Lunchbkt1

Towing A Buick Enclave

6 posts in this topic

I am towing a Buick Enclave behind my coach. The coach has a full-width mud flap.

I am noticing fine chips in the windshield of the Enclave, which I suspect are the result of gravel, etc. coming up from the coach.

I am looking for a protective bra that would cover my Buick Enclave's front end, from the bumper up over the windshield.

Anyone have an idea where I might find this sort of protection?

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Before we went to Alaska in 2006, we stopped by Coastline Cover Company in the Los Angeles area. They outfitted us with a bra for both our Windsor and Trailblazer. They made templates of both as they hadn't previously done either of these vehicles. We have used the bra for the toad ever since. We also have the Roadmaster Guardian shield in addition to our full width mud flap as well as individual mud flaps on each wheel position. Being a toad is not an easy life!

I will say that one of the problems we have with a bra, both the toad and the motor home bra, is that they do chafe the paint. Given our constant life on the road, this is a problem. I still use the bra on the toad as I think the chafing of the paint is less serious than the paint and windshield chips that come from rocks.

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I tried the Coastline Bra for our '98 Cutlass. I found it required two people several minutes to stretch it over the car. The car needs to be clean and dry before you put the bra on. It also takes up a lot of room when not in use. For those 3 reasons, I'm not a fan of them.

The various designs of mudflaps across the back of motorhomes may stop some debris from being thrown on your towed vehicle. BUT, they also create a low pressure that picks-up all sorts of stuff off the road and allows it to be thrown on you towed vehicle. Get up close to a big truck and the same thing happens. Mudflaps - either solid or brushes are almost useless.

The Roadmaster "Guardian" is heavy and more cumbersome than I'd like to deal with and it's bulky to store. I see they now offer a "Tow Defender" to complement the Guardian. It's probably worthwhile. Protect Your Towed Vehicle and RV Against Dings and Rock Chips.

I recently purchased the "Protect-A-Tow" before coming to Florida just after Christmas and it seems to be the thing I've been looking for. It mounts under the towbar on eyebolts across the rear of the motorhome and front of the towed vehicle using snap hooks. Installation & removal is quick and easy. It's very light and stores in a small bag about a 1/4 of the size of the bra. It stops everything from bouncing up behind the motorhome from side to side. That said, nothing is perfect but, I'm going to stick with and recommend the Protect-A-Tow - $223 delivered (from Canada).

A very similar product is the Blue-Ox Underskirt pn.BX88165. You can download the installation instructions in PDF format at this link: Blue-Ox Underskirt Installation Instructions - virtually identical to the Protect-A-Tow

Both companies are commercial members of FMCA.

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We put a clear plastic film (like 3M or Diamond-shield) on our Enclave when we bought it. Don't remember the name of the company; it's smoother than the 3M we have on the coach.

.. Rick

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I bought a 2008 Enclave, mainly because it was towable. And from the first trip, the Check Engine Light comes on after a few tow cycles. I took it to the dealer where they checked the codes and said a "cannister" needed replaced, which they did. Next trip, same thing, same code, new cannister. This went on every time we took the coach out. Finally, the same Service Writer decided there must be something else wrong. After a deeper trouble shooting they replaces the cannister and the wiring bundle that connects it to the computer. Well guess what happened the next trip. Right, "Check Engine Light". This time the Service Writer called Buick engineering in Lansing Michigan. The Engineer replied, "Yeah, that's what the Buicks do. Have the customer get a Code reader and he can reset the light." This did not seem like a reasonable thing to do, because I would never know it I would be resetting an invalid code or if there was a real fault that needed attention. Now, in the 2012 Towing Guide from FMCA, the procedure for all GM Crossovers requires pulling 2 fuses, the 15-amp ECM fuse and the 50-amp BATT 1 fuse. Previously, only the 50-amp BATT 1 fuse was pulled. Will this keep the invalid Check Engine Light from illuminating or is it totally unrelated? (P.S.: The 2012 DINGY TOWING GUIDE from Motorhome Magazine does not mention the 15-amp ECM fuse,)

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