gbellar

Water Pressure Regulator: Built-in or Add to Hose?

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I have a 2012 Tiffin Allegro Bus. Does it have a built-in water pressure regulator or do I need to put one on my hose? Seems like when I have the regulator on my hose, I don't have much pressure. Am I doubling up on regulators? Thanks. Gary B

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You are probably not doubling up, but the small regulators restrict the flow to a significant degree. I have found two things that help to keep water pressure up inside the coach: 1. Make sure you use a 5/8 inch interior measurement hose, and 2. Use a home style regulator. You can buy a Watts regulator at any Loews or Home Depot with the right pressure you desire. Not only is this better protection, but it does not noticeably restrict the water flow. I have used this for several years, and with the regulator set to 45 lbs., I have great pressure in the RV.

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Are you concerned with pressure or flow? I bought my regulator from the RV Water Filter Store several years ago and I regulate the pressure to 60#.

http://www.rvwaterfilterstore.com/PressureRegulators.htm

Edit: To answer your question, I doubt there is a built -n regulator but I would think if you call Tiffin or join the Tiffin RV Forum you can get a quick answer.

http://www.tiffinrvnetwork.com/

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I like this unit which can be attached at the spigot to protect the hose and the interior plumbing. http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/item/adjustable-water-regulator-lead-free/49511 My coach does have an internal Watts regulator so I don't use the above unit but I likely should if I wanted to keep my hoses in the best shape possible. For me, I would rather buy a new hose from time to time. I am only saying that if you do not have a built in regulator you really do need one and the cheapo #45 regulators restrict the flow so badly you will hate having them in line.

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Keep in mind, no matter if there is a regulator built in or not, you will need to regulate the pressure from the spigot on. I made the mistake of putting my regulator at the input to my coach one time, and the high pressure in the park blew a hole in my hose.

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I don't claim to know much about plumbing, but my husband and I are struggling with water pressure inside our 2012 Winnebago Journey 42E. We've tried the camping world pressure reducer (45#), and then purchased an adjustable regulator, which helped, but we're constantly having to readjust it when the pressure drops again. We're curious about this Watts regulator.... Can't learn much on the Home Depot web site, since we don't know which one you'd be recommending? Would you mind explaining about it in a bit more depth? Would sure appreciate the help!

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The watts regulator I use was purchased at Home Depot. It is intended for home use, but it can be adjusted to about any psi you desire. I mounted mine along with a pressure gauge, also purchased at Home Depot, and adjusted the output pressure to 45 pounds. The main thing about the regulator is that there is very little restriction to the water flow. I also use a 5/8 in. inside diameter hose. The 1/2 in. hoses restrict the flow of water too much.

Someone mentioned that they blew out their hose from the camp water pressure. I have been using the same hose for about 3 years without any problem ever, and it is mounted in front of the regulator.

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A Watts cannot increase pressure if the campground pressure goes to heck. It can only reduce incoming over pressure water to a safe level.

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Before I decide whether or not to use a regulator, which restricts flow, I test the campground's water pressure with a Watts DP IWTG Water Pressure Test Gauge for Garden Hoses, available from Amazon for less than $12.00. I've found the gauge to be highly accurate, but it must be protected from freezing temperatures even if it's not hooked up or it'll be ruined. To constantly monitor the water pressure, I use a "Y" connector at the faucet.

My hoses will withstand up to 120 psi, but I don't allow more than 60 psi to go into my coach. The gauge is also helpful if I'm trying to diagnose low-flow problems. At one campground their pressure was just 17 psi, which was woefully inadequate for taking a shower. My solution was to use my coach's water pump to boost the pressure.

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I use the Valterra adjustable regulator with gauge, about $60. It's shape is a better fit in my water bay, where it is permanently connected. I bought my hoses at the Water Filter Store, and don't worry about pressure damaging them. I had a Watts whole-house filter but wasn't happy with the size and weight. Plus the Valterra is plug and play, no need to add hose adapters.

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