motorcyclist

Looking For Feedback On Super C

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We are purchasing a new motorhome and looking for feedback on Dynamax and Renegade.

How is the quality of the unit -response from the factory etc. - The chassis is Freightliner M2 with the Cummins 350hp.

We are looking at the Dynamax XL340 and Renegade Explorer.

Any comments would be helpful.

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ticat900   

Pretty expensive for what you get. Pushers are a lot nicer and better priced.

But depends if you like the truck front style etc.

Different strokes for different folks as they say.

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Yes, I do like the look of the super C but more importantly is the easy access to the engine compartment for servicing and ease of checking fluids etc-being a true truck chassis. The amount of Freightliner service centers around the US adds a level of comfort while traveling.

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motorcyclist,

I have a diesel pusher and love it. Plenty of storage in the basement and very stable on the road. One thing to consider is resale, there are a lot more DP's out there which tells you something. A super C does have a much more limited demand vs a DP.

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Robert19   

After 4 DP's and years of being the one to service them ,I just got tired at 64 of taking care of them. We felt we had to have the coach because of our kids, the dogs. Sold our 50th HR Edition and bought a 32' Gulf Stream Limited Class C gas V10 used.

Found out we did not need all the room after all and love the drive of the C. Should have done it years ago.

The Kids are just fine with it also.

Robert19

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bm02tj   

I run and am happy with my 1816MG Renegade. because it is the only type you can have a garage in the back for my Jeep TJ

and you can have fixed or serviced at any truck shop. I have people asking to call them if I want to sell and I just say sorry.

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jcmoore   

I have a dynamax dynaquest 34xl and love it. Very nice to drive,handles great in cross winds very stable. 10.5 miles to the gallon towing a jeep. Fully loaded I weigh 27600lbs with a GVWR of 33000lbs so lots of room to spare. Very good quality unit. Real cabinets etc. We like the saftey of the engine up front and great access to the engine for maintainence, inspection etc. We are going full time so are going to purchase a larger unit around 40ft. We will stay with dynamax but know Renegrade is of equal quality. Good Luck in your search

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eb22352   

You mentioned that a positive for buying a Super C was wide availability of Freightliner service centers for servicing the chassis. Not sure why you feel that is only true for Super C's. A large percentage (if not majority) of DP's are built on Freightliners and are serviceable at Freightliner truck centers.

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We felt many of the same concerns already mentioned when comparing class A to class C. More difficult to service, less places 'happy' to provide service, etc. So we went the super C route, we have a 40' Showhauler (http://showhauler.com/home) on a Freightliner Columbia chasis. Being build on an over the road truck chassis it is designed and layed out for someone to be full time in the drivers seat, good handling, easy to drive, very stable on the road, etc. Plus I can do much of the service myself. Other considerations are the towing and cargo carrying capacities. Many of the class A units we looked at were limited in one or the other or both. Any super C on a Freightliner chassis we looked at had plenty of capacity for towing and carrying cargo. Note, this does not apply to many of the smaller C's build on a smaller chassis, many of these were quite limited as well.

There are plenty of good class A units out there, but after doing the research and comparisons it was an easy decision for us to go to the super C.

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cowboy66   

BlueFlame,

That is a nice looking unit. We felt the same way about the super C route.

We are happy so far with ours. But that is not for every one that is the reason we have many styles to pick from.

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Blueflame,

I share your thoughts about the Super C. A service manager at a Freightliner Service Center mentioned to make sure when we go in for service-emergency or normal-tell the center that it is on an M2 chasis. Some of the same services on a DP can take longer and is not sometimes viewed favorably by the tech doing the work.

The easy access to the engine makes viewing/checking fluids etc easy and will typically result in a willingness to check them. The DP has its advantages it all comes down to personal preference.

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cowboy66   

Motorcyclist,

Thanks for the tip that is good to know.

I don't see what kind of motor home you ended up getting.

I am going to get spare filters to keep with us.

Is their any think more we should have on hand?

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wolfe10   

Cowboy66,

In addition to two sets of fuel filters, a good idea to carry a set of belts and one oil filter. Make sure to rotate spares so oldest is used and new ones go into spares use.

You can get someone to install these items anywhere in the world, but may not be able to find the correct part.

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Great Idea. Spares are what "keeps America rolling". :) I did purchase a Dynamax XL360. Haven't had much time to give a real good laymans opinion-I will in time. So far it drives great-highway and tight areas. The Cummins 350hp-1000 lbs torque seems to be a great match.

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bm02tj   

The Freightliner dealer at home posted they only do warranty work on motorhomes, no non warranty work but said mine is OK because it is a real truck.

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cowboy66   

I have not talked to the Freightliner dealer near us but am going to try and get their next week to by some parts so will see what he has to say about working on it.

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obedb   

If I could have a do-over, I would have bought a Super C. Easier to service yourself or anywhere trucks are worked on. Give us enough room for two people , two cats, and necessary cargo. We no longer dry camp. RV parks are safer.

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jleamont   

We had a Regular C or "Mini" 31' on a Ford chassis as our first RV. I loved the cab feel and the ease of maintenance. Since I have worked on both in the past for a living (chassis at a dealer) I felt more comfortable with the purchase of the C. With the problems we had with RV body/cab mounting you would have to work very hard to sell me another "C", that left a bad taste in my mouth. If our's was the only one I saw or heard of with the problems listed below I would be willing to give it another try but we were just another one in the crowd with the same complaints.

We had so many problems with the cab moving at a different rate than the body (two different manufactures engineer's trying for a common goal was a failure) causing the front body wall to fail where the cab mounted, bunk starting to fail from the weight overhanging the cab with inadequate support. It was a nice unit in the beginning but time and the nice roads we drive on placed one heck of a beating on that poor coach.

I have two friends now with C's one with a mini (31' on a Ford 2010 model year with 20k miles) and another on a Freightliner (2011 with 40,000 miles), both are just starting to have structural failure, the Fleetwood (mini) started first with a rear wall splitting and the roof shearing the mounting screws off where the bunk attached from the chassis twist and the Dynamax (Super) has started with the front wall to cab mounting.

While I do love the ease of maintenance, the car/truck feel from the drivers seat and the look I will never do that again, its hard to get one engineering team to talk to each other and develop a good design that will last, trying to get two that have never met to discuss chassis and cab deflection is impossible.

Do super C's have air suspension in the front now, just curious?

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obedb   

I doubt it. I remember when Peterbilt tried that as an option. Didn't go over well. I remember talking to a driver that ran one for a small fleet. He said that it really had a hard ride, but that was late nineties. Perhaps it has been perfected. My Western Star rode really well when pulling an air ride trailer. Perhaps a Super C with air bags in the rear would ride well. The current issue of MotorHome has a big spread on Super's. Out of my price range.

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obedb   

Joe

There are several manufacturers of very large aftermarket sleepers. They are expensive and seem to last for years. Bolted to a stretched out W900, Pete, or the T600 series (up to 660 now) they sure look sharp and they are used harder than a recreational SuperC. Perhaps the manufacturers of RVs should visit some of them to see how they do it? I was close to buying one that was mounted behind a Western Star (used) , but the price was above what I wanted to pay. Couldn't find a flaw though.

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jleamont   

Funny you mentioned that. The RV front wall is Fiberglass reinforced Plywood; tractors with sleepers and ambulances are aluminum or metal of some sort. The FRP construction is cheap and you know what the saying is "you get what you pay for".

I believe that it would work if they took on the technology the truck body companies use when the build a cut a way chassis truck. They actually order the chassis with the same mounts down the frame as the cab is mounted with additional mount insulators. Basically the cab and box is attached and sitting on the frame with the same mounts going from the front to the back, same with Ambulances, they just have an all aluminum box. One main difference is the overall length, the longer the frame the more of a twisting action you get, plus all of the Class C RV's I have seen are mounted to the chassis frame with no body cushion mounts just bolted or welded directly to the frame, so while the cab is on rubber and the chassis is moving under it the RV body is fighting to hold the cab in place, also while the chassis is trying to flex the RV body is holding it in place and sending all of that energy through the coach body which is this is where the failure starts.

When we were having our problems I started to do research to see if I could correct the poor design. After years at a dealer swapping new ambulance chassis to the old body and working on Cut A Way chassis in general it was obvious to me where the ball had dropped. I actually called two truck body manufactures and went up to look over a few, good to know people that explained to me the Ford and GM supplied this as an option to them that they always order. In previous years (25+ ago) they did not and were experiencing the same problems we were having. I guess it is the old "buyer beware", we had the front wall fixed again and I traded it in, just had enough.

You probably remember the sleepers that had the accordion gasket between the cab and sleeper, that’s why, even back then truck manufactures and truck body companies had it figured out.

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