MWeiner

Fuel Economy-- Was This A Primary Consideration?

35 posts in this topic

Let's face it,  us Class B owners purchased a smaller rig and on a square footage basis,  these things are very expensive units .... sometimes cost between $100,000 to $150,000 brand new.    And, we are giving up space for extra fuel economy,  my average mileage is 18 MPG.   

But,  we have increased mobility,  ease of parking and more accessible to smaller parks.    Some National Parks won't allow rigs over 40 feet. 

So,  if you drive 100,000 miles that's $16,665 or 5,555 gallons of  diesel fuel based on an average $ 3 per gallon.    

Compare that to a 40 foot rig getting 5 MPG,   the same 100,000 miles would 20,000 gallons of diesel fuel at $3 per gallon or  $60,000 .   

That's a difference of $43,335...   very significant.   

SO,  was this a huge factor for you??,  it was for me. 

Please share your thoughts.  

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If you are asking whether MPG is a primary consideration FOR US-- no way.

If a coach will not fulfill our needs, MPG is irrelevant.

Clearly, I would not suggest that want is important to us is or should be important to anyone else!

We are very much a 6-4-2 coach owner: Coach must comfortably "drink 6, eat 4 and sleep 2".

Have considered downsizing, but if a coach can't do those numbers no amount of fuel savings could make it the right coach for us.

With that said, we monitor every gallon that goes in the coach.  But more to give early warning signs of a mechanical issue than because we are considering looking for something that gets much better mileage but will not fit OUR needs.

Yes, earlier in our RV'ing life we traveled Europe in a VW pop top camper.  It fit our needs at that time and in the low 20's for MPG.

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100,000 miles takes the average RVer at least 10 years to accomplish.  That's only $6000/year vs. the cost of the RV in the $200,000 to $500,000 range.  Since you are not a class A buyer you can't really compare any Class A or Class C (especially Super C) numbers to anything you could relate to in your van conversion.

I must say that you are likely the most prolific new member we have seen on this site in a very long time.  225 posts since July 3rd.

 

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4 hours ago, MWeiner said:

Let's face it,  us Class B owners purchased a smaller rig and on a square footage basis,  these things are very expensive units .... sometimes cost between $100,000 to $150,000 brand new.    And, we are giving up space for extra fuel economy,  my average mileage is 18 MPG.   

But,  we have increased mobility,  ease of parking and more accessible to smaller parks.    Some National Parks won't allow rigs over 40 feet. 

So,  if you drive 100,000 miles that's $16,665 or 5,555 gallons of  diesel fuel based on an average $ 3 per gallon.    

Compare that to a 40 foot rig getting 5 MPG,   the same 100,000 miles would 20,000 gallons of diesel fuel at $3 per gallon or  $60,000 .   

That's a difference of $43,335...   very significant.   

SO,  was this a huge factor for you??,  it was for me. 

Please share your thoughts.  

Your van conversion needs to get over 30 mpg to equal my 36 ft which gets 10 mpg but is comfortable for 6 people.

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2 hours ago, wolfe10 said:

Primary consideration-- no way.

If a coach will not fulfill our needs, MPG is irrelevant.

We are very much a 6-4-2 coach owner: Coach must comfortably "drink 6, eat 4 and sleep 2".

Have considered downsizing, but if a coach can't do those numbers no amount of fuel savings could make it the right coach for us.

With that said, we monitor every gallon that goes in the coach.  But more to give early warning signs of a mechanical issue than because we are considering looking for something that gets much better mileage but will not fit OUR needs.

Yes, earlier in our RV'ing life we traveled Europe in a VW pop top camper.  It fit our needs at that time and in the low 20's for MPG.

Hi Brett,  

if it were not for the extra armoire cabinets ( optional that came with our coach), that we installed we could have  4 people eat and  seat four people up front plus, there's room to seat another three in the back. for a grand total of 7 passengers..  

We  don't  use it this way. Just the two of us....

 We do spend time outside as well.. 

As it is a diesel, I expect that it will be probably good for 150,000 miles or more. It's a little more luxurious than a VW camper.. I definitely know what those are.  

This is pretty quiet and handles well... Not bad on the pickup either and holds its own climbing hills. 

---Mark

 

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1 hour ago, desertdeals69 said:

Your van conversion needs get over 30 mpg to equal my 36 ft which gets 10 mpg but is comfortable for 6 people.

OK, how's that exactly??   Why 30 MPG? 

Just as a point of information....

My van is 23 feet long.. We could take out the two front armoire cabinets put in the extra bucket seats behind the driver and passenger with two or three in the back.?    

This discussion was aimed at Class B owners, but, I appreciate your input.

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2 hours ago, BillAdams said:

100,000 miles takes the average RVer at least 10 years to accomplish.  That's only $6000/year vs. the cost of the RV in the $200,000 to $500,000 range.  Since you are not a class A buyer you can't really compare any Class A or Class C (especially Super C) numbers to anything you could relate to in your van conversion.

I must say that you are likely the most prolific new member we have seen on this site in a very long time.  225 posts since July 3rd.

 

Bill - yes, I'm merely pointing out that the group of Class Bs... made a conscious choice to have a lighter foot print and get the better fuel economy... that's all..

The advantage of this is the higher mobility at a fraction of the fuel consumption..this have to be compared to something... It is what it is. 

My cost of going 10,000 miles is only $1,665 per year. That is almost what you might find in an SUV.. 

There's plenty of Class A'S selling brand new that are "gasoline engines" under $100,000.  

The Roadtrek RS Adventurous sells for $150,000 brand new... I was very lucky to find a clean used one for half this price.  

Even with the price of the coach and the fuel, and some repairs, I don't think I'll hit the $150,000 mark driving 100,000 miles... that's my point. 

Yes, as far as the number of posts.... you get as much as you put into the club...

---Mark

 

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Where would you sleep 6?  My point is that we can travel comfortably with six and get 10 mpg.  You travel with 2 and get only 18 mpg.

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Never said anything about sleeping 6 people... only that we could carry 7 passengers.. like on a day trip.. 

It only sleeps 2 people...king size bed in the back...

There's an option..I wouldn't do this, but, you can get the front seats to fold down into two single beds... SO, if you had small kids,  I suppose you could do that and they would sleep up front... pretty small quarters though...

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Anybody who is primarily concerned with fuel usage is in the wrong hobby.  I have to chuckle when a read a post about traveling and a poster says he's not going because fuel went up a quarter/gallon.  So when he's on his death bed is he going to say, "man I'm glad I didn't make that Yellow Stone Park trip, look at the money I saved" or is he going to say, "I'm sure glad I spent a few bucks and got to see YS park, sure was pretty."  IMHO, the biggest disadvantage of a Class B is that when ever you go some place from the CG you have to pack up your RV and go in it.  Then when you get home, you have to set up again.  We spend every Jan in one CG on the Gulf Coast....it would be a real PITA in a Class B.

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FIVE. You said it all. We don't worry that much about fuel mileage, we worry about which thing to do on conflicting dates, or can we really make it between pt A and pt B in the driving time we have available. Our kids loved Yellowstone in our RV. 

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13 hours ago, FIVE said:

Anybody who is primarily concerned with fuel usage is in the wrong hobby.  I have to chuckle when a read a post about traveling and a poster says he's not going because fuel went up a quarter/gallon.  So when he's on his death bed is he going to say, "man I'm glad I didn't make that Yellow Stone Park trip, look at the money I saved" or is he going to say, "I'm sure glad I spent a few bucks and got to see YS park, sure was pretty."  IMHO, the biggest disadvantage of a Class B is that when ever you go some place from the CG you have to pack up your RV and go in it.  Then when you get home, you have to set up again.  We spend every Jan in one CG on the Gulf Coast....it would be a real PITA in a Class B.

I hope you realize that I posted this question under the Class B forum? 

For your information, we are planning on traveling through the entire USA and Alaska with our Class B..  we don't have any problem leaving a complete set of clothes that we leave in our rig 24/7... 

And, we go everywhere a Class A or C goes, maybe more places a really big rig can't even get into! 

And, because we're getting the higher MPG, it's LESS of an issue to make a long distance trip or go virtually anywhere. It's much more liberating, no excuses not to go. 

Boondocking is easier, we blend into parking lots and look more stealth than either a Class A or C... 

We have a small teardrop trailer....now, that's a little more challenging to travel during inclement weather and packing that up is a PITA.. the conversion van is very easy... 

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I'm sure there must be other van conversion owners that are members or FMCA but apparently they don't participate in the forum. Mark, fuel mileage must have been the driving force for your van purchase. Comfort was the reason for my class A purchase, to each his own. Hopefully another van conversion owner will join your conversation.

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45 minutes ago, Elkhartjim said:

I'm sure there must be other van conversion owners that are members or FMCA but apparently they don't participate in the forum. Mark, fuel mileage must have been the driving force for your van purchase. Comfort was the reason for my class A purchase, to each his own. Hopefully another van conversion owner will join your conversation.

Jim, that would be very nice....so far, I'm getting a lot of people making comments about their Class A's.... I definitely know they are bigger than my rig...  I'm just saying that I can go anywhere you guys go in the Class A group and be totally comfortable..  

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Just as an added piece of information... Mike and Jennifer Wendlend travel all across the USA and he writes blogs on living in his Class B Roadtrek.. 

Where's the people in the FMCA who do this...? 

And, why aren't they contributing to the forum?? I think I know why.. but would rather not say it....

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Looked up the new owners of Roadtreck today...Hymer Group...Did not know that Roadtreck is a Canadian Company, did know that Hymer is German and has been in the RV business since 1956.  The Hymer would be a perfect Toad, Fiat chassis and gas or MB diesel.  I would chose the gas version! (Dodge engine), serviced anywhere! :D 

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43 minutes ago, manholt said:

Looked up the new owners of Roadtreck today...Hymer Group...Did not know that Roadtreck is a Canadian Company, did know that Hymer is German and has been in the RV business since 1956.  The Hymer would be a perfect Toad, Fiat chassis and gas or MB diesel.  I would chose the gas version! (Dodge engine), serviced anywhere! :D 

Yes, Roadtrek is part of the Hymer group.. I didn't know that Hymer was started in 1956.. good to know.... Roadtrek was started in 1974 and they're one of the leading makers of Class Bs since 1990...  I was aware that they merged.... Good call. 

As far as engines go, I'd rather have the diesel... reason being, it's quieter.. gets better fuel economy and it doesn't work as hard going up hills.. just me. 

Never been a big Dodge fan.. they've got a terrible reputation with their cars...

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Hmmm, Hymer, Hummer, I'll take the latter, more room for four yorkies. It's a must for a six sleeper for us. :rolleyes:LOL! Poorer fuel mileage also.

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Kay, the original Hummer for me!  :lol:

Fiat, MB, Dodge, Jeep, Rolls Roy's, Bugatti=Daimler.  Ugh.

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5 hours ago, gulya said:

FIVE. You said it all. We don't worry that much about fuel mileage, we worry about which thing to do on conflicting dates, or can we really make it between pt A and pt B in the driving time we have available. Our kids loved Yellowstone in our RV. 

What you're saying is.... you're a Class B...how can you appreciate RVing....how can you justify that? 

We love Yellowstone just as much as the rest of you....we can enjoy this just as much in our Class B... 

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This discussion is ill considered on the part of all parties.  We all have reasons for choosing the type of motor home we have purchased.  There is no reason that we all have to have the same type of motor home.  Nor does someone choosing a different type of motor home constitute an insult to those who have other types of motor homes.

Louise once told me that her idea of roughing it was spending a night in a Holiday Inn.  When we went shopping for a motor home we chose a Class A.  I've managed to keep her happy in a motor home for 16 years now. 

Louise and I have at times made adjustments in our travels.  We almost always try to limit the miles we travel to save money.  That means we plan our summer travels so we aren't driving willy-nilly all over the country.  Sometimes it works better than others but it has always been our habit to avoid back and forth trips.  We use Gas Buddy to find the cheapest fuel and I have a credit card that gives me 5% cash back on fuel purchases at any gas station (Kroger, Safeway and Costco are exceptions).  During the years of the highest prices we tended to stay longer in campgrounds and travel less often.  That works great for places like Yellowstone.  A person could easily spend a month at Yellowstone if they wanted to see it all.  Making cavalier statements about people owning motor homes not caring about the price of fuel is not honest or helpful.  If you are truly that rich, you are boasting, not a noble trait.

Several years ago we traveled to New Zealand and Australia.  We spent four months touring those two countries in a very small Class C.  It had the sleep-over cab but in all other respects it was the same as a Class B motor home.  As we traveled, we realized that all the things we were used to doing when traveling in the US in our Class A had prepared us very well for the extended experience in this smaller motor home.  By the way, we saw 1 Class A motor home in New Zealand and we saw 1 Bus Conversion in Australia.  Everything else is Class B or C or the much more common trailer. 

The rental motor home was affordable for us, it fit our travel perfectly.  We seldom spent more than two nights in one place.  The set up consisted of putting it in park.  The take down consisted of putting it in drive.  If we needed to shop for something we did it on the way from one location to another.  We could park in the grocery store parking lots which were in some cases difficult in even the small Class C.  Fuel was in the $2 per liter range for diesel fuel and we were getting 16 miles to the gallon with the diesel engine.  We were very happy about that.  Yes, I can do the conversions and they are correct, in both quantity and distance for fuel and in the currency conversion as well. 

My point is that just because you have an RV that suits your needs doesn't mean that everyone has to have the same RV.  Let's face it, if everyone purchased just one kind of RV, manufacturers wouldn't offer so many different kinds.  This is the USA, we live in a country where if you can find a few hundred people who want to purchase something, someone will manufacture it and it will be on the market. 

Some of us remember the standard black telephone.  When the monopoly was broken, we started seeing phones in different colors, smaller phones, wall phones, Princess phones, portable phones, flip phones, smart phones, who knows where it will end.  The French have a saying, "vive la difference."  Long live the difference!  Now let's get on with it and start trying to be helpful to each other.  It's what families do.

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As it is a diesel, I expect that it will be probably good for 150,000 miles or more. It's a little more luxurious than a VW camper.. I definitely know what those are.  

This would be true for a gas engine as well so you also have to compare the high cost of diesel fuel vs. gas cost and the MPG of a diesel vs MPG of a gas.  Diesel is often $0.60/gallon more expensive than gas so a diesel engine is not necessarily a money saving option as you can't make up the cost difference with the possible fuel mileage gain.

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12 hours ago, FIVE said:

Anybody who is primarily concerned with fuel usage is in the wrong hobby.  I have to chuckle when a read a post about traveling and a poster says he's not going because fuel went up a quarter/gallon.  So when he's on his death bed is he going to say, "man I'm glad I didn't make that Yellow Stone Park trip, look at the money I saved" or is he going to say, "I'm sure glad I spent a few bucks and got to see YS park, sure was pretty."  IMHO, the biggest disadvantage of a Class B is that when ever you go some place from the CG you have to pack up your RV and go in it.  Then when you get home, you have to set up again.  We spend every Jan in one CG on the Gulf Coast....it would be a real PITA in a Class B.

I am concerned with fuel milage.  I want to get the best milage for what I am comfortable driving.  I have added another 90 gal fuel tank, when I filled it my total gallonage was 186.  At 10 mpg that gives me least a 1600 mile range leaving plenty of reserve.  I also carry 96 gallons of fuel in my toad which is a 1/2 ton Silverado.  I use gas buddy for the cheapest fuel and generally go to the station with the truck as a lot of times you would have hard time maneuvering a motorhome. This allows me to seek the least expensive fuel in the country.

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12 hours ago, MWeiner said:

Just as an added piece of information... Mike and Jennifer Wendlend travel all across the USA and he writes blogs on living in his Class B Roadtrek.. 

Where's the people in the FMCA who do this...? 

And, why aren't they contributing to the forum?? I think I know why.. but would rather not say it....

You ask where they are.  The FMCA Road Trek Chapter has 2500 members, so clearly there are a number of Class B owners active in FMCA:

http://www.roadtrekchapter.org/

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