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How Well Does A Full Length Mudflap Work When Towing Toad?


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9 replies to this topic

#1 GaryEJones

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 09:46 AM

I am brand new to RVing. I bought a 2001 Monaco Dynasty tag axle diesel pusher.

I have recently bought a Honda CR-V toad. My rig came with a Demco Aluminator tow bar. My Dynasty has a full length Monaco mud flap behind the tag axle and my visual inspection indicates that there should be very little possibility of the tag axle throwing stones directly at the paint of my Honda, but debris on the road could certainly still be a problem.

I have seen additional shields on the tow bars advertised and other "systems" on the toad itself. I could use some knowledge gained from experience here. Those of you who routinely do this, what are your recommendations. My Honda is brand new and want to keep it a pristine as I can. If you think it is essential to have additional protection, and have experience with a particular system, I would appreciate your recommendation.

Thanks

Gary
2001 Monaco Dynasty tag / Honda CR-V
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#2 mrboyer

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 06:05 PM

We have a full mudflap and a Roadmaster shield. We have had other protection systems and none are perfect. You will still get some chipping of paint on the toad.
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#3 desertdeals69

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 07:44 PM

When my friend followed me through Alaska he had a full mudflap. He was pulling a full size Ford van. We found the headlights were broken and full of gravel. We replaced them and they broke again. After looking at the situation we concluded that the rocks thrown off the tires were hitting the full mud flap and bouncing off the road and up to the headlights. We stopped at a plastic shop in Anchorage a got some lexan and duck taped the covers on. Now the rocks just bounced off. On my toad I used 2 camping sleeping mats, from Wal Mart, and held in place with bungee cords. Not one mark on my truck and I still use that system on my current Silverado. Total cost of the 100% protection, $ 20.
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#4 RoryTug

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 08:58 PM

I have found a little if any benefit in the large mud flap on the rear. After a cross country trip years ago, I found the front of my car especially the passenger side to be dinged and chipped. I think the vortex created by the coach sucks gravel and debris from the side of the road. I went to the TowShield which is basically a full bra that covers the entire front of the toad from the whole windshield to below the bumper. I have suffered no further damage since.
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#5 DuraFlap

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:50 PM

Hi Gary,
We speak with many customers about their mud flaps, and hear all sorts of stories and opinions.
The most important step to preventing rocks from hitting your toad is to stop them in the fenderwells directly behind the tires where they start. You want to make sure those mud flaps are as long as possible without them hitting the ground when you let the air out and drop your coach. Usually they end up around 4" off the ground as you are moving down the road. Also make sure they are made of a stiff enough material to not just fly up behind as you are moving. These will stop at least 80% of the rocks.
Just like you do everything you can to get the best possible mileage, you may also want to do everything you can to stop the rocks from hitting your new tow vehicle. The mud flap across the back is just one more way to increase the protection. You do want to make sure the mud flap is not too close to the ground. We suggest at least 4" off the ground. Otherwise, on uneven and/or gravel roads you may actually end up throwing more rocks at your tow vehicle.
Some RV'ers also suggest using a shield between the coach and the toad. These are a bit cumbersome, but for a brand new vehicle, it may be worth it.
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#6 Allegiance40x

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 08:13 AM

Some of the terminology here is confusing. I have "mud flaps" behind each set of dual wheels. I also have a "rock guard" that is under the hitch, goes all the way across the rear of the coach and has two cables to prevent it from swinging backward while moving. No toad damage as yet.
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#7 GaryEJones

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 08:20 AM

Thanks for the information. I wonder if the stone guard on the very back is something that you constructed or added to your coach or if it is a commercial product that you bought and added? The brand new toad will be my wife's car when we are not RVing and I dont want to beat the heck out of it prematurely, both for its potential resale value and simply because she and I dont like to drive anything that isn't well cared for, so keeping it as undamaged as we can is our goal.

I am still looking at all options...

If you can, please tell me about your rear-mounted rock guard. Thanks up front

Gary
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#8 GaryEJones

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 08:30 AM

Let me try to clear up terminology. My rig has no mud flap directly behind the tag axle or the drive axle. What it has is a full length rubber and stainless steel flap that runs from one side to the other side that has the name Monaco engraved or painted on it. The flap is heavy and I cant tell if it will fly back horizontal as I drive at speed or stay vertical. It is suspended from the frame and it is located about midway from the tag axle wheel to the end of the coach. There is nothing to keep it from "sailing" horizontal and I dont know if it will do that or say vertical. The distance from the tag to the end of the coach is so far that I think that it would prevent any "thrown" rocks or debris from hitting the toad, but I had not considered that a stone thrown from the tire, and hitting the Monaco signature flap could still bounce around and end up hitting the toad and so I was trying to add some extra protection to the toad.... There have been few replies, so maybe most owners pull their toad with no additiional protection and don't have problems. We are going to take our first trips soon pulling the toad.

Thanks for the comments

Gary
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#9 Wayne77590

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:58 PM

Hi,
I have mud flaps behind the duals, and the full lenght mud flap. I don't have a tag axle. It is as DuraFlap outlined. Also, in some states, and Texas is the one I am in, any vehicle with 4 or more wheels on the rear is required to have mud flaps behind the rear wheels and they can be no more than 8 inches off the ground.

Now, my personal experience is that the full lenght mudflap prevented some serious damage to my TOAD when the passenger side foot on the leveling jack decided that it wanted to travel alone. I heard and felt a bump, bump, bump and pulled over. I had to take the full lenght mud flap down until I got to my next campground so I could straighten out the angle iron supporting it. It was mangled. I really believe if that mud flap had not have been there the TOAD wouldl have had some serious damage.

Consider road alegators and other obstructions that could be stoped by the mud flap.

Some will say that the full lenght mud flap throws debris up into the engine, and it may well do so. I'm not going to ride on the engine to find out.

Hello, DW, I have a job for you!!!
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Wayne, MSgt, USMC (Ret)

2008 Winnebago Destination

2013 Lincoln MKX


#10 charles10

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 07:35 PM

We tow an older pickup in which we carry a 4 wheeler. Every year after several thousand miles we have front end damage to repair. Sometime the grill and hood are actually sand blasted. When we see someone towing a nice vehicle the subject of looks always comes up as we have arguements about towing a nicer vehicle. From our experience we would definitely have some type of bra on a nice vehicle. Our rig does include a flap completely accross the rear of the coach. Husband who is retired military always wants to look good so we repaint!

Have to admit we are somewhat jealous of those nice new vehicles as toads but it would never work for us. They are left in the carport.
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