golfnick

Replacing Shocks

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Bilstein also have a lifetime warranty and I have used it on my older BMW when one failed after 180K miles for some reason. Now I have heard that if a Bilstein or a Koni are installed from the factory and you buy the coach new and one fails they will not honor the warranty because Monaco or whoever bought it first so you are not the original owner. I have never experienced this myself and we all know how urban legends are. You cannot go wrong with either a Koni or a Bilstein and if you buy them new then you have a warranty. I bet you are anyone else cannot tell the difference between them as far as ride which is the way it should be if you are the best.

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wolfe10   

Yes, in direct answer to your question, Bilstein shocks are part of the Roadmaster 4 bag Ride Enhancement Kit from Source Engineering, so a company who has spend a LOT of R&D hours perfecting the 4 bag suspension recommends them: http://www.rv-chassis.com/rek.pdf

But, if the trailing arm replacement has not been done, that WAY outweighs the shock issue. Here is the Source Engineering Trailing Arm link: http://www.rv-chassis.com/tra1003.html

Brett

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jimkate   

I can confirm what Mike Canter says about Bilstein shocks. Our coach rode terribly with the Bilstein shocks. The coach literally pounded when the tires hit those 'bang, bang, bang' joins in the pavement. I ordered new Bilstein shocks last year.

Once removed, the old Bilstein shocks were so stiff that I could not close them without assistance, and once compressed, the shock would return very, very slowly to its full length. The new Bilstein shocks were fairly easy to close, and returned to full length fairly rapidly.

The difference in ride is like night and day. We still feel the 'bang, bang, bang' joins in the pavement, but now it's not knocking the fillings out of our teeth.

Jim Sanderson

1995 Monaco Dynasty 36'

Canada, eh?

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I have a early 2001 Monaco Knight and my shocks are shot. I have 4 OEM Newway CF2978D shocks on the coach.  Bilstein sent me replacement shocks and the bolt holes are 5/8" and I need 3/4" upper and lower. They cant find my shock using my Vin #. Did Monaco change shock set up in that year. Called Monaco and they were no help at all. They said 2001 uses the same shock as the 2002. I just cant believe the shocks would be the same when the 2002 uses 4 shocks per axle and mine uses 2. Would like Bilsteins but might have to look around. Any help locating shocks would be great.

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Call Koni in Kentucky, a far superior shock for this application. They are hydraulic as opposed to gas and some of the applications use a "smart" shock. They are knowledgeable. 

During that time at Monaco they did all kinds of things off the beaten path. At that time they bought Beaver and Safari and then they went under like so many others.

In response to Mikes comment about them being the same I would like to disagree. "B"s were on the Safari Zanzibar I bought initially getting into this  DP world. It did not take long to switch to the Konis and what a change it was! Now PORSCHE and BMW guys will always find a point to disagree on anyway...:lol:

BillE

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I have some info to add to this great thread. After scuffing the front end a few times on my 50K miles 2007 Patriot, I talked to Source Engineering about their tuned Bilsteins.

As a test, I installed four up front. The six in the rear can wait, since they seem okay. Ride dampening is improved.

Some thoughts:

  • Torque values are 220 ft lbs for the larger upper bolt, 150 for the lower bolts. Socket sizes are 1 1/8" for the uppers, 7/8" for the lower nut and 13/16" for the lower bolt head.
  • A mild ream of 11/16" needs to be done on the upper bushings for fit.
  • The saddle accommodating the lower bushing is 1/16" wider, and a washer shim is required.
  • Source Engineering says to disconnect the ride-selection wire at the top of each older shock, secure it. Disconnect the red warning light in the cockpit.
  • Job difficulty is moderate, due to the wrestling part. A bottle jack can raise and lower the frame corner when removing the shock, gently raised until the bottom bolt spins freely, during removal. A slight change is required to align the bolt hole of the incoming new shock.
  • Source instructed me to keep the old, wired shocks. Some of you are apparently hardcore and rebuild them. I have them in stock, if anyone wants to buy them. Two have intact plugs.

 

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