varnep

Double Coin Tires

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varnep   

Any comments concerning Double Coin 275/70R22.5 RT600 or 500 tire. Looking to replace the old Michelin XZA2's with a lower cost alternative.

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varnep,

Welcome to the FMCA Forum!

No real good Data regarding the Double Coin tires. They are made in China and have been marketed in the states sense 1992.

I have not seen any information regarding there product from the over the road trucking industry.

The only information I have regarding Double Coin from the NHTSA.

MONROVIA, Calif., January 6, 2015 — CMA and Double Coin Holdings, Ltd (DCHL), a leading tire manufacturer and marketer announces formal notification by the National Highway Transportation and Safety Administration (NHTSA) on December 30, 2014 that they agreed with CMA position that the stated noncompliance is inconsequential to motor vehicle safety. According to NHTSA, no additional obligation for providing a remedy or notification is required.

See more at: http://www.doublecointires.com/news/article/2015/84#sthash.klVuD8vN.dpuf

Rich.

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varnep,

It was once said here on the Forum by Brett Wolfe aka wolfe10 and I paraphrase "Do you want to put your Safety at risk to save a couple of bucks?"

Please take into consideration you and your loved ones safety.

Herman

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varnep   

Thank you both for your responses. The link to Double Coin's web site was informative. Had no idea they have been selling tires in the US since 1992. I will continue my research for a safe affordable tire and welcome any comments.

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There is several other tire manufacturers that are good choices, if saving a little over Michelin is a must. I have used Sumitomo, and Kumho, and Goodyear with success.

As stated earlier by Herman, don't put your life and the life of your loved ones at risk for a few bucks.

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I was offer Chinese tires at a cheap price at Camping World but I passed on them because of safety not price. I went with the Michelin program to save some as I always had the best performance out of them. Example is my Jeep would go through tires in 20 - 30 thousands miles then I got 80 thousand miles out of Michelin's. I'm very pleased with the Michelin's on my coach after 14 thousands miles as the Goodyear's had to be replaced at 29 thousands. The wear seem to be very minimal and I probably save over the Chinese tires in the long run.

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I have recently looked for Michelin 255/80R22.5 tires and all I could find was one here, one there, and the Michelin dealer that I could use the FMCA Advantage program could not tell when he might get some in. So, I decided to go the Toyo equivalent at $470 a tire. Much below the $600+ for Michelins that I found within 100 miles of here.

Shop around, there are some good, safe, tires for less money.

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Cookie   

varnep,

It was once said here on the Forum by Brett Wolfe aka wolfe10 and I paraphrase "Do you want to put your Safety at risk to save a couple of bucks?"

Please take into consideration you and your loved ones safety.

Herman

I guess the question is, by using Double Coin tires are you "putting your Safety at risk"? I am on my second coach with Double Coin. They have performed well, and I have no hesitation using them. If you do some research, you will see that there seems to be no greater danger of failure with them than with any other tire.

I guess it is the old adage; "you get what you pay for"!!

For many years I worked for a well known company which makes consumer products, and they are probably the highest priced in the market for what they make. Yes, they are good, but in some areas there are other products that are just as good at a much lower price, and there are times when we 'outsourced' the production of some of our products to others because we couldn't keep up with production, and the items were EXACTLY the same as the cheaper brand, but they had out name on them so we could charge more.

I will continue to use Double Coin until/unless I find a reason not to.

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jleamont   

A few years ago I worked for a small construction co as their shop manager, we rarely wore out a tire, most were destroyed on a job site, with that being said I always bought the cheapest tire I could find, at the time they were Westlakes from China. I never had a problem with them and we ran those on the entire fleet including the tractors moving equipment.

Now, ride quality was not a concern nor was it ever compared to any other tire manufacture and as we know one manufacture to another can provide better handling and ride comfort, usually is based on the tread design.

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tireman9   

No matter the brand you select I recommend that people be sure to research the warranty and to research the dealer network. If you have an issue and need to check with a dealer will you be able to find one?

Have you considered the value of selecting a brand tire that is carried by a dealer network of say 500 to 1,000 dealers across the US? or do you really feel comfortable buying from a single outlet location like "Billy-Jo-Bob Cheep tire Emporium and bait sttore"?

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Cookie   

The vast majority of my travels, maybe 90% at this time are in the Western US and I buy all my tires, car and MH at Les Schwab. As you may know they have 478 locations in eight Western states. I have been dealing with them for over 35 years and have been very pleased with them.

I do completely agree with the concept of dealing with someone who will be there when you need them. They were the 'go to guys' for tires for the company I worked for for 31 years, and they always came through in the pinch, especially when I needed help out on the road.

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varnep   

Any comments concerning Double Coin 275/70R22.5 RT600 or 500 tire. Looking to replace the old Michelin XZA2's with a lower cost alternative.

Thank you all for your comments and opinions. I ended up replacing the steering tires with Michelin's.

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tireman9   

I always like facts and numbers.

A bit more information. According to Modern Tire Dealer pg 37 there are four tiers of tire companies in the US market

"Tier 1 (major tire companies’ premium brands): Michelin, Bridgestone, Goodyear.

Tier 2 (upper- and middle-market brands): Continental, Pirelli, Hankook, Yokohama, Toyo, Falken, Kumho, Dunlop,
Cooper, Firestone, BFGoodrich, General.

Tier 3 (value brands; all private brands): Nexen, Hercules, Multi-Mile, GT Radial, Mastercraft, Sumitomo, Big O, Cordovan,
Delta, Fierce, Fuzion, Kelly, Nitto, Sigma, Landsail, Delinte, Kenda, Vredestein, Nokian, Sailun, Eldorado, Uniroyal.

Tier 4 (low-cost brands): Atturo, Linglong, Goodride, Dynatrac, Warrior, Duraturn, Aeolus, Zenna, Starfire, Primewell, Federal.

These levels do not mean that all Tier 2 are better than all Tier 3 but IMO the ranking can be useful as the level do line up with technical resources, manufacturing capability, number of sales outlets

Check chart 11 on pg 40 and you will see Bridgestone has the largest number of outlets.

Note the above is passenger & LT type tire info

Truck (RV) tire info starts on pg 46 and may be more applicable to Class-A owners.

RE quality. Would you think that a company making poor quality tires would have a large market share? Low price can only get you a new customer but truck companies buy based on price/durability/performance not just low cost.

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Cookie   

I always like facts and numbers.

A bit more information. According to Modern Tire Dealer pg 37 there are four tiers of tire companies in the US market

"Tier 1 (major tire companies’ premium brands): Michelin, Bridgestone, Goodyear.

Tier 2 (upper- and middle-market brands): Continental, Pirelli, Hankook, Yokohama, Toyo, Falken, Kumho, Dunlop,

Cooper, Firestone, BFGoodrich, General.

Tier 3 (value brands; all private brands): Nexen, Hercules, Multi-Mile, GT Radial, Mastercraft, Sumitomo, Big O, Cordovan,

Delta, Fierce, Fuzion, Kelly, Nitto, Sigma, Landsail, Delinte, Kenda, Vredestein, Nokian, Sailun, Eldorado, Uniroyal.

Tier 4 (low-cost brands): Atturo, Linglong, Goodride, Dynatrac, Warrior, Duraturn, Aeolus, Zenna, Starfire, Primewell, Federal.

These levels do not mean that all Tier 2 are better than all Tier 3 but IMO the ranking can be useful as the level do line up with technical resources, manufacturing capability, number of sales outlets

Check chart 11 on pg 40 and you will see Bridgestone has the largest number of outlets.

Note the above is passenger & LT type tire info

Truck (RV) tire info starts on pg 46 and may be more applicable to Class-A owners.

RE quality. Would you think that a company making poor quality tires would have a large market share? Low price can only get you a new customer but truck companies buy based on price/durability/performance not just low cost.

Very interesting. I went to the link you provided and noted the items used for ranking the tires in each tier.

"That is why Modern Tire Dealer believes four tiers are ultimately more accurate and helpful than three. In order to

develop four tiers of brands for the U.S. market, we asked the following questions:

1. How is the brand marketed? That includes both the

promotional aspect of marketing and the tires against which

a brand is marketed. For example, associate and private brand

tires generally compete against each other in the same tier.

2. What is the selling price of the tire?

3. What is the perceived quality? People often associate

greater expense with greater quality.

We also took the following into consideration: OE contracts; place on the manufacturer’s own product screen; size of the company; brand recognition; availability; market share (see Chart 8); ultra-high performance tire market share; global presence; domination of a niche market; and whether or not a manufacturer had at least a sales and marketing arm in the U.S."

So if you look at these criteria, you see that 'perception' 'size of the company' and 'price' have a lot to do with the ranking. Also such things as " OE (original equipment) contracts, "size of the company" ''ultra-high performance tire market share", and "domination of a niche market" were considered in the ranking. Of course a smaller, newer company that does not have a "niche market', or an "ultra-high performance tire" would not rank high. Also, the following comment was added, and I don't know why they put this thought into their rankings at all, but here it is: "We couldn’t list every brand in every tier, but as a general rule, inexpensively priced tires either from China or competing against them would be placed in Tier 4."

But the most important thing is that this ranking does not have anything to do with RV tires. In the RV section to which you referred, Double Coin had the 7th highest market share for replacement 'truck tires' in the U.S.

I have no connection at all with Double Coin other than the fact that I use them and am pleased. In fact, my father worked in management for Firestone (back when it was a U.S company) (including working directly with Mr. Firestone) from 1939 until his medical retirement in 1971. I am sure he turned over in his grave when it was sold to Bridgestone, a Japanese company.

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manholt   

I have survived for 72+ years, by putting SAFTY first and the expense second...I go with the expert and that is the Tireman! I have 8 Michelins, that I replaced in August of 2014, using FMCA Fleet Program! :wub:

Look at the coach I drive, then ask yourself. "would I and my family feel safe at 65mph on, I want to save a few bucks tires?" :huh:

You have a nice coach. :)

If Michelin made "Mudders", they would be on my Jeep...

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Been using them as my drive tires for 7000 miles now. I'm satisfied with their performance including wear and ride. I looked them up on the semi driver's forums and got all positive feedback on them. I'll be buying them again.

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Well  I for one would dispute the placement of Nokian in the bottom tier. It is not by any stretch a bargain tire as evidenced by it pricing! It is by far with one exception the ultimate winter tire! It's summer tires are also top tier in performance. It is however a very small company when compared to Michelin or Goodyear. It is considered a premium tire based upon price and by those of us that have been using their winter tires for the last decade. When on the ice or snow it has only one competitor and everybody else is a wants to be. The difference is noticeable from  the shore line.

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manholt   

On my Jeep Wrangler I'm on my second set of 35" Nittos and all 4x4 outlets and Forums I have checked out, list Nitto as the top 3 for on/off road. :P Not cheap, you get what you pay for, I don't like the thought of being at 12,000+ feet in the middle of the San Juan Mountains with more than one blown tire! :angry:

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