rfsod48

Diesel Fuel For COLD Conditions

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jleamont   

I wouldn't do that. What is available where you are located? Do you carry fuel additives with you?

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jleamont   

I would run with that before I put any Kero in my fuel. Kero contains less energy and much less lubricant, while its not likely to freeze the other problem's wouldn't help your situation in the long run. In my experience they just ping and produce much less power.

I would top it off and add diesel fuel conditioner in the tank and hit the road. Do you carry extra fuel filters?

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jleamont   

The fuel in the tank (fuel station) should already be cut with kerosene and proper additives, but to an allowable limit.

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I am parked in Pa but use a lot of diesel for my Aquaheat System. I am adding about 15-20 gallons a week and do not plan on starting Coach Engine for several months, should I be adding something to my fuel to prevent jelling since I do need it for the Aquaheat System?

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jleamont   
15 minutes ago, rfsod48 said:

Tank is nearly full 

I wouldn't hesitate to top it off then. Carry some 911 and fuel conditioner, spare filters and head south. I carry everything but 911 and use fuel additives at every fill up, got burned once, not happening twice!

Enjoy your trip!

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jleamont   

With the 911 in the tank its not likely you will have any problems, that stuff works great!

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jleamont   

Pops, as I mentioned above, I only run fuel additives, if it were me I would add some, better safe than sorry. Since you are not experiencing any problems I would add just a fuel conditioner for insurance. I got burned at a truck stop outside of Pittsburgh in 2016 it took almost a year to get the bugs out of the fuel...yeah I said bugs!

http://www.diesel-bug.com/diesel-bug-information.html

 

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Good link Joe, I use the White bottle if and when I  think the temperatures will be below 30*. I don't think it will be a problem using it in Your Aquaheat System in the recommended ratio. 

Bill

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obedb   

Have not been to Fargo ND in awhile but the Flying J there offered straight #2 Diesel, #1 Diesel (essentially kerosene)  and commonly used in in two stroke diesel powered trucks. In the bitter months, reefer tanks ( refrigerated trailers ) because there is very little warmed fuel returned to the fuel tank hanging under the trailer was used as a blend or full kerosene. The J  also offered a blend of #1 and #2 for use in either truck tanks and reefer tanks. 

My point. Kerosene blends have been used in really cold parts of our country for a very long time and truckers wrote the book on COLD when traveling in North Dakota!!!  

Yes/ there are some really good additives available now, but I don't remember them being accepted or available when I ran the north country. Kerosene should be acceptable  for your rig in a blended configuration.

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jleamont   

Adding Kero in a modern diesel could cost some serious and expensive damage. In a controlled environment (refinery) along with the other components to make is atomize and lubricate properly, ok.

Old school diesel sure, I have heard the stories like ATF and used motor oil in the fuel tanks and gallons of kero, those old mechanical engines were true power houses built to last, wasn't much they wouldn't run on. New engines can't handle too much sulfur without destroying internal engine components, make it ping too much the some sensor will most likely shut it down or crack a piston.

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Looks like the OP is in Michigan. Whether they are selling #1 or #2, any fuel sold this time of year should definitely have the proper winter additives in it to prevent gelling and temperature related problems. That said, if Michigan is anything like Wisconsin it should be possible to find #1 fuel at most major truck stops or even places like Kwik Trip. If your engine can run on #2 in the warmer weather, I'd suggest checking with the fuel dealer to see if the #2 they sell this time of year is winterized. I'd be surprised if it wasn't. One place I bought from said that in the winter they only sell #1, regardless of what the pump said. Maybe not the best example of truth in advertising, but at least they were trying to keep customers from having gelling and cold weather issues. Point is that it's important to look past the label on the pump and ask questions of the fuel dealer to see just what is being sold. I think that the bigger problem would be someone filling a tank in the south and then driving into the north where the temps are low. Without proper additives it could be an expensive trip when the fuel system stops up from gel formation.

I make sure to add the proper amount of anti-gelling additive to the fuel starting in late fall so that it's well into the fuel lines and filters before any chance of cold weather is even on the horizon. Had problems with my step van (Cummins Diesel 4BT) the first year I owned it - it arrived from a southern dealer with summer blend in the tank and the lines were gelled stem to stern before it was rolled off the trailer. Happened again a short time later until I was able to get the old fuel fully worked through.

I'd agree that adding kerosene to a modern diesel is probably not a great idea. Before trying that I'd want to have the manufacturer's recommendation for minimum fuel requirements. Same goes for selecting the proper additives. Some engines are very fussy and certain additives should be avoided.

Any local farm store (around here Farm & Fleet or Fleet Farm) should have shelves of additives to choose from.

Hope this helps.

 

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8 hours ago, rfsod48 said:

I am not able to get #1 diesel, can I top off tank with kerosene?

richard5933, Just wanted to add you into this reply. 

I would not use any additive except Diesel Kleen which is approved and recommended by Cummins.

http://powerservice.com/psp_product/diesel-fuel-supplement-cetane-boost/

I use it in every tank to help compensate for the poor diesel that is at the pumps.

Bill

 

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