jwdemarest

Tire Air Pumps

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We have gone through a few tire air pumps trying to find one that will not burn out trying to fill our tires on our Tiffin Phaeton. Has anyone found a pump that does not take up a huge amount of space but does the job?

 

Joanna

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Welcome to the forum. Are you talking about the little 12V air pumps? I did see someone using one of these Viair 40047 400P-RV Automatic Portable Compressor Kit. The key is it has a 150 lb. working pressure. I have seen them on Amazon. 

Bill

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ObedB   

Our Phaeton has a hook up for an air line in the compartment under the driver's seat. Can be used to be towed and to air up tires. Might be able to buy a 50foot version at RV supply houses. Try to get rubber hose because it is more flexible and easier to recoil.

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"No rubber hoses" Sorry B you want what the building trades call a "jelly hose" they do not kink, and are easily coiled in warm or cold weather. Available at Home Depot and Lowes. You can see the webbing in the hose. Not expensive

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manholt   

Joanna.  Welcome to the Forum!

What year and length is your Phaethon?  You should be able to use your onboard "Dry Air" compressor!  Yes, you would need a "Jelly Hose" and appropriate fittings...get 50 foot.

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FIVE   
16 hours ago, obedb said:

...Our Phaeton has a hook up for an air line in the compartment under the driver's seat. Can be used to be towed and to air up tires...

My coach has the same on board air system.  It's a PITA...have to start the coach, use high idle and time the process as to when to use the air system so it actually puts air in these big tires.  Got tired fooling with it and got a Porter-Cable, 6 gallon, 150 PSI, portable compressor at Lowes for $100.  I got mine on sale, the one in the link is $130.  I never leave home without it.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Porter-Cable-6-Gal-150-PSI-Portable-Air-Compressor-C2002/203162815?&cm_mmc=Shopping|THD|B|0|B-BASE-D25H+Air+Compressors|&mid=qhRFVpyN|dc_mtid_8903vry57826_pcrid_73804731432598_pkw__pmt__

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X-2 on using the 150# Porter Cable compressor.  You can get 50 ft, 1/4" poly air hose at Harbor Freight.  You do not need volume. You need pressure. I leave the compressor in a bin and do not remove it. I use a 12-3 10 ft extension to run up two bins to my out side outlet. Not a fan of HF, but I have one of these hoses in the motor home, one in my garage where my 2nd Porter Cable compressor is located, and a 25 ft on my reel in the center of my wood working shop. You will need to add a quick connect fitting to the tank full pressure side to get full effect of the 150# compressor.  There fitting that is include has a regulator that you can leave at 35-50# to fill auto, golf cart or bicycle tires. 

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ObedB   

I also use the Porter Cable six gallon compressor to top off my tires, but I did not mention it because I got yelled at by the guys that live in the sub tropical coastal humid portions of Texas. Brett being one😎. Oh well. Time out. 😉

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wolfe10   
17 minutes ago, obedb said:

I also use the Porter Cable six gallon compressor to top off my tires, but I did not mention it because I got yelled at by the guys that live in the sub tropical coastal humid portions of Texas....

Ya, with the dew point above 70 degrees F (easy to get to a dew point above 80 on the Gulf coast) you really don't want to use a compressor without AIR DRYER.  Putting WATER into the tire is not recommended.

1. Water can rust steel belts.

2. Water is NOT an "ideal gas", and temperature/PSI curves (remember in high school the Ideal Gas Law) for water are VERY different/worse than for DRY AIR.

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One of the best additions to any coach that does not have one and has air for bags or brakes is the air drier.  It is not difficult nor expensive and will at some point save you a lot of the green stuff. No more remembering to drain your air tank. It is all automatic. In any climate some maintenance as with anything. It's one of the first projects I did on my old/new Safari Panther since it only had 11,767 on it when I drove it home.

Bill

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I don’t think we were discussing the air dryer for the brakes and suspension. It was what compressor to use or can onboard compressor work to top off the tires. Even though my coach does have air brakes with a dryer, the pressure required to top off a tire that has 100 psi to get it to 110 psi would be hard pressed for the onboard compressor. That is why I will continue to use my Porter Cable. 

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manholt   
Quote

Dry air in tires

Wayne is an expert on water and tires...his old coach learned to swim this year! :( All kidding aside.  I agree, my onboard air will take my coach tires to 115 pounds (steer tires), 105 for Drive tires and 95 for Tag!  I do carry a 150 portable with me, just in case! :)

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wolfe10   
9 hours ago, wayne77590 said:

Dummy wants to know why drive has 105 psi and tag 95 psi.

Don't tell me you ran out of air either.

 

Correct PSI for each axle depends on the load IT is carrying-- pretty much unrelated to other axles. 

Best is to use weigh individual wheel positions and use heavier wheel position on each axle to go to your tire manufacturer's inflation chart to determine correct MINIMUM PSI for all tires on that axle.

And, many tag axles are adjustable. Best that each axle carries the same PERCENT OF GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating).

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9 hours ago, wayne77590 said:

Dummy wants to know why drive has 105 psi and tag 95 psi.

Don't tell me you ran out of air either.

 

Wayne,

We are talking about Carl. Nothing is surprising coming from him. He might even air up his tires to Left Front to 113.5 psi, Right Front to 115.5 psi, Left Drive to 106.3 psi, Right Drive to 104.7 psi, Left Tag to 94.8 psi and right Tag to 95.0 psi. This is Carl, gotta love him.:lol: :D :ph34r: 

Herman

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fagnaml   

Carl  (and others) --

I received the Central Pneumatic 150 psi compressor from my sons as a Christmas present a couple of years ago from Harbor Freight --> https://www.harborfreight.com/6-gal-15-hp-150-psi-professional-air-compressor-68149.html .  I do not take it with me on trips as it would take a chunk of room in a storage compartment.  My thinking is if a tire needed a quick "topping off" I would use the motorhome's air system (there is a permanently mounted coupler for an air hose in the generator compartment of my motorhome).

I hadn't thought about putting "wet" air into tires on my motorhome, or my Jeep or the wife's Infinti.   I'm not aware that tire dealerships in the Houston area "dry" the compressed air they use for the new tires they install.   The Discount Tire store near Katy Mills Mall is my "go to" store for the Jeep and Infiniti.  I'll have to quiz them about their store air system.

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The regulator on the compressor can be set higher to do the job. It is my understanding and I'm sure to be corrected, is that the pressure in the bags is regulated by the air valves which adjust for height not necessarily for pressure. There fore the regulator can be adjusted to a higher pressure to accommodate airing up your tires to prescribed or desired pressures.

B

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manholt   

We are on the road now, but before leaving Linda's place, I asked her if she had a 150 + psi air compressor (she has about everything else), Linda took me around a building that I had not paid attention too.  Ingersoll Rand 80 gallon, 175 psi :wub: lines running underground to all the barns including the RV shed, with hose attachment points!  I was in air heaven, until I asked where is the dryer and when was it used last....deceased husband got rid of drier and no use since 2014. :wacko: I turned it on, got it up to 40# and opened the tank drain, water, gallons of water.  when we left it was still emptying out...her son called yesterday and he had it get to 150#, then bled it off to 50 and opened the valve and let it drain! 

I will use it eventually and it will have a drier, also Linda's son is going to cap off the current underground lines and run a new system....we suspect that the current lines have a lot of rust in them as the system was open, now closed.. 

How would you like some of that in your tires? :blink:

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wolfe10   
10 hours ago, RSBILLEDWARDS said:

The regulator on the compressor can be set higher to do the job. It is my understanding and I'm sure to be corrected, is that the pressure in the bags is regulated by the air valves which adjust for height not necessarily for pressure. There fore the regulator can be adjusted to a higher pressure to accommodate airing up your tires to prescribed or desired pressures.

B

Probably OK within reason, but air pressure also affects air brake function.

So, guess setting the air governor cut-out PSI above top of factory specs would not be my approach.

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