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Replace Duals With Super Single Tires


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11 replies to this topic

#1 SnowT

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 09:07 PM

Hi new to Forum's, planing and Doing a heap of reading on RV's and Truck's..

 

One of the issue that I have been doing a heap of reading on is the economic of driving large RV's/truck's over distance..

 

 

I'm not sure if you have come across this site..

http://www.airflowtruck.com/

 

 

Well I did and some of the ideas that has been posted here sound very Good..

 

So the Question is...

 

Has anyone replaced or seen an RV that has replaced the original RV dual rear tires with a Super Single tire.??.

 

 

Juergen

 

Psst

I would Love to see a Large RV on the Road that uses the above mentioned design..

 


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#2 WhiteEagle

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 10:01 PM

One major concern with going to only one tire rather than dual is if... if you do have a failure / blowout, you have no possible way to avoid major damage even beyond just replacing a tire ??


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#3 Markstella

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 07:04 AM

I see that it seems to be a trend with trucks today.  It has to save $$ on toll roads.  I'm thinking they run cooler then the smaller single tire.  Also, the ride must be smoother.  I'm sure that it will hit the RV market some day.


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#4 TBUTLER

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:09 PM

I haven't encountered any toll roads that charge by tire, all that I have seen charge by the number of axles and that wouldn't change.  I don't think I have seen trucks running with the super single anywhere except with dual axles.  In that case, after a blow out three tires would remain and would keep the trailer from going down to the rim if stopped in time.  Also, a blow out on a truck doesn't cause the kind of damage that a blow out on a motor home can cause.

 

I would hesitate to go to a single tire with our coach, we only have one set of duals on the rear and no tag so a flat would leave us running on the rim in the rear.  With that weight I would imagine that it would destroy the rim and who knows what else.  We had a flat (blow  out) on the rear last year and it took out about 15 feet of fiberglass around and behind the wheel position.  I think I'll stick with the duals.


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After 9 1/2 years full time in our motor home and being Winter Texans we are now living at Sandpipers Resort in Edinburg, Texas. Now we are Summer Chickens!

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#5 desertdeals69

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 02:35 PM

I believe that it only comes in one diameter so if it is not your size it could present some problems.
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#6 Tireman9

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 02:29 PM

Super single, which I believe is a trade name, is not a new technology asa I worked on similar tire designs in early 70's. The main issue is that the cost of replacing tires & wheels when used does not work out but if the vehicle manufacturer applies new the saving in fuel does pay for the added up front cost when you are looking at the life of a set of truck duals.

 

I don't think we will see this option be of value till diesel get higher due to RV shorter life.


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#7 bsmi021b

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 07:57 PM

Ok folks since most of us here running a motorhome are not fulltime or long haul drivers I went to the real source about this issue of singles or duals, now all of you need to understand I did not know the real answer either but I think the people who run them all over the US might so read about this topic at www.overdriveonline.com/readers-mixed-on-wide-single-tires/ And see how to answer this with real info and help.


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#8 timthecarguy

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 10:04 AM

I have a 38 ft country coach with super singles on it they are Goodyear 445  and they are fantastic smother ride and I ran a 4000 mile run on them no problem. Could you have a problem running a single tire, sure but from what I have learned they are a stronger better tire than singles and RV'ers don't run the weight or the demand on a tire that otr truckers do.

 

I see the super singles on a lot of big rigs and a lot of fuel delivery tankers, if they are safe for fuel delivery they are probably safe for my coach and no they are not a 1000 each they run around 5 - 600 a tire and good luck trying to wear a set out and the bonus is they look cool as a nascar coming at ya I love my super singles  happy clamping to all.

 

Timthecarguy 


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#9 Allegiance40x

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Posted 05 February 2015 - 06:12 PM

The problem I see is that if we have a super single and it fails...we have nothing.  If an 18 wheeler has a set of super singles and one fails, he still has one to at least get him off the road.


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#10 C012924

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 05:52 PM

Semi trucks use these tires for two reasons. Fuel economy and weight. A semi will have about a thousand pounds difference in there light weight than with duals. Fuel savings are also a factor. In a motorhome application.....stick to duals. A major concern can be tire availability. If you have a tire issue in a rural area a 445/50/22.5 more than likely won't be available. At a thousand dollars per tire not every tire store is going to stock that tire. A road hazard that causes a tire failure for a 445/50/22.5  AKA super single will usually result in wheel replacement. In a single wheel application the tire goes flat your then riding on your wheel which results in a ruined wheel. Cost of wheel....around $500.00.


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#11 WILDEBILL308

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Posted 22 June 2015 - 08:51 PM

C012924,

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

You might have a problem getting one in a rural area but I don't see how it would be any different than a flat on the front?

 

Bill


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#12 jleamont

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 06:37 AM

C012924,

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

You might have a problem getting one in a rural area but I don't see how it would be any different than a flat on the front?

 

Bill

Good point Bill!

I would be more concerned with axle weight distribution from a single vs. Dual, the expense of changing wheel bearings or possibly hubs to accommodate the new offset. Most people fail to realize your axle housing, Hubs and bearings are all different when Super Singles are spec’d. If you are trying to lighten up for fuel economy change the inner wheel to aluminum. Also keep in mind traction can be a concern in bad weather including rain with the singles. I do not believe in this application the positives would outweigh the negatives.

Traction is always the complaint I hear at work and we only run them if we are trying to hit a specific axle weight rating for permits and that is our last option.


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