richard5933

Entry Door Lock Freezing

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Our entry door is held closed by a Yale dead bolt. It looks to be the original one installed by Custom Coach in 1974. The lock is a high quality lock, and it's not the lock cylinder itself I'm having problems with. When the sun warms the roof a bit and snow melt drips from the roof, it is working its way down the rubber gasket between the door and the jamb, and then it finds its way into the bolt mechanism.

When this happens I can turn the lock cylinder. However, the bolt will not retract and is frozen into the mechanism. It takes a few minutes with a hair dryer to get it to free up and then everything works as planned.

I've opened things up and sprayed liberally with lock anti-freeze/lubricant. It seems like the lubricant is really lightweight, and it almost totally evaporates after application. Must be some type of dry lube.

My thought is that I'm going to have to use something which will stay in place and help prevent the water from entering the bolt mechanism, but I'm afraid to use a regular oil-based lube since in the sub-zero temps it will turn to molasses and probably cause more problems than it fixes.

Any thoughts on some type of lubricant which will keep the moisture out but not thicken up to the point of non-functioning in the freezing temps?

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manholt   

Richard.

Your problem seems to be the rubber gasket itself.  Until Spring, can you put a temporary gutter over the door gasket?

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jleamont   

Carl, I was just thinking the same thing, maybe a small channel above the door opening to move the water flow, or an overlapping door seal so when the door is closed it keeps the jamb dry?

We have about an 1/8" rubber flap that is attached to the door, when its closed it covers the jamb.

 

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Nothing wrong with the gasket. Just replaced it this fall. For some reason, the dead bolt is situated in a place that will get water going past it from time to time. Look at any household front door and it will be the same thing - lock bolt is often outside the gasket.

With the way the bus is parked right now on an incline, combined with the position of the rain gutter (on the bus, not the house) above it results in water making it to where I wish it wasn't.

What I'm looking for is something to spray in the mechanism to keep water from sticking around in there. I'm going to try silicon spray, but would love to hear if anyone else has suggestions.

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campcop   

I use a lock lubricant that is basically a solvent and graphite. Been using it for a few years on all my locks at home and in the MH.

Panef lock lubricant aerosol.

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Richard,

That is a real issue when in trying to get into the coach, but it could be a really big issue if you were trying to get out.

I have seen in the FMCA Magazine a small gutter cap that diverts the water away from the coach.  CW calls it a "RV Rain Gutter Spouts, 4-pack $8.79." This may help stop the rain from running down the door and into the dead bolt.

Herman

 

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jleamont   

Richard, I think you miss understood, here are two photos. My door jamb is sealed from the elements then there is another gasket to seal it from the interior. Perhaps you could retrofit something?

IMG_4256.JPG

IMG_4257.JPG

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cmarq   

Use Fluid Film available at Lowes & Home Depot, NAPA. It is a lanolin based penetrant and lubricant. no solvents long lasting non toxic non hazardous. It comes in a spray can with straw for tight places.  It will work here in Connecticut we do snowplowing we buy in gallons and with a sprayer made for it we spray all the undersides of our trucks. We spread salt on parking lots and the chemicals the state uses on the roads are very corrosive it does  a great job protecting our equipment.  After every storm everything gets washed down nothing freezes up.

www.fluid-film.com

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jleamont   

Fluid film is a good recommendation, too bad you are so far away, I have a can in my office at work, I'd give it to you.

Herman, not sure...came that way and it works...what's yours look like?

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Here's what our dead bolt looks like. The rectangular bolt is having water enter around the perimeter of the bolt and essentially it gets frozen to the door. Since the dead bolt is what holds the door closed it typically freezes in the locked position.It's much beefier than the one posted in the photo above, and it looks like it fits into the housing with less clearance. Tight tolerances are usually a good thing, but apparently not when trying to keep a lock from freezing locked.

There is a new gasket one the left door jamb. It has two parts that stick out. The outer one doesn't make a great seal until the door us closed from the inside using the driver's locking handle (you know, the old fashioned handle that the driver uses to pull and latch the door shut.) The inner seal make a fairly weather-tight seal and keeps the water out of the interior.

Gaskets and door seals on these old buses are actually not a simple operation. Our door is slightly pushed out at the bottom (probably got pulled shut by the drivers at some time with something stuck in the door at the bottom corner.) I can add a stick-on gasket to the back side of the door skin, but my fear is that it will make the top of the door too tight and keep if from latching altogether. And, if I don't run the seal all the way across the top I'll still have water seeping in and around the door jamb.

So, this is why I'm looking for a product to spray into the lock to keep it from freezing in place. I've got a can of Fluid Film on the way and I'll see how it works.

Here's what our dead bolt looks like. The rectangular bolt is having water enter around the perimeter of the bolt and essentially it gets frozen to the door. Since the dead bolt is what holds the door closed it typically freezes in the locked position.

There is a new gasket one the left door jamb. It has two parts that make contact with the door. The outer part is more of a wind block and doesn't make a great seal until the door us closed from the inside using the driver's locking handle (you know, the old fashioned handle that the driver uses to pull and latch the door shut.) The inner seal make a fairly weather-tight seal and keeps the water out of the interior.

Gaskets and door seals on these old buses are actually not a simple operation. Our door is slightly torqued and pushed out at the bottom (probably got pulled shut by a driver at some time with something stuck in the door at the bottom corner.) Since we don't have any water getting to the inside of the coach or anywhere that it can do damage (other than freezing the lock) I'm hesitant to start trying to 'fix' the door. Any changes I make to one corner will only move the problem somewhere else.

I can add a stick-on gasket to the back side of the door skin to augment the outer wind break, but my fear is that it will make the top of the door too tight and keep if from latching altogether. And, if I can't run the seal all the way across the top I'll still have water seeping in and around the door jamb.

So, this is why I'm looking for a product to spray into the lock to keep it from freezing in place. I've got a can of Fluid Film on the way and I'll see how it works. Before spraying it into the lock I'll spray some into an old door lock I've got in the shop and then leave it in the sub-zero weather to see if it gums up the works when the temps drop. Want to make sure the cure doesn't cause any more problems.

Thanks for the suggestions so far.

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25 minutes ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

Can you get access to spray the internal lock works?

Bill

Not a problem to get inside. Even if it freezes I can get it, I just have to stand there for 10 minutes with the hair dryer. Once the door is open a couple of screws and it all comes apart.

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Have you considered a very low wattage 12 volt heating device that can be controlled by a thermistor to come on and remain on until it reaches a predetermined heat? I know that your coach is 24 volts, but can be operated by the 12 volt house system unless that is 24 volts also.

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Richard,

Your dead bolt is a solid made lock and nothing like what Motor Home and Towables for the matter put in. I would try the product Joe mentioned. Just a thought, you might try googling Aircraft Maintenance in Alaska. Then give one of them a call and see what kind of lube they use up there.

Herman 

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manholt   

Herman.  Or Tulle, Greenland c/o USAF Base. :D

Richard.  Any oil company that has rigs in Wyoming, N/S Dakota or Alaska should be able to help you in your quest.  Try Neighbors, Pioneer, Sanchez, Apache or Santa Fe.

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campcop   

How much space is there between the door and the jamb in the area of the dead bolt? If you have an 1/8” or more, you can try running a narrow bead of RTV above and down both sides of the deadbolt, this would keep any moisture from running into the deadbolt area

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