazing!

    Again online, we found an apartment plunk in the center of town on the main street overlooking all the action (we’re great watchers now.) We even enjoy the weekends with a steady stream of motorcycles cruising through town on Rt. 27 -- who would have thought?

    If there’s a message here, I guess it is to THINK AHEAD. While you are enjoying your rambling (especially full-timers who have given up a home) keep your eyes open for a good place to land. Make a list of your presumed priorities (they may change with time.) When you are in a town or city, take note of the shopkeepers and people on the street -- are they smiling and helpful? Are drivers pushy, or do they signal for you to enter? You will be calling this “home,†so make it happy.

    We still have the rest of the season at the campsite, but our apartment lease started July 1, so we’ve moved our stored “stuff†down from Lebanon to Exeter. We are taking our time emptying the cavernous bays that carried more "stuff" -- will we ever learn? Now to do the final cleanup here. If anyone is interested in the perfect full-time motorhome, and a prepaid site on the banks of the Exeter River through leaf-peeping season, take a look at our website. Never underestimate the power of the Internet! We found our apartment on Rent.com; found the campsite on Google searches once we’d picked a state to live in; checked out all the tax consequences and medical facilities on various state sites; and still keep in touch with friends and family on Facebook. Call me a wired junkie, all thanks to my Verizon Air Card. It has allowed me to get online almost everywhere. No more eating a hamburger just to get a few free minutes of access at MacDonald’s.

    Click here for photos of the motorcoach at Exeter Elms Campground

    LIFE IS AMAZING, ISN'T IT?

  5. ... and the adventure comes to an end :mellow:

    July 5, day 37: A drive day from Las Cruses, N.M., to Tucson, Ariz. Nothing exciting along the way.

    July 6, day 38: A drive day from Tucson to our home in Cathedral City, Calif., 380 miles on I-10.

    So ends a great 38-day adventure. We drove 6,822 miles and traveled through 14 states. We had set a trip "on the road" budget of $7,600, or $200 per day, for food, fuel and park fees. However, we actually spent $6,900. The savings was in fuel ... we had budgeted $3800 (6 miles per gallon), but we ran at 8 to 9 miles per gallon; hence the savings.

    For RV park fees, we had budgeted $1,900 and spent $1,672, and for eating out the budget was $1,900 and we spent $1,959.

    The trip was a eye-opening experience for us. We did learn that we could live together in a RV for at least 5 weeks and still be talking to each other at the end of the trip. Even Dale the dog is OK, his tail is still wagging :D

    The RV itself did not have any major problems. On the last day of the trip the front air-conditioner unit's squirrel cage did lock up, but that is an easy fix. Other than the AC issue, the RV worked as it should.

    When we first walked back into our home, we had "bigness shock" -- the house is only 1,350 square feet, but compared to the RV, which is about 300 square feet, the house is a mansion :) Once back, we had the chore of unloading (ugh <_< ) the motorhome, which will continue tomorrow.

    So long for now. We are deciding where to go next ....

    Dale, Trudy and Doug

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    We are a young family with young children that has been bitten by this wonderful nomadic way of life. We live in south Georgia and are part of a group ( we have yet to come up with a name) that goes RVing together. Our group all has young kids ages 16 - 2 and our children have a blast seeing the world (maybe just the Southeast, so far).

    We recently traveled to Fort Wilderness Campground at Walt Disney World. This campground is awesome for young and young at heart. The kids do not mind leaving the parks and coming back to the campground because there is so much to do. This time we decided to experiment and only go to the parks 3 out of the 6 days we were there. We didn't here one complaint from the tiny people.

    Our next trip will be at Camping on the Gulf , Destin FL. Another great place for famlies. The staff is great and it is the only place I know that if you step out of you camper you are on the beach. White sand, outlet shopping, cooking out with friends, what could be better. :lol:

    We would love any suggestions from you experts out there on trips we could take with our children and our group.

    For now,

    Northlake 35

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    Just A Hi from Ron and Carol. As soon as we get our Coach back from having some necessary maintenance done we are going to hit the road for a couple of months. Looking forward to making new friends on our journey.

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    eisenee@aol.com
    Latest Entry

    We have been to the Escapade in Sedalia, MO, completed family affairs in Missouri and are now heading for Washington state to begin our second sail in the San Juan Islands. And our first in the Canadain Gulf Islands. We will be meeting up with almost twenty other Montgomery sailboats.

  6. Who would have thought? A RV dealer that is actually standing by the product he sells. At least he made me happy.

    Now that the coach is home again it is time to look at some preventative maintenance. I created a checklist of things that need to be done soon. The list looked like this:

    • Wash, wax, polish the coach

    • Change all fluids

    o Engine oil

    o GenSet oil

    o Coolant

    o Brake fluid

    o Tranny fluid

    o Diff fluid

    o Leveling Jacks

    o Fresh beer in fridge

    • Check if the coach got Daylight Running Lights

    • Aim head lights

    • Winterize

    I was not in a rush to get the stuff done. I want to do as much myself as I can. I start my to do list with washing and polishing. I took the coach to a local RV wand wash. It took me $60 to get the coach washed. Now I drove back to my storage place and start the polish part of the job. I have no idea what to use but after checking around at RV.net and IRV2.com I settled for NuFinish.

    So there I am. 1,000,000 square feet to polish on a nice Saturday morning in October. I am armed with NuFinish and rag’s. Motorhome, here I come. I start my adventure on the roof. I figure if I do the roof first I know it is clean and all the run off should be clean. The roof on my HR Vacationer is a 2 piece Aluminum roof. I simply assume that my NuFinish will do a good job up there. Up to the roof I go. For the age of the coach (it’s a 2002) the roof looks very very very good. No dirt or tree sap at all. I start my Job on the front cap. Wipe on, wipe off, wipe on, wipe off. After around a quarter of wiping on and off I had enough. I NEED A POWER POLISHER. I jump into the car and off to the closes Canadian Tire. Found a 10’’ Orbital polisher for sale for $20, good enough for me.

    While on the roof I noticed that the joint sealing tape is coming loose on the edges and corners. I am sure that this is not Ethernabond that Monaco is using here. For now I will just use some Dicor and seal everything off. Next time I am up here I will start replacing the tape they use with Ethernabond. With the Polisher it took me 3 hours to get the roof done. Cleaned polished and sealed. I now move to the side walls of the coach. It took me the rest of the on Saturday and most Day on Sunday to get the coach polished up. This was the longest it ever took me to polish anything. By the time I had the polish job done I was beat. BUT it looked good.

    I used the generator for 2 days to do the polishing. I noticed that the generator got around 250h on the clock. I thing that is actually not to bad for a 7 years old unit. The entire coach only got 17,000 miles on the clock to the unit was definitely not used a lot by the previous owner. I decided that I should give the generator an oil change before I got home. I went to a local Cummins shop and got me filter. To my surprise the filter was only $7. One more thing done on my check list.

    We did one last trip for Thanksgiving. After that weekend it was time to winterize. I checked the owner manual for everything I needed to know. I must say that Holiday Rambler got a great 240 pages owner manual. The manual gives instruction for both methods of winterizing, Blow out the lines or use 5 gal antifreeze. I somehow don’t trust the blow out method. I live in Canada and it gets cold here (in fact we had snow the last 24 hours and it is May 19, 09 today). I am sure there is still water in some low points where the air simply blows over the water. So I choose the antifreeze method. So I start looking around for plumbing antifreeze. RV-store, Home Depot, Rona, Canadian Tire, Wal-Mart all carry the stuff BUT the price difference is huge. I took the cheap stuff at Wal-Mart and just to make sure I got 7 gal of pink.

    Totally motivated I head out to the coach. And start winterizing. I actually have the owner manual open for this. Point 1 of the manual instructs me to remove the in line water filter. Of cause by the time I am at point 16 no clue what point 1 was. So I hook up the antifreeze and open the kitchen faucet. Of cause I did not remove the water filter. The filter was only 2 trips old. Darn another $60 down the drain.... literally. Ohh well, I finished my winterizing project without any more problems. I used just over 6 gal of the pink stuff. Now I was planning to do an oil change on the engine.

    Now I continued my Maintenance Adventure and my brake fluid. There is a lot written online about Brake failure on the Workhorse W22 chassis. I had never done this before so I used the trusted Internet to find the information I needed. I choose FORD DOT 3 brake fluid. I chose to use the Ford fluid because it got the highest wet boil point of the DOT 3 fluids I found. I spend an other $20 on a vacuum pump. I clean out as much of the old fluid for my reservoir and refill with the new DOT 3. From there I went under the coach starting with the rear pumping out the old fluid making sure there is always enough new stuff in the reservoir so I will not get any air into the lines. This entire project took me less than 2 hours.

    By this time, it was time to start hibernating. If was already November. And camping season was definitely over. So I am putting my coach to rest for the winter.

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    stanstaniforth@msn.com
    Latest Entry

    24-foot Itasca Navion, diesel, Class C

    Bev Vernon and Stan Staniforth; a retired team, she from the Academic field, City Univ.- Bellevue, WA and Stan from B.O.A.C. Montreal, Canada and Alitalia Air, San Francisco and Seattle,The Amer. Red Cross and Disaster Services. Both heavy into volunteering: Stan at the Issaquah Salmon Hatchery Lake Sammamish State Park and a transcriber for the Secretary of State, State of Washington , genealogical records archive. Bev serves her church in Financial Records and we both dote over our two little g-daughters.

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    Well, Betty and I have finished packing most of the rig for the upcoming trip to Idaho. We'll finish the rest the day before we leave. For those who have RVs, you can appreciate that loading and unloading is a royal pain in the A--!! especially if you're going to be gone for any length of time. Invariably you forget something and end up buying it along the way. That means when you get home you've got two or three of the same thing at the house.

    We leave home on May 5th. According to Google, it's 2,082 miles to destination and we plan 10 days en route with sightseeing. We'll be traveling thru TX, CO, WY, and UT. I spent a whole day on the computer flight planning this puppy and finally converted all info to an Excel spreadsheet.

    One thing I realized after the plan was done is that 10 days isn't enough time to see everything at a laid-back pace. So we're going to have to skip a few things so we won't be worn out by the time we get there.

    I was surprised to find that there are plenty of Flying J truck stops along the way with good prices for diesel. Unfortunately, Blue Bell Ice Cream isn't distributed that far north. There will be a withdrawal period. :rolleyes:

    We'll update our information on this blog with pictures and stuff if we have net connections.

    Rich and Betty

    (AKA: Ace and Boop)

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    We were camping this weekend in our 2006 Coachmen motorhome that we purchased about two months ago. We have had problems with it. This weekend we were camping at Turning Wheel RV Center in Ocala, Fla. My husband got locked in the motorhome for about two hours. We were camping with the Florida Ramblers. All of our friends could not get him out. Camping RV Center has a service department right as you come in the camping area. My husband drove up to service and they were able to get him out. We were so pleased with Kara and Keith. They were the best. We wanted everyone to know about them.

  7. Well, we're all set. My surgery is going to be on Monday, and as one of my friends states, we're doing it the RV way. Where we live is about two and a half hours from Atlanta, and Charlotte, North Carolina, is about four hours. So when the folks in Atlanta were dragging their feet, we switched to a doctor in Charlotte. So far it seems to have been an outstanding move. There were two major considerations. One was that we have a rough agenda laid out for our summer trip. Second (maybe the most important) was that the doctor in Charlotte does a lot of these surgeries.

    For people willing to drive a few hours to see a scenic site, or eat at a locally acclaimed restaurant, a trip to Charlotte for a doctor is nothing. Maybe this RV thing really does get into your blood and you think nothing of driving off into the sunset.

    Leaving-the-nest day is going to be either the ninth or 1oth of April, so at that point, we should be posting daily and, if I can figure out how to do it, posting some photos.

    See you down the road.

  8. RV Camping in Mountains and Near Lakes

    By Bob and Pam Stephens

    North Central Arkansas is composed of Ozarks (meaning “rounded hillsâ€) with three large lakes: Bull Shoals

    http://www.bullshoals.net/ , Heber Lake http://www.heber-springs.com/content/ and Norfork Lake. http://www.lakenorfork.com/ All of the lakes are great for boating activities, and all kinds and fishing. While you are in the area, check out Hand Cove Resort and RV Park http://www.handcoveresort.com/index.htm on Lake Norfork! The White River flows out of the Dam just below Bull Shoals. Bull Shoals-White River State Park is a wonderful Arkansas State Park; a must see area, if you can but make reservations early. Near the State Park is a restaurant called Gaston's. http://www.arkansasstateparks.com/park-fin...tours.aspx?id=8 It's great to enjoy the river and have a good meal. Sit by the three-sided glass windows and enjoy your dining experience and views of the White River. The White River area is known for some of the best trout fishing in the country. There is a small airport located at Gaston's, and people fly in from all over the county to fish.

    Near the northern end of the state of Arkansas is the Buffalo River Basin. This is a stunning place http://buffalorivergallery.com/index.php?cat=8 Take a float trip down the Buffalo River. http://www.ozarkmtns.com/buffalo/bfg.html The scenery is great and so is the fishing. Don't come to Arkansas and miss the float trip. Paddling over the course of several hours can be very tiring, so be sure you are up to it! There are several different float trip lengths to choose from! Drive the upper Wilderness area of the Buffalo basin and you will find it is stunning, too. What about a motorbike ride? Grab the Harley because this is a wonderful area for motorcycle riding with curvy roads and great views. Don't miss the town of Jasper off Hwy 7-scenic! http://www.arkansas.com/city-listings/city...ail/city/Jasper It sits in the upper Buffalo wilderness area and there is a wonderful view from the restaurant there, and good cobbler! There are several primitive camping areas in the Buffalo area. If hiking is your thing, this area is a must see. Want to see a campground location for your RV before you pull in? www.campgroundimages.com

    Near the Bull Shoals Lake and Norfolk Lake are some very nice small towns and places to live. Mountain Home is a very nice area situated in the Ozarks, so it is a very pretty area. Mountain Home has golf courses and it is near the Lakes. It is in the north end of the state so the weather in the summer is better than the central or the southern part of the state. Stop by and see the small towns of Yellville and Flippin, Arkansas! Ranger Boats are made there! Yes, there really is a Flippin, Arkansas. http://www.flippinweb.com/

    Traveling east along the north end of the state you will come to Mammoth Springs, which is a very scenic area. The Red river flows here too, which is a great area for fishing and floating. Riverside Park is set on the banks of the Red River. The only drawback for us was traveling on a dirt road for two miles and there is a railroad tracks close by, but it's a very nice grassy RV Park.

    Continuing East and South you will come the Crowley Ridge Area, which is very beautiful http://www.arkansasstateparks.com/crowleysridge/ . If you like to go horseback riding or mountain biking in the Ozarks, this is a must area to come see. This is a great area for hiking, fishing, boating or just taking a nice ride in the car. There are several State Parks in the area to meet your needs as well as Corps of Engineers Parks. Further east of here is the Mississippi Delta area is the town of Jonesboro. It's nice for shopping and dining out.

    Heading South and then back toward the middle of the State you will come to Heber Springs. This is a very popular Lake. It is large and is great for fishing and hunting. It is surrounded by the greenery of the Ozarks. If you're into water and boating this is a must. North of Heber Springs is the town of Mountain View http://www.ozarkgetaways.com/index.html It a very old town and is known for its folk music. Throughout the year they have folk music and Blue Grass festivals there. http://www.ozarkgetaways.com/things_to_do.html Stop by and spend a few days …you will be in for a real treat!

    Tell them Bob and Pam Stephens, Bob@CamproundImages.com sent you!

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    stevens4957
    Latest Entry

    This is new for me, so if I goof, please let me know.

    We are Ken, Nancy and Katie Too and have decided to "go for it" and hit the road full-time. We have a 40-foot diesel Dutch Star fondly known as "Miss Froggy." We tow a Saturn "tad pole" and have just recently become the proud owners of a three-wheel golf cart which we named "little bit."

    So far we have traveled around South Carolina, Georgia and made short visits to Florida. Starting the 28th of this month, we will be traveling full-time, volunteering at state parks, and since Ken is retired military, we will have access to bases in every state.

    The one big drawback that we see so far is how to get our mail. We have signed up for paperless billing on most everything, but there are still going to be some things that will get mailed. Any suggestions from any of you experienced full-timers?

    I hope to get some photos posted soon.

    For now, thanks for any suggestions.

  9. I just had an experience that has taught me a BIG lesson in dealing with an RV service center. ASK LOTS OF QUESTIONS and dont think for a second that a service center has your best interest at heart. They only have your MONEY at HEART.

    GUESS WHAT? they are not responsible for theft of anything on or in your coach EVEN IF IT IS ATTACHED TO THE DASH OR A PART OF THE DASH!!

    They had my coach a little over a month called me and said it was ready so I went to get it. Paid the bill while it was pulled around went out and hooked up the tower and got in the coach. GEUSS WHAT? There was a hole in the dash. My control panel for the leveling jack system was gone.

    I got the service writer in the coach alond with a couple of other people and the question was asked WAS IT THERE WHEN YOU BROUGHT THE COACH IN? I said of course it was and their reply was more the accussive that it was not there.

    Their sevice technition even said he noticed it was gone but no one ever called me to find out if I knew it was missing.

    Today they finally determined what part I needed ans said they were willing to pay for half since I could not prove it was there when I brought it in. Half of the $360 part.

    This cam from the Service Manager I asked for the owner to call me I got a call from the GM who told me North Trail is not responsible for any theft while in their care or on their property and he wwas making me a fair offer.

    I asked the GM to have the owner of North Trail call me and I was instructed that "HE IS TOO BUSY TO TALK TO ME" "ME" a customer who just gave them my money.

    I own 3 businesses myself and have several employees but, if a customer calls with a complaint I take time to talk and I will tell you there is not a customer worth loosing and the potintial harm they could cause my company especially for less than $200.

    CUSTOMER BEWARE!!!!

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    We had never RVed before but we're adventurous. We did our homework as to what we wanted. We landed in Paris in March 2006,rented a car and gave ourselves 2 weeks to find a RV. We were looking for an Integral (like a smaller class A ). We wanted an inside garage to store a small motorcycle. We found one in 10 days. A 2 yr. old 21FT.Knauss with a Fiat diesel engine. We toured France and Spain until the fall and then bought a brand new 25 Ft. Rapido 996M with a Mercedes engine which we took delivery of in May 2007. To register a vehicle anywhere in the E.U. you need a guarantor from whatever country you make your gateway. You need a copy of his passport, a statement that you rent, reside or otherwise stay there and his permission to use his adress. Then, you register it and get insurance. You have to set up an account with a local bank and deposit money there to cover your pre payment for insurance etc... It takes some getting use to but it isn't so bad. Then you are free to drive anywhere in the E.U. and go to Russia, Turkey, and all ex soviet countries with the regular visas needed for tourists.

    We flew there for 3 months in the summers and 3 months in the falls returning home for summer boating and for winter skiing. Also because summers are too busy there and winters are fairly cold unless you stick to mediterranean areas. Storing in the lay over times was easy enough. we aimed for empty rental spaces in campgrounds in the winters and empty winter storage places in the summer. We booked our flights, then 2 weeks before we started our search made reservations there and then toured again until 2 days before departure and took transportation to the airport and home we went.

    We toured in this fashion for 4 years moving North to South with the seasons and progressively from West to East in a large zig zag.it went something like this: around France till Jun 06, home, back Sept. to see Germany Switzerland Hungary, Tcheck and slovakia,down to Sicily ,storage near RomeNov.to Mar. then Rome up to Britain, storage Glasgow for summer, rest of Britain down to Vienna for the winter,up to All Scandinavian countries to Cape North, then to Oslo for summer the in the fallBaltic ,RussiaByelorussia, Ukrain, Moldova, Bulgaria, Turkey, Serbia, Croatia, Italy again. Back to France, sell off and the end fall 09. We travelled almost every day except for bigger cities an only stayed in campgrounds about 10 times in the whole trip. Highly recommended if history and culture lovers. Castles, churches, mountains, fjords. galore.Never felt threatened. If serious about going, we could advise further by phone etc...

    Now we bought a 42 ft. 2009 DP and will start (you guessed it) Zig Zagging with the seasons north to South moving from East to West about 4 months in the Spring and 4 months in the fall. Home 2 months in summer to boat and 2 months in winter to ski, Holidays and the 6 children and 12 grand children. Life is beautiful. We are blessed.

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    I just read the January FMCA Newsletter. Have you? One article that caught my eye was the one titled -

    Camping fees

    The U.S. Forest Service may change its discount policies pertaining to holders of Senior and Access passes. Read more [/color]>>

    I don't know about you but I worked hard to earn my retirement and part of that was the right to enjoy the National Parks, BLM and National Forest Service campgrounds at a senior rate. As soon as I turned 62 I headed for the nearest National Monument to buy my Golden Age Pass. Six months later my wife turned 62 and we headed to Mt St Helens to get hers. We were proud of those passes and we love and support the National and State Parks. In fact in the last 7 years while full timing we have volunteered at State Parks in four different states: Oregon, California, Arizona and Alaska because we think it is important to support the park system. Now this is just my opinion but I am not real pleased that the Forest Service has turned over most of their campgrounds to private concessioners so they can profit from public lands. But now the Forest Service wants to add to the concessioners profits at our expense. Below is a letter that I sent to Senator Patty Murray from Washington State along with the article from the FMCA newsletter. I think we should all be mad as H--- and make some noise and write our legislators. It says on the back of my Golden Age Pass that I am entitled to a 50% discount at Forest Service campgrounds. What will they take away next?

    Also a big thanks to FMCA for bringing this to our attention.

    If you want to send this to your Senator you can contact them through this web site. http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_info...enators_cfm.cfm

    To: Senator Patty Murray

    The article below is from the FMCA web site, http://www.fmca.com/index.php/motorhome/mo...ome-rights/2929. We have been big supporters of state and national parks and have worked as volunteers at state parks for the last 7 years. Now the U.S. Forrest service has seen fit to put private concessioners above the interest of seniors by changing the term of the Golden Age Pass as noted below. We talk to senior RVers often who are on Social Security and rely on the reduced fees at NPS, BLM and U.S.Forrest service to be able to afford to maintain their RV live stile. This is another take-a-way from seniors who have worked hard all their lives to be able to enjoy retirement. Please help support seniors by helping us retain the benefits promised when we bought our Golden Age Passes.