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CO Detectors


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#1 e6a6h666

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 12:19 PM

Why do I need a special RV-designated CO detector rather than one advertised for home use? How is an RV detector different?


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#2 desertdeals69

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Posted 11 October 2013 - 08:30 PM

I have a standard house detector in mine.


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#3 turtlemechanic

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 07:40 AM

We have 2 residential type; one in front and one in the bedroom (a door separates the 2 zones) also have 2 smoke detectors (one in each zone)

 

each zone has it's own door to the outside also.

 

Also we have a typical Residential Vehicle.


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#4 huffypuff

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 12:41 AM

All of the RVs I owned the co detector turned off the propane if it sense a leak.  Something to think about.


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At Redmond, OR

 

 

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#5 wolfe10

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 07:18 AM

Ray,

 

You might want to check, but I suspect it is a propane detector that activates a solenoid that allows propane into the coach.

 

Brett


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#6 huffypuff

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 09:54 AM

I guess I was thinking about a combination unit as in this link.  Thats what I have and feel more safe with it.  Sometimes a pain at the beginning of the season for it to reset on the 93 I had.  

 

http://www.dyersonli...-detectors.html


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At Redmond, OR

 

 

Ray & Hana Huffman

2006 Holiday Rambler, Ambassador PLQ 40' 10" 

2006 Jeep Liberty Limited CRD used as toad

2012 Cadillac SRX4

1976 Cadillac Coupe deVille

2009 7,000 lbs Carhauler Trailer


#7 thrushl

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 12:37 PM

Why do I need a special RV-designated CO detector rather than one advertised for home use? How is an RV detector different?

 

I have both types and I don't see there is a difference OTHER THAN the one rated for RV has been tested to function trough the rough travel of a RV.  At least that is what I have been told.


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#8 HamRadioHFMobile

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 04:40 PM

Good morning, Ray - huffypuff;  

 

     I have an observation on the subject of "combination CO-propane detectors." 

 

     I am not sure that I can recommend them. 

 

     The optimum location for a CO (Carbon monOxide) detector is up high, and the CO gas, being also a by-product of incomplete combustion, is lighter than air and will rise and collect up near the ceiling. 

 

     The optimum location for a propane detector is down low, and the propane gas is heavier than air and will collect down near the floor. 

 

     The optimum location for one gas will be the worst location for the other.  They have conflicting operational requirements for a detection system. 

 

     For that reason, I chose to go with two separate type units in my motor home; one propane detector down low near the floor in the galley area where the heater is also located, and one separate CO detector up near the ceiling also in the galley area.  There is also a smoke detector in the ceiling in the living room area just forward of the galley area. 

 

     Then there is another smoke detector and a second CO detector both in the ceiling back in the rear bedroom. 

 

     Also, the propane detector is powered with a separate, fused, constant 12 VDC power source connected to the coach batteries. My propane detector is an audible alarm unit only; it is not interconnected with the propane supply line.  Well, at least not at this time. 

 

          Enjoy; 

 

          Ralph 

          Latte Land, Washington 


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