charlesholman@comcast.net

Turbo Failure on Caterpillar Engine

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Our C7 takes forever to get warm enough to want to move, even with pre heat on a half hour before. We start it and set the cruise control at about 1100 rpm.

Engine never gets warm until many miles down the road and climbing a hill. I've wondered i it had thermostats even.It has gotten to safe mode a few times n I40 near Flagstaff.

Had to clean the CAC and Radiator.

We have idled 15- 20 minutes, while finishing  dumping and storage and final walk arounds.

We've even run the engine and dash heat/ac to get condensation out of the coach.

Furnaces put moisture into the air. heat pumps don't work when cold, below about 45 degrees it seems. I've been looking off and on when I think about it or a dehumidifier to integrate int o the system have a stand alone but gets in the way.

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manholt   

Where are you at or how cold is it outside?   When I'm camped in Winter where it's cold (very seldom) I put the block heather on the night before I leave...ain't costing me nothing!

As for the length of time, have you checked or replaced your thermostats?

Normal for heat pump is 38+/-!

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43 minutes ago, timetraveler said:

Our C7 takes forever to get warm enough to want to move, even with pre heat on a half hour before. We start it and set the cruise control at about 1100 rpm.

Engine never gets warm until many miles down the road and climbing a hill. I've wondered i it had thermostats even.It has gotten to safe mode a few times n I40 near Flagstaff.

Had to clean the CAC and Radiator.

We have idled 15- 20 minutes, while finishing  dumping and storage and final walk arounds.

We've even run the engine and dash heat/ac to get condensation out of the coach.

Furnaces put moisture into the air. heat pumps don't work when cold, below about 45 degrees it seems. I've been looking off and on when I think about it or a dehumidifier to integrate int o the system have a stand alone but gets in the way.

Depending on how cold it is I would run the block heater from 2-4 hours before start or if riley cold overnight. I would replace the thermostats with the proper temperature ones.  By the way Cat calls them "regulators".

"Had to clean the CAC and Radiator" This should be a at least yearly maintence item.

The furnaces can't put moisture into the air if it is operating properly. The combustion chamber is separate from the air going into the coach. Cooking, showering and any open flame will add moisture.

No heat pumps don't put out heat below about 45 deg.

Bill

 

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jleamont   

Turbochargers fail for many reasons on newer engines.

  • Excessive idling
  • Oil passing (main reason for most and on older engines also)
  • coolant entering and passing through
  • VGT solenoid failure
  • Variable vanes sticking, usually caused by excessive idling or crud passing through like coolant. Usually caused by EGR cooler failure.

As mentioned a gauge to determine when the turbocharger is cool enough is a good tool to have so you know when its time to shut it down so you don't excessive idle the engine or shut it down to soon. The later model CAT's were notorious for turbocharger failures. I would reach out to CAT and ask for assistance.

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bjohn   

I recently had a turbo charger failure without any previous warning. It is a "new" 2007 Cummins engine in a new 2010 Damon Tuscany purchased as a new 2010. At first the diagnosis was the vgt actuator had failed and our Good Sam insurance was going to cover it. The next day however, Cummins sends a picture to the insurance people and I get a phone call from Cummins that MY bill is $7028.08 to replace the turbo charger. Cummins said there was rust. However, they also said that one of the freeze plugs had a pin hole in it and when they applied pressure to it, coolant leaked in. We are appealing the decision, that the primary failure was the defective freeze plug and the rust was a secondary issue.

What is this gauge that you mention that helps determine when its OK to stop the engine? Also did you get any assistance from CAT? Thanks.

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2 hours ago, bjohn said:

I recently had a turbo charger failure without any previous warning. It is a "new" 2007 Cummins engine in a new 2010 Damon Tuscany purchased as a new 2010. At first the diagnosis was the vgt actuator had failed and our Good Sam insurance was going to cover it. The next day however, Cummins sends a picture to the insurance people and I get a phone call from Cummins that MY bill is $7028.08 to replace the turbo charger. Cummins said there was rust. However, they also said that one of the freeze plugs had a pin hole in it and when they applied pressure to it, coolant leaked in. We are appealing the decision, that the primary failure was the defective freeze plug and the rust was a secondary issue.

What is this gauge that you mention that helps determine when its OK to stop the engine? Also did you get any assistance from CAT? Thanks.

The gage you are looking for is a Exhaust Gas Temperature Gage or EGT. The sensor is installed in the exhaust before the turbo. 

I won't drive a (diesel) coach with out one. They provide a wealth of information on how your engine is performing.

Bill

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manholt   

Mine is part of the Silverleaf System and the EGT came installed on this coach...also, a constant real time temp probe for #1 and 2 Exhausts!  :)

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