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Air Leak On Back Of Dash Gauge


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#1 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 16 December 2009 - 06:10 PM

When we parked our motorhome in storage the other day, my wife said she could hear some air hissing. Of course, with my bad hearing, and my hearing aids in for repair, I could not hear a thing. (Sometimes I even have selective hearing. Hee hee!) I asked if she could tell me where it was coming from and her mechanical ability said, "From the driver's side." That is as close as she could get.

I asked a friend to stop by and he was able to pinpoint it to the red line coming off the dash gauge. (Hmm! I wonder what other colors there are?). I'm curious to know if anyone can shed some light on this. I suspect I have had this leak for a long time. Are there any temporary fixes until I can get it to Freightliner of Houston?

Thanks.

#2 wolfe10

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Posted 16 December 2009 - 06:37 PM

Wayne,

Get one of your more agile neighbors to crawl around (not under the coach unless blocked up) and determine exactly what is leaking.

Most likely sources are a chafed area on the air line or a fitting that is loose.

We can't give you advice on whether it is safe to drive -- it depends on what line it is AND whether it could "blow out" and lock up the brakes.

Best answer is to repair where it is.

Will send you a Private Message.

Brett Wolfe
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#3 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 16 December 2009 - 10:24 PM

Brett,
Thanks.

My friend said he could feel the air at the back of the dash pressure gauge. He said it was a red colored line.

I don't know if that is a pressure fitting or a nut that can be tightened, or like you said, maybe chaffed.

Thanks.

Answered PM.

#4 hermanmullins

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Posted 17 December 2009 - 07:01 AM

Since it is under the dash and on the pressure guage you know it is a compression fitting. If it were in a place that you could get to easly it would be one of those pressure fittings. I love our motor home, however when they assemble a coach they always seem to put the simple items in simple places and the difficult in difficult places. All mechanics need two more elbows on both arms, long fingers and very flexable every where else.

On a more serious note, when driving my coach I never seem to have a problem with air pressure when I stop and start my engine. But when I leave it overnight I always have to wait for the pressure to build up. Is this normal? Brett? Wayne? Tom? Seajay?
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"Fair winds and Following Seas"

Herman & Bobbie Mullins, F302225
Whitewright, TEXAS
'02 Monaco Dynasty, 40-foot 400 HP ISL
Chevrolet Silverado (M & G air brakes)
U.S. Navy PR-3 1956 to 1964

Southern Region Vice President for Six-State Rally Association
Lone Star Chapter FMCA Past President
South Central Lucky Rollers
Rally in The Pasture


#5 wolfe10

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Posted 17 December 2009 - 09:38 AM

On a more serious note, when driving my coach I never seem to have a problem with air pressure when I stop and start my engine. But when I leave it overnight I always have to wait for the pressure to build up. Is this normal?

Generally speaking, a leak that takes overnight to drain the pressure is within commercially acceptable standards.

But it is also large enough that you should be able to find it with a trusty soapy spray bottle.

Brett Wolfe
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#6 rbdtanasi

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Posted 17 December 2009 - 09:54 AM

I had a leak at the fitting of the air pressure gage. On my coach the air lines all use press-on fittings that work like Chinese handcuffs in that you press the air line into the fitting and then pull back to set it. To remove the air line, use a wrench that just fits over it and press toward the fitting hard while wiggling the air line to release it.

I had to install a new fitting which I got at NAPA.
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#7 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 17 December 2009 - 10:44 AM

Herman,
I agree with Brett that losing air in 24 hours is withing normalcy. However, I have heard others that state they never loose air, even after a month in storage.

rbdtanasi,

I have this theory. If it is my equipment I leave it alone and let someone experienced fix it. If it is some one elses equipment, I'll jump right in and try and fix it. In 99% of the cases where I have helped some one I have been successful. In 99% of the cases where I worked on my own equipment, I failed. Well, except for some of the smaller items. It would be my luck that I would break the air pressure gauge.

#8 hermanmullins

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Posted 17 December 2009 - 10:53 PM

Herman,
I agree with Brett that losing air in 24 hours is withing normalcy. However, I have heard others that state they never loose air, even after a month in storage.

rbdtanasi,

I have this theory. If it is my equipment I leave it alone and let someone experienced fix it. If it is some one elses equipment, I'll jump right in and try and fix it. In 99% of the cases where I have helped some one I have been successful. In 99% of the cases where I worked on my own equipment, I failed. Well, except for some of the smaller items. It would be my luck that I would break the air pressure gauge.

Wayne,
When I was stationed in N.J., I was a crew member for a AA Gas Dragster. We always worked on Friday Nights getting ready for the weekend. The owner, named Joe, could take a 6 foot cheater bar on a half in. bolt and put all of his weight on it without any problems, where as his Brother-in-law Eric could take a open wrench on a three quarter in bolt, and with the lest amount of pressure snap it off. I know the feeling on working on someone elses coach and not your own. I can always diagnose someones problems and fix it but on mine I can stand for hours without helping one bit. So lets start doing this, you fix mine and I'll fix yours.

Herman
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"Fair winds and Following Seas"

Herman & Bobbie Mullins, F302225
Whitewright, TEXAS
'02 Monaco Dynasty, 40-foot 400 HP ISL
Chevrolet Silverado (M & G air brakes)
U.S. Navy PR-3 1956 to 1964

Southern Region Vice President for Six-State Rally Association
Lone Star Chapter FMCA Past President
South Central Lucky Rollers
Rally in The Pasture


#9 hermanmullins

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Posted 17 December 2009 - 10:58 PM

Generally speaking, a leak that takes overnight to drain the pressure is within commercially acceptable standards.

But it is also large enough that you should be able to find it with a trusty soapy spray bottle.

Brett Wolfe


Brett, One of my problems is I don't have a place where I can crawl under the coach. My storage building is rocks and it makes it dificult to lay on your back and move around. OH what I wouldn't give for a concrete floor.

Thanks, Herman
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"Fair winds and Following Seas"

Herman & Bobbie Mullins, F302225
Whitewright, TEXAS
'02 Monaco Dynasty, 40-foot 400 HP ISL
Chevrolet Silverado (M & G air brakes)
U.S. Navy PR-3 1956 to 1964

Southern Region Vice President for Six-State Rally Association
Lone Star Chapter FMCA Past President
South Central Lucky Rollers
Rally in The Pasture


#10 wolfe10

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 01:23 PM

Brett, One of my problems is I don't have a place where I can crawl under the coach. My storage building is rocks and it makes it difficult to lay on your back and move around. OH what I wouldn't give for a concrete floor.

Thanks, Herman

Sounds like a mall parking lot has your name on it early on a Sunday morning! Bring those jack stands/wood blocks for safety stands.

Brett Wolfe
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#11 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 18 December 2009 - 03:30 PM

Hey! That goes for everyone. You fix mine, I'll fix yours.

I have the option of saying no thank you.

I do know my limits.

#12 vrjano

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 12:50 PM

Had a similar problem on our new 2008 Winnebago with a Freightliner chassis. Air would leak down in about 8 to 10 hours. My wife heard air under dash one day. Upon checking, I found that one of the two air gauges had a crack in the plastic housing that held the "Chinese handcuff" type brass fitting. Had to replace the entire gauge. After repair, air now will hold indefinitely when stored.
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#13 bruceshanks

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 01:59 PM

Sounds like a mall parking lot has your name on it early on a Sunday morning! Bring those jack stands/wood blocks for safety stands.

Brett Wolfe



A large sheet of cardboard does wonders for smoothing out the gravel.

Bruce Shanks
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#14 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 08 January 2010 - 08:14 PM

vr,
That is what the problem was with my 2008, cracked gauge. Apparently this is a problem with some of the Freightliner chassis models. When I talked to the tech it was indicated that they had some problems with the gauges. Fortunately the compressor was able to keep up with the demand. Technician also stated that the worse case scenario was to pull the line and plug it until you could get to a service center. I did not find that to be my need but I kept a close eye on it.

With the colder, below freezing, temperatures here for the next couple days I brought the coach home to plug into 50 amp and filled up the propane to run the furnace. In a 24 hour period I have used 1/3 tank of propane, running at 65 degrees. Nice and toasty - almost. I'm stating this because of this next statement. As I was coming around the block to the house I all of a sudden heard this Pppppssssssssssssss! I immediately started checking the gauges, but they were holding steady at 125 psi. After I had it in the driveway, I was concerned so I asked my wife to step in. I said, "Do you hear that!" She responded, "It's the radio." Somehow the radio had come on and was "off" station and causing that PPpppsssssssss I was hearing.

Well, I do have selective hearing, but that one had my attention.

#15 lylefikse

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 12:18 PM

Had this same problem with the guage cracked. I stuck a pin in the crack to open it up a little and filled it with super glue. So far so good. Have 500 miles and 4 months since the repair and still holding.
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#16 wolfe10

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 12:23 PM

Trusting super glue to seal a crack in a 120 PSI air system has a good likelihood of leaving you on the side of the road. If you leave it that way, be sure to carry parts to temporarily block off that line if the gauge fails.
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#17 desertdeals69

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 10:10 PM

It depends on the "super glue". Some car and truck door hinges are glued on and not welded or bolted. I saw a door almost get ripped off and the hinges just bent, the glue held tight. I would, however replace the gauge.
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#18 TBUTLER

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 05:21 PM

A large sheet of cardboard does wonders for smoothing out the gravel.

Bruce Shanks


I have carried two pieces of cardboard cut from the side of appliance boxes since we went full time. They ride on top of the "stuff" on my slide tray. They are great for getting under the coach anywhere, rest areas, roadsides, campgrounds, etc. I use two so I can get on one and pull the next ahead of me and move anywhere under the coach. I've done a variety of repairs and adjustments over the years and always find the cardboard handy. When they get worn out or too dirty, I simply replace then with another set. Several years ago we were coming out of the Tetons. I was following a truck with a trailer load of firewood. One stick fell off and as we passed over it it clipped the exhaust pipe on the generator. I could hear it tinkling along, dragging on the road. I pulled out at a historical marker. Underneath I found the pipe had just been popped off the stub from the generator. I loosened the clamp, slipped the pipe back on the stub and tightened the clamp securely. We were back on our way in a matter of minutes and all I had to do was wash my hands. I didn't have to change clothes!
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After 9 1/2 years full time in our motor home and being Winter Texans we are now living at Sandpipers Resort in Edinburg, Texas. Now we are Summer Chickens!

"The tipi is much better to live in; always clean and warm in winter, cool in summer, easy to move... If the Great Spirit wanted men to live in one place he would have made the world stand still." -- Flying Hawk, South Dakota Oglala Sioux


#19 hermanmullins

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 07:11 PM

Brett,
I posted on December 17, 2009, "Oh what I wouldn't give for a concrete floor". I now have a 50 foot wide by 40 foot deep metal building with a concrete floor. Now all I need are some really big jack stands so I can crawl under the coach. I am too nice of a fellow to be crushed by a 40 footer.

Herman
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"Fair winds and Following Seas"

Herman & Bobbie Mullins, F302225
Whitewright, TEXAS
'02 Monaco Dynasty, 40-foot 400 HP ISL
Chevrolet Silverado (M & G air brakes)
U.S. Navy PR-3 1956 to 1964

Southern Region Vice President for Six-State Rally Association
Lone Star Chapter FMCA Past President
South Central Lucky Rollers
Rally in The Pasture


#20 desertdeals69

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 07:52 PM

My home garage is 32x64, 2 story tall, with cement floor and I have 4 jack stands for the motorhome. When I'm on the road I carry a couple of pieces carpet to lay on. I roll them up and put them in the back of my pickup truck that I tow.
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