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peterdube

House Batteries Cut-off Solonoid Gets Warm/hot When ''On''

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I own a 1999 Monaco Windsor and when I have the switch on for the house, the solenoid gets fairly warm.

Is this normal ??????????????

Every thing works fine,but don't want problems!

Thanks for any help.

Peter from Maine

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Is it an Intellec switching system? If it is, there is only control current when switching on or off. If its getting hot it is possible that there is some resistance in the contactor generating heat.

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Hi Peter, I have a 2003 Monaco Windsor and yes it gets hot, I have used two in the last 4yrs. Some people dispense with them and just hard wire the connection, but I figure there has to be a reason why its there so I replaced mine and I carry a spare. Hope this helps smokeater75.

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Thanks guys for the HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I have just ordered three 70-902 coil 12vdccont. [w-r/RBM] solenoids. Got them at Allied Electronics 866-433-5722 24.00 each. WELL WORTH IT!!!!!!!!!! Peter Dube

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My concern would be if the solenoid is drawing current to be switched on, there is always a current draw against the batteries when the house batteries are on.

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They use momentary switches to toggle latching relays. So there is no high current drawn by the relay coils, only when they are turned on or off. Toggled.

The contacts are generally made of tungsten to handle high current loads.

The key to longer relay life (the ATS) is to reduce the load on them when plugging into shore power or starting the generators. This reduces the current surge on the contacts, less arching longer contact life.

The heat mentioned is from current load, you will see higher temperatures at them as the contacts degrade. Higher resistance at the contact points equal higher voltage drop at a given current load.

This is true for all coaches equipped with transfer switches, 30 amp or 50 amp service.

You might notice that your circuit breakers on the generators start to trip more often as the ATS contacts degrade, also might encounter an increase in the shore power panel breakers tripping when you turn them on after plugging in.

Rich.

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Rich,

Thanks for the info. The coil or as I call it a solenoid, is controlled by a toggle switch by the entrance door up front. It says" battery cut out switch". It shuts almost everything down except the clocks and other small things. I don't think I'm talking about the auto transfer switch. It's a switch for convenience, by not having to shut the main switch.

Are we on the same page Rich?

THANKS,

Peter

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Peter ! Monaco uses latching relays in most cases. That means a momentary switch is all that is needed to turn on or off the 12 volt system.

The closest drawings I have are for a 03 Windsor, so things could be different.

The 12 volts is present at the relays and all the switch does is supply a momentary ground so it can change state.

Think you listed the part number and manufacture, (hands full at the time) if so could you re post that info. and I will check out there specifications and applications when the dust settles.

Rich.

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Monaco's are a little bit different.

We have 2 main solenoids. The "boost" solenoid joins the 2 battery banks, ensuring everything is kept charged, and providing extra power when needed. The boost solenoid is triggered by the boost switch on the dash, as well as by the "BIRD" circuit which keeps the batteries charged under all conditions. The boost solenoid is in the battery compartment in our Knight, but is in the engine bay on some higher end Monaco's.

The other main solenoid on a Monaco is the "Salesman's switch" This one is on a circuit board on the front "run bay board", in the front drivers side basement bay, on the board where many of the DC fuses are.The "salesman's switch" solenoid is triggered by a switch on the panel just inside the front door. It controls the non-essential 12 volt stuff. Lighting and such. It does not control anything important. It won't shut off your fridge, or your furnace.

Unlike Fleetwoods and some others, neither of these are latching relays. They require a constant 12v to the coil, and they get hot. The salesman switch solenoid can be bypassed easily. Mine is and I'm good with that, as it serves no real purpose to me.

The boost solenoid is another story. This one needs to work well. With the BIRD circuit, it is energized more often than not ( many older monaco's had no bird, or different bird's that don't behave like mine) and that 100 amp Trombetta continuous duty relay gets really really hot. It get's kinda dirty and corroded inside too, I recently had to open mine up and clean it out. Restored normal operation in an hour, for zero dollars.

I kinda wish this thing had latching relays, like my old Pacearrow did. But its a Monaco, and that's how they are.

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