Jump to content


Photo
* * * * - 1 votes

How To Know I値l Adapt To Full-timing?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 99phantoms

99phantoms

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts

Posted 16 January 2014 - 04:22 AM

Taking steps now to retire in Sep ’15 (age 65) and begin a full-timing lifestyle for 5-7 yrs planned, probably with the girlfriend.  Intend to sell house & most possessions, and put remainder in long-term storage.

Still looking, but am expecting summer after next to purchase a large DP, such as Allegro Bus, Anthem, Dutch Star, American Tradition, etc.

I’ve never been in a moving RV.  Friends & family are throwing up the caution flags for me to try it out first.  But how?  Seems renting a representative Class A DP for 30 days or so could cost north of $15k?

So… how can I know this isn’t just another impetuous phase I’m going through (like that big Harley)?  And how can I give full-timing a honest look-see without actually doing it?… and without breaking the bank?

Would really appreciate hearing about your thoughts and experiences as you were contemplating the decision to go full-time.  How did you know you’d adapt?  How did you know you wouldn’t just get sick of it?  How did you know?

Also wondering… do you know anyone that actually tried it, but did not like it?


(btw, anyone want to buy a motorcycle?)


  • 0

#2 wolfe10

wolfe10

    Advanced Member

  • Moderator, Super
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,760 posts
  • Location:League City, Texas

Posted 16 January 2014 - 08:09 AM

Any major lifestyle change is a "crap-shoot." Some adapt more easily, some are more rigid-- neither is right or wrong, just better/worse fit.

 

Doesn't matter if you are talking about full timing in an RV, sailboat or moving to a foreign country.

 

I am not sure there is a "10 steps" to evaluating how you would adapt to the change. 

 

I don't see renting an RV (or chartering a sail boat) as "representative of the lifestyle".  It would still be all new to you, you would be in the steepest part of the learning curve, etc.

 

Wish I could offer more assurance.

 

BTW, Dianne and I have done two year sailing trips as well as roughly half of each year now in the motorhome.  Dianne will not give up here land base, so for us full timing (right now) would not work. Not good or bad -- just what works for us.


  • 0

Dianne and Brett Wolfe
1997 Safari Sahara 3540
Moderator, FMCA.com Forums
Chairman, FMCA Technical Advisory Committee
Member, FMCA Long-Range and Development Committee 2007-2009
Moderator, http://www.dieselrvclub.org/(FMCA chapter)


#3 Medico

Medico

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 207 posts
  • Location:Where ever the front of the coach takes us!
  • I travel:Full-time in my motorhome

Posted 16 January 2014 - 08:25 AM

You might try to rent an RV for a trip to see if you like the lifestyle. Unfortunately it is not quite the same, because the availability of different type units is somewhat limited, but it may give you an indication if you like it.

 

Personally, I like the freedom it gives us. If we do not like a particular area where we are, we pick up and leave, without leaving a trace behind. If a severe weather alert threatens, we pick up and move out of the path.

 

The biggest drawback, as I see it, is that you have to live with less space, and consequently less stuff than you might be accustomed to. Downsizing can be traumatic at first! You do adapt quickly however. Humans are very adaptable.

 

Good luck! We love this lifestyle!


  • 0

FMCA #F431170, GS #822128658, Escapees SKP #112655

 

2006 Country Coach Magna (525 HP Cat C13 1650 torque, Alison 4000 6 speed tranny), 2012 Jeep Liberty

 

 

CountryCoachMagna1med_zps83669550.jpg


#4 kaypsmith

kaypsmith

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 343 posts
  • Location:Hueytown, Al
  • I travel:With Pets

Posted 16 January 2014 - 12:24 PM

Best investment i made concerning rv'ing was, a small gas class A motorhome. I paid $5000.00 for that jewel, used a few weekends, then longer stays. We liked the lifestyle, but as you can guess, the unit was too small. I found a larger unit, sold the origional, and enjoyed the larger one even more. When the bug really hit me, I bought a retired Greyhound, spent 3 years designing the conversion and building it just the way my wife and wanted it. We love what we have now, and no expense was spared during the conversion. Different strokes for different folks, but what I'm saying is, there are ways to test the water before jumping off of the cliff. Hope you find that you love full timing, but I recommend testing the water.

 

Good luck in your endeavors,

 

Kay


  • 0

#5 lmsooter

lmsooter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 170 posts
  • Location:Mayhill, New Mexico
  • I travel:With Pets, Full-time in my motorhome

Posted 17 January 2014 - 10:55 AM

We purchased a small 33 foot gasoline model in 2009 for weekend use and to test the waters.  We enjoyed it so much we spent the next 2 years learning as much as we could about the RV lifestyle and looking at larger units.  We attended an FMCA convention to take advantage of excellent seminars and to look at motorhomes.  Every opportunity we had was used to look at units to develop our list of wants and needs.  Finally in June 2011 we made our decision of the coach that most met our requirements.  In November 2011 we sold the house and drove away.  We went to Canada and Alaska in 2012 and spent about 4 months on the road going up and coming back.  We have never regretted our decision.

 

As the old saying goes "try it before you buy it".  We went from around 3000 square feet to a little less than 400 but it works for us.  Try renting a unit for a weekend or two to see if you really are interested in RVing.  If you like it, rent for a week or two and try a longer trip.  Talk to people you meet in the campgrounds - RVers are a very friendly group.

 

Make a list of places you would like to see if you do decide to full-time. What do you really want to do when you retire? 

 

Just take your time and take advantage of the information that is out there. 


  • 0
Leary and Sandra Sooter
2006 Alfa See Ya
2005 Jeep Liberty Renegade
Roadmaster Falcon 2 Towbar
Brake Buddy Vantage

#6 Larry196

Larry196

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 101 posts
  • Location:Tulalip,WA
  • I travel:Full-time in my motorhome

Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:27 AM

<p>All the planning in the world is a great idea (generally).</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Wife and I bought an old '88 24-footer, went weekends for two years, spent most of the time&nbsp;fixing things, then we bought a '99 35 footer and retired.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>We ran around Wash and Ore. for a year and&nbsp; decided we would jump off the cliff, sell everything and go for the big trip.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>We bought a 40-foot Holiday Rambler, and set off. We got about a month into heading south and one night my wife fell backwards out of the coach, from the top step.</p>
<p>We are now parked in northern Wash. Looks like for good.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Don't over plan. Make some short trips, see if you love each other as much as you think. If it looks good JUMP and have fun.</p>
  • 0
Do something every day that scares you - even if just a little bit.
Larry and Rita F428262

#7 99phantoms

99phantoms

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts

Posted 29 January 2014 - 01:14 AM

My Goodness!  Best wishes to your wife for a speedy recovery.

 

And thank-you for your feedback... and to everyone else whose advice has been invaluable.  Thanks to all.


  • 1

#8 BillAdams

BillAdams

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 301 posts
  • Location:Traveling full time
  • I travel:With Pets, Full-time in my motorhome

Posted 24 February 2014 - 06:17 PM

How much do you like your girlfriend?  No, that's not sarcasm!  Do you like being really close for long periods of time?  Do you spend the day in one part of the house and her in another?  Do you like being around each other nearly all day everyday?  Are you willing and able to make new friends at the longer term destinations and then leave them only to make new ones at the next stop?  Are you at least ever so slightly handy when it comes to working on things you would find in an RV as well as so basic engine/transmission "stuff"?  If not, add a few extra percentages to your monthly budget.  You will likely want to tow a vehicle with you if you buy a motor home or you will want the truck you use to tow a trailer to be comfortable enough for you both to drive to Wal-Mart and sightseeing when necessary.

 

Do you have any special interests or hobbies?  If so, are you willing to give them up or are they things you could do, maybe even enhance, while on the road?  Have any pets?  If so, will they handle the RV OK?  If you really plan on 5-7 years on the road you might want to consider the cost of storage for the items you think you "can't" get rid of.  Could family use them instead or keep them in case you ever need them again?

 

Just a couple of thoughts from a 17 year full-timer!


  • 0

Bill

F192XXX


#9 TBUTLER

TBUTLER

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,383 posts
  • Location:At Cummins Southern Plains in San Antonio for service before parking for the winter!

Posted 25 February 2014 - 02:36 AM

We've been ten years full time, have a home base now where we spent every winter.  The motor home is parked next to the house.  I read, studied, planned and we did it.  Still, there was no way to explain what it is like.  You have to be full time to really appreciate the benefits and challenges. 

 

There are a hundred different ways to go full time.  Some people move rarely and simply use it as a cheap way to live.  Some work-camp and travel only a few times a year.  We parked each winter for about 5 months in a nice warm, friendly place and then we traveled the rest of the year, visiting family, sightseeing, making small trips or big trips.  We love to travel and covered almost all of Canada and all the US except for the island state.  When our parents (mothers) had health problems we were able to go park next to their house and give them the attention they needed.  They still had the privacy of their house, we were just next door.  We've done the same with our children, giving them assistance, taking care of grandchildren during challenging times for their parents.  We've taken the grandchildren on trips and traveled to visit friends and relatives in distant states. 

 

Both parties have to be equally adaptable and committed to making it work because it will require extensive changes in the way you live.  Some people are comfortable being completely on their own, no one knowing exactly where they are at any give time, others need some kind of anchor.  As Bill said, you will face compatibility challenges due to the confined space and limited ability to get away from one another.  Talk it over, read accounts from a variety of people here on the FMCA Forum and then decide if you want to take the leap.

 

By the way, a good used coach is a good way to try it out without the expense of purchasing a brand new shiny coach.  Easy in and easy out!


  • 0

Tom and Louise Butler
2004 Monaco Windsor, Cummins 400 ISL
Roadmaster Sterling Tow Bar, Brakemaster, GMC Acadia, BikeE Recumbent Bicycles

After 9 1/2 years full time in our motor home and being Winter Texans we are now living at Sandpipers Resort in Edinburg, Texas. Now we are Summer Chickens!

"The tipi is much better to live in; always clean and warm in winter, cool in summer, easy to move... If the Great Spirit wanted men to live in one place he would have made the world stand still." -- Flying Hawk, South Dakota Oglala Sioux


#10 99phantoms

99phantoms

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts

Posted 25 February 2014 - 09:51 AM

You guys are more helpful than I could have imagined.  Thanks to all.


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users