ultraglide

Tools Needed for Full-Timing

49 posts in this topic

My wife and I will be starting our full-time motorhoming adventure soon. Like by the end of August. Does anyone have thoughts about tools that I may need? I already have the normal stuff like screwdrivers, hammers, sockets, and the like. Would you also think what size of tool box would be good? Thanks.

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Good question. But, quite a bit of the answer depends on your skill level. For some, a couple of screwdrivers and wrenches are "past their pay grade".

Others carry a full complement of tools.

I would certainly recommend carrying enough tools to change routine components such as belts, hoses and fuel filters. If you have the tools to do that, even if you don't have the knowledge, with tools at hand, you can probably find someone to help.

Same with carrying normal breakdown parts, including two sets of fuel filters, belts, spare for each fluid. Noticing that hydraulic fluid level is low in a CG is painless if you have the proper fluid along. It is requires a drive into town and search on Sunday afternoon, quite a different matter.

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ultiaglide,

I happen to be a tool nut. (so my wife says). So in most cases I have what I need and enough to help a fellow RVer make a repair. I have a complete Tool Box in my compartment slide. Jumper Cables, Extra Belts and Wiper Blades ( I always keep the old ones I take off just in case), extra Fuel Filters, a Cordless drill with drill bits and a Air Hose with Pressure Gauge. But as I said I am a tool nut.

Good Luck,

Herman

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Thank you. Never thought about some of the items mentioned.

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I have just about the same tools that Herman stated. The only addition I have is a compartment case that I got at a big box store. In it is light bulbs, fuses, electrical crimp connectors, screws, extra magnets for my windshield sunscreen, etc. Buy one much larger than you think you will need. As your experience grows so does the miscellaneous items you will think you will need for spares.

I also carry a 3 gallon 150 # pancake air compressor and 50 feet of 1/4 very flexible air hose.

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Herman,

Looks like you are not the only tool nut. I have the items you list plus those listed by mrboyer. Included in my case is heat shrink tubing, water hose washers, water hose repair fittings. I also carry a 30amp extension, extra water hose and sewer hose extension.

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I carry a "free with purchase" VOM (volt ohm meter) from Harbor Freight. Also carry a kit with crimping plires and misc. wire connectors. Also, don't forget duct tape. I carry a fuse and bulb selection for the MH in addition to misc fasteners for both wood and metal. I also carry motor oil, transmission fluid (recommended for my leveling system), antifreeze, RV antifreeze, car wash soap, car polish, a battery charger, Silicone spray, WD-40, and a wide selection of hand tools. I also carry a four foot ladder and an air compressor (150 PSIG). As far as how to carry, look at available space and look at a number of smaller containers that will fit in space available. A plastic tray is good for the "wet" items in case they leak. A canvas tool bag might be a good choice for your misc. hand tools. Leave room for the necessary pots and pans. ;-)

Sam

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I also carry what a lot of you have mentioned. I went to Wal-Mart, bought 2 fishing tackle boxes. One has all of the compartments I need for light bulbs, fuses, wire ends, heat shrink, screws, washers, etc. Volt meter, Scotch 88 tape and other larger items fit nicely in the bottom. All in a handy-dandy carry case. Now, the other fishing tackle box I use as a First Aid kit. Compartments in the top hold band aids, spot type, knuckle type, large, small and medium band aids. It also holds the crush type Merthiolate swabs, ammonia inhalants for the fainting spells when you see the price at the pump and other goodies. The larger items like tape, scissors, elastic wraps, large gauze pads, salve etc. can go in the bottom. As far as packing everything in a RV, I had a VW Beetle in college and if you had one of those, you learned how to pack!!!

Wishing each of you smooth highways with no pot holes or orange barrels and a strong tailwind.

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We subscribe to a breakdown service, so don't carry the kinds of heavy tools that would be necessary to service a motorhome engine or transmission, but we do carry a road cone and reflecting triangles (to warn others if we breakdown), WD-40, screwdrivers, pliers, both socket and open-end wrench sets, crescent wrench, Allen wrench set, wire crimper, electric drill and bit set, both a digital and an analog volt/ohm/milliamp (VOM) meter, tire pressure gauge, tire inflator with gauge, small 2.8 cfm 150 psi air compressor with air hose, a fluorescent work-light and a couple of 50-foot 20-amp extension cords. We also carry a full-size shovel and leveling blocks which we've used to pry up our hydraulic lifts when they've misbehaved.

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Regardless of what you carry Murphy dictates you will not have what you need. However, try to arm yourself with stuff that will keep you moving on the road. Like, a compressor, battery cables, a variety of fluids, wire, rope, electrical meter and lots of duct and electrical tape. Adjustable wrenches and screw drivers are a given. Your best 2 tools will be your cell phone and roadside service card. Good service habits are also valuable.

Safe Travels---------------------------Bonehead

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One of the most important tools in a motorhome is YOU. A reflective vest or two are very important out there on the boulevard.

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A lot of good suggestions and tools/parts and wire ends and extra bulbs etc. I have been RVing since 1974 and always bring a LOT of tools and spare parts. One thing i have found to be very valuable is a medium size tool box that i have loaded with fasteners, screws/bolts/mics sized nuts/washer (locking and flat) some bailing wire and misc. small parts i just might need.

I enjoy helping other RVers on the road or in a CG. For that reason i carry probably more than i need.

And a word of advice. Was leaving a CG in Californina years ago and there was an RV that had cut a corner short and had a pretty good sized tree limb sticking through the broken window. He had been there for about an half an hour and was totally lost as to how he was going to get free of the tree.

He didn't have a saw or an ax so i helped him out with the saw i ALWAYS carry. A hack saw and a carpenter saw do add to the inventory but when needed they are most valuable.

Happy motoring with God's blessing.

Gizmo.

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Excellent ideas here. Common sense will be your most valuable tool and keeping up with the posts here from the sharper fellows. My $0.02:

1.) If your MH has air brakes, obviously you have an compressor unless your engine is dead. Make sure you or the dealer installs an air outlet quick-connection.

2.) Good quality cordless drills also have available good quality work lights, I have a Dewalt fluorescent. A good quality light can be invaluable.

3.) I am not a big fan of the large tool boxes with drawers even though I have one, my favourite method mentioned above are the canvass (Klein) or synthetic fabric tool bags (Craftsman) of various sizes, I have three of those. Klein also has the smaller canvas pouches I use for the smaller stuff. The fishing tackle boxes are a good idea if you have the space.

4.) Various size zip ties.

Good luck, Mark

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Some great ideas from various members. I carry several small inexpensive plastic boxes like fishing tackle boxes also. They are very handy and easy to store. one has lots of fuses, another bulbs, and others have all of those misc. screws and fasteners that come in handy. Whenever I need a part or bulb, I always buy 2 or 3 and keep the spare for on the road. I also keep a hatchet, small shovel, and lopping shears for trimming any low hanging small branches that may scratch my unit. I keep 2 plastic tool boxes. One has the small most likely to use tools and the other has tools that are seldom needed but nice to have. I agree with the writer that suggests a handy canvas tool bag. In that I keep a bunch of handy small tools so I can work easily anywhere. I do keep a pencil type soldering iron and solder which has been handy. If you don't have something, chances are someone in a Campground does. Assorted Ty-wraps are must also. All of this stuff adds weight and space so I do try to keep things to a minimum. I like having several small containers versus a big box as they are easier to pack. Great idea for the safety vest. I will add that to my coach. I believe reflective triangles may be required by law depending on your size.

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Finding it interesting the gentlemen are not addressing emotional tools which I would think essential.....patience, understanding, God's hand on my shoulder and over my mouth! We are new to RVing and in rainy weather it can feel a bit tight. Considering a 2 month stay in FL winter 2015. If I cannot convince the spouse to rent a park model, we will be giving the full time a test for those two months. We also travel with 2 forty pound dogs who insist the sofa is theirs.

Jan Mobley

Knoxville, TN

1999 Winnebago Chieftain

Towing 2011 GMC Terrain

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I have just about every tool necessary to fix anything on my Blue Bird, except overhaul the engine! A 3 drawer tool box with every tool I have ever needed to work on the old Bird. Extra compressor, all large sockets and wrenches I have used to change out all air bags, replace air brake actuators, air lines, air gun, lug nut sockets, wrenches to remove and replace the semi truck tires used on the Blue Birds. Installed new jacks, hydraulic jack pump and tank, new jack control valve. Replaced the air step with an electric one. Replaced most water fixtures, new propane heaters, installed one new roof air to replace one basement air that just died. Took some parts from that one to keep the other two working. (New roof air is really great, but a lot noiser than the old basement unit) Next project is replacing the fabric on the awnings.. Just hope the wife likes the new awning colors........ The only thing I have yet to do is over haul the engine. Don't want to even think about that......

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I enjoyed reading all the replays but I thought the best is fit the tools to your skill level and as you learn more you will acquire more tools. Years ago I bought a roly-poly for small parts and that has been a great organizer. After 32 years though it has needed a couple of reorganizing sessions. Example is extra plug fuses for old campgrounds which now seem to be totally obsolete. It all has been totally fun all the way.

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One more thing you should carry or tow is a trailer with a million spare parts, bandages etc

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Credit cards, credit cards, credit cards. Gives you a record of what you bought and (most cards) a warranty.

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I wish to say thanks to all for the great ideas on what tools to carry.

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I wish to say thanks for all the great ideas .

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We just happen to be heading out in early Sept on our next chapter and Great Escape going full time. We sold our house about a year ago and downsized to an apartment with this in mind so I sold a lot of tools.

At this point not looking to do any major repairs myself, even though I have done so in the past. I liked all of the posts and great suggestions. I am starting with a socket set, hammers, screw drivers, cordless drill, of course, duct tape and black electrical tape, mostly in a canvas bag. I did get some safety triangles and will get some reflective vests (great suggestion). Extra fluids like DEF and perhaps fuel and air filters are a good idea.

We did join Good Sam, so have roadside assistance and a newer coach so hope to not have to do much more than minor fixes.

We are looking forward to our adventure as I am sure you are.

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