Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Wheel Chocks - Needed And If Yes, Most Preferred


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 GaryEJones

GaryEJones

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Shreveport, LA
  • I travel:With Pets

Posted 20 January 2013 - 10:32 AM

I am new to motorhoming, but recently bought a 2001 Monaco Dynasty Tag Diesel Pusher. I assume that a good set of stackable or "collapsible" wheel chocks is probably a good idea to have on board. However, I don't really know for sure. I would appreciate knowing the issues from some of you more experienced owners. Is this a good idea, mandatory, or irrelevant, and if you think they are needed, do you have a recommendation on types that are good, take the least apace in the basement, etc.

I appreciate your views in advance.

Gary
2001 Dynasty Tag / Honda CR-V
  • 0
Newsbie-
New Owner of a 2001 Monaco Dynasty Regent
2 slides, 370 Cummins

#2 Kevin510

Kevin510

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Location:Amarillo, Texas
  • I travel:With children, With Pets

Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:08 AM

By wheel chocks, do mean the kind that you put in front and behind the wheels to keep it from rolling? These are used heavily in the trucking industry but I have never seen them used on a coach, only on travel trailers and fifth wheels. Or are you attempting to get your tires off the ground while parked or stored. Ohh, and welcome Gary. There are a lot of good people here with lots of great info. And congrats on your purchase.
  • 0
2003 Newmar Scottsdale 3670
2006 Jeep Commander HEMI toad

#3 bebop

bebop

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Location:San Jose, CA

Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:57 AM

I always used them back in the day when I towed a 35 foot fifth wheel but never use them on the motorhome unless the lot is pretty far our of level then I will put them out for extra insurance. BeBop
  • 0
Bebop & Jann
San Jose, CA
2004 Rexhall Rexair
Saturn SC2 Toad

#4 GaryEJones

GaryEJones

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Location:Shreveport, LA
  • I travel:With Pets

Posted 20 January 2013 - 12:09 PM

Yes, my question applies to wheel chocks that would go in front or behind wheels to keep the motorhome from rolling back or forward. I am new to air brakes and thought that if you were parked on a steep incline, that the chocks would be an appropriate safety feature. I did drive a semi 35 years ago and I used them on tractors and trailers on steep grades, and was not sure if they were wise or needed on my RV. I appreciate your comments and experience...... always eager to learn from someone who has more experience than I.....

Gary
  • 0
Newsbie-
New Owner of a 2001 Monaco Dynasty Regent
2 slides, 370 Cummins

#5 desertdeals69

desertdeals69

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,301 posts

Posted 20 January 2013 - 07:52 PM

I carry a wheel chock only because it was in the coach when I bought it. I have never had to use it. Air brakes need air to release the park brake. You can't move until you have enough air pressure to release the park brake.
  • 0

#6 Kevin510

Kevin510

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 40 posts
  • Location:Amarillo, Texas
  • I travel:With children, With Pets

Posted 20 January 2013 - 10:28 PM

Gary, I personally would not worry about it. A coach with air brakes is not going anywhere until it has enough air to release. But that being said, if chocking your wheels lets you sleep easier, by all means do it. It certainly could'nt hurt.
  • 0
2003 Newmar Scottsdale 3670
2006 Jeep Commander HEMI toad

#7 Allegiance40x

Allegiance40x

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 394 posts
  • Location:Somewhere in the USA.

Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:54 AM

I always used them back in the day when I towed a 35 foot fifth wheel but never use them on the motorhome unless the lot is pretty far our of level then I will put them out for extra insurance. BeBop


Ditto.
  • 0

#8 jtfcons

jtfcons

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 22 January 2013 - 05:48 PM

I have a set and use them to mark where I have cables laid on the ground to remind me to not trip on them :)
  • 0

#9 mrd543

mrd543

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 27 January 2013 - 07:30 PM

I think with the leveling jacks down and the air brakes applied the chances of rolling away is slim. Use them if you want extra insurance.
  • 0

#10 taylor5

taylor5

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts

Posted 28 January 2013 - 11:32 AM

Ditto.

X3
  • 0

A Guy Who Likes Everything RV 

Never too Old to Buggy - RV Tips, RV Guides


#11 KJSchrag

KJSchrag

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 11:01 AM

I have a 2004 Itasca Meridian Coach and use chocks. I made my own from a piece of 4x4. Cut in half at a 45 degree angle. Drill the end oposite the 45 angle for a 1/8 rope handle.  Cheap and work well.


  • 0

#12 rockylarson

rockylarson

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 03 November 2013 - 04:05 PM

I use a pair all the time.  They are the last thing to be put away, after the antenna's are down, sewer hose put away, water hoses stowed and the power cord stashed.  Once around the site for forgotten items and a look see that everything is as it should be and only then are the chocks put away and I am good to go.


  • 0
Rocky
2004 Allegro 30DA, Workhorse 8.1, Banks, 2003 Honda CRV, Blue Ox Aladdin, 300watts Solar, 7 group 31 Optima AGM's, 2000watt  Ames PSW inverter

#13 TBUTLER

TBUTLER

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,399 posts
  • Location:Sandpipers Resort, Edinburg, Texas

Posted 03 November 2013 - 05:05 PM

I agree with Rocky, I chock my coach as soon as I hook up the electric.  When I unhook the electric I store the chocks in the compartment where the electric cable reel is located.  I continue to do it as a reminder to make sure that everything is unhooked and put away before driving away.  I've never driven off with the electric cord attached!  I think it is just a good basic safety tool.  I use the heavy duty chocks sold at Camping World.  They can be crushed by a diesel motor home, don't ask how I know, doing so takes some effort and isn't an event you would not notice.


  • 0

Tom and Louise Butler
2004 Monaco Windsor, Cummins 400 ISL
Roadmaster Sterling Tow Bar, Brakemaster, GMC Acadia, BikeE Recumbent Bicycles

After 9 1/2 years full time in our motor home and being Winter Texans we are now living at Sandpipers Resort in Edinburg, Texas. Now we are Summer Chickens!

"The tipi is much better to live in; always clean and warm in winter, cool in summer, easy to move... If the Great Spirit wanted men to live in one place he would have made the world stand still." -- Flying Hawk, South Dakota Oglala Sioux


#14 turtlemechanic

turtlemechanic

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 48 posts
  • Location:Mountain City,TN
  • I travel:With Pets

Posted 04 November 2013 - 10:43 AM

One thing to think about with air brakes:

 

If you have semi-metallic brake shoes and drive in the rain, and stop with cold drums; then you apply your brakes and wait a few days you go to release the brakes and find out the shoes have rusted to the drums and won't release.

 

W/O chocks you can't safely release the shoes with a hammer, because if you have the air up, so springs are not holding the shoes against the drum and the brakes suddenly release the coach can roll away.

 

So carrying chocks with me :

 

I then can put two chocks in front and behind tires and can safely use a hammer to "break the shoes loose" w/o the bus running me over just something to keep in back of your mind.

 

Also I have a habit of releasing all air from system; just in case the brake release is hit or whatever...the brakes will not come off since the springs are holding it tight.


  • 0

Doug
3/3 ACR 19K
Skoolies forever

 

one of the ORIGINAL Founding members of:
smalllogo.png


#15 RTinVa

RTinVa

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts

Posted 14 December 2013 - 09:32 PM

Very valuable advice Doug.  Never new that could happen and if it does I will wish I had wheel chocks.  Looks like I will be shopping for them before the cover comes off the new coach!  Thank you!!


  • 0

Rich & Carin

Warrenton, Virginia

2014 Fleetwood Expedition 38B,

2010 TSX on the Kar Kaddy SS in back.

        Life is good!!

 

 

 


#16 hermanmullins

hermanmullins

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,709 posts
  • Location:Whitewright, TEXAS

Posted 15 December 2013 - 03:40 PM

One thought, if you have a fear of loosing your brakes due to low air, don't worry. When your air goes down to 60 psi (I believe) your park brake will set and not release until the pressure comes back up. 

 

Herman


  • 0

"Fair winds and Following Seas"

Herman & Bobbie Mullins, F302225
Whitewright, TEXAS
'02 Monaco Dynasty, 40-foot 400 HP ISL
Chevrolet Silverado (M & G air brakes)
U.S. Navy PR-3 1956 to 1964

Southern Region Vice President for Six-State Rally Association
Lone Star Chapter FMCA Past President
South Central Lucky Rollers
Rally in The Pasture


#17 cmarq

cmarq

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 77 posts
  • Location:Connecticut

Posted 16 December 2013 - 07:22 PM

I don't have a diesel with air brakes, The park brake is on the driveshaft and I don't trust them. Even park on the trans.is not fail proof.  I don't use them when we are parked level and jacks down but I do if on an incline or underneath doing services.  I spent 40 years working on and around trucks and heavy equipment. It is a false sense of security if you think it is impossible to happen. The DOT requires wheel chocks in commerical vehicles and most companies require drivers to chock wheels air brakes or no. I fit mine on either side of jenny.


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users