manholt

Pads For Jacks

29 posts in this topic

Per FMCA we where told to bring pads or 2"x8"x?" wood, to place under each jack, so the jack would not sink in and make holes. I used my air to level, because I have yet to find anything, including wood, that does not crumble or crack as soon as the weight of coach sits on it! Metal is too heavy. I tried a piece of
24"x24"x1/4" Lexan, that don't work either, and anything thicker is very expensive, especially x4.

Carl C.
AMC Tradition 45' 2010

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I don't think you'll need them if you are only air leveling. However, you don't know how out of level the grounds you will be parking on is and possible having to use your jacks.

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Carl,

You are right, any 2X anything will crack very easily.

Most crack resistant at reasonable price would be a sheet of 3/4" exterior plywood. Cut the sheet into appropriate size pieces. Glue and screw the pieces together orienting each layer at 90 degrees to the previous.

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I made 12" x 12"pads using 2" x 12" pine. I cut 5/8" OSB to size (11 1/4") and screwed to each side of the 2" x 12". These have worked for three years in mud, gravel, dirt and asphalt without breaking or cracking.

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I screwed together 2 12"x12" 3/4 ext plywood pieces with sheet rock screws. If I am on soft ground they bend slightly so the next time I use them I turn them over.

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Try Interstate Plastics. I got HDPE - High Density Polyethylene - that they cut to the size you want ( I got 12"x12"). You can get it up to 2 inches thick. I am using 3/4" that seems to be working well - $15 each but 1.5" is only $20 each. Go to Lowes or a Home Depot and get screen door handles to attach to the edge and you can use an awning hook to pull them out from under the coach.

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I made pads from pressure treated plywood, 5/8 thickness, cut into 12x12 squares (CDX Exterior Grade will work as well). I glued each piece together with liquid nail, then screwed them together with drywall screws. I used a router to cut two channels on the center piece about 4" inches long, separated by four inches to embed a piece of heavy nylon rope to be used as a handle. glued together 5 pieces. Painted same black. Does not bend or flex once cured. Does a great job. Cost of project less than $28.00. You will have enough material to make at least 5-6 units. Home Depot will cut them for you if you ask. (be persistent, some clerks may not want to do it- it is store policy to custom cut)

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All you have to do to use your awning hook is to drill a 1/2 inch hole near one of the corners. Thats what I did with mine and have been using them for 10 or so years.

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I use 2 x 12 boards cut to 20" long. I get them cut for me at Lowes. if one cracks no big deal, I just keep some extras at the house. Then I use an aluminum boat hook from the marine store, to place and pull them out.

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I used Rigid Lam from Home Depot cut to 14" squares. It must be ordered through the contractor's desk. The product was 1-3/4" thick by 14" wide. I had it cut to 14" square. Once I got it home I sealed the wood with several coats of colored sealer. The wood pads have been through floods and very dry conditions and they still work great. The cost of the material is $6.89 a foot. Again you must work with the contractor's desk at Home Depot.

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I'm back! I went with International Plastic, pads for RV's are pre-made to 12" x 12" x 3/4" with rope handles, cost $ 40 each and good for 2,500 psi. I got them in Austin, TX. on my way East. They work great! I tried one under each jack at the store! :wub:

Carl C.

10' AMC Tradition 45'

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On 9/13/2014 at 11:02 AM, lmsooter said:

Try Interstate Plastics. I got HDPE - High Density Polyethylene - that they cut to the size you want ( I got 12"x12"). You can get it up to 2 inches thick. I am using 3/4" that seems to be working well - $15 each but 1.5" is only $20 each. Go to Lowes or a Home Depot and get screen door handles to attach to the edge and you can use an awning hook to pull them out from under the coach.

Wow their prices really went up in 2 years, 12x12x3/4 is $29 now and 1.5 inch is $47. I was looking for something like this, wish the prices hadn't went up so much

 

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Always amazes me how folks grumble over a $50 item, for a $100,000+ toy! :lol::blink::wacko:

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I grumble because watching cost is how I can afford my toys.:P

These are some pads I made this spring. I had some that were just the 2X12 boards that were ok for hard surfaces but will split if used on dirt. These seem to be holding up well I used Gorilla wood glue to help hold them together along with the deck screws. 

Bill

JACK PADS.jpg

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Those look like my pads, Bill, except I used OSB because OSB is cheaper. What do you have to say about that Carl? Be careful, it was enough to buy me at least a quart of diesel. :D

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2 hours ago, Elkhartjim said:

Those look like my pads, Bill, except I used OSB because OSB is cheaper. What do you have to say about that Carl? Be careful, it was enough to buy me at least a quart of diesel. :D

I had the plywood as scrap after anouther project so it wasn't a added expense. I also saved money using my Kroger points and bought 35 gal diesel for $0.989 yesterday.:P That way I could afford the glue.:D

Bill

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I've been using my 2 X 10 treated wood pads for 10 years.  They have a covering of 5/8" plywood screwed to the 2 X 10.  The plywood helps in keeping the wood from cracking but will not keep it from cracking 100% but when they do crack, and one of mine has, the plywood keeps it intact.

Time to replace - getting old (wood that is)

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One of the problems with a single pad is that the weight is concentrated in the center under a fairly small metal pad of the jack.  Using a second pad above the larger main pad will help distribute the weight more evenly on the large pad and help prevent warping.  You don't have to use a second for every application but as mentioned by many, dirt or a soft surface presents the greatest challenge.  Using a secondary, slightly smaller pad on top of the main pad will help spread the weight around.

Our current coach has air leveling only.  While it does present challenges on sloping sites, I was more than happy to leave the jack pads behind.  :P

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Glad I made the comment. :P  It brought out some emotion for a change! :lol:

I got rid of my pads, back in Feb. when my second Jack hydraulic line burst and I had fluid everywhere including all over my toad.:angry:  I now am just using the Air side of the system and it works real nice! :)  I don't miss the Jacks and the weight of the pads was equal to 6 Blake boxes of wine! :o I rather carry the wine! :lol:

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I'm like CarlAda.  I use Lynx pads (or lego blocks as my grandkids call them).  My Lynx pads are hold-overs from my travel trailer days.   I typically only use them on the soft'ish  gravel LSU tailgating lot for RVs.

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I installed a set of snap pads and have used them on gravel for 1 month and at the Diesel rally this passed week on grass. So far they seem to work great and there is no placing and storage once installed.

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I still like our 12" by 18" with a thickness of 2 3/4 " white oak pads.  Heavy yes, but sturdy for sure. Of course not everyone has a saw mill a short distance away.

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