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Luxury motorhome resorts


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#1 ccmsm

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 07:10 AM

Although my motorhome is luxury to me, I realize that some people wouldn't consider my motorhome luxury to them. I feel just as good camping next to a popup as I would camping next to a high-end motorhome.

I see a lot of adds for luxury motorhome resorts. Do these resorts accept regular motorhomes like mine, or do they have to be high-end motorhomes. Our camping friends just bought a new fifth-wheel so, we probably won't be visiting many motorhome-only resorts, anyway. ccmsm
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Susan and Charles Mobley
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#2 Guest_Wayne77590_*

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 08:31 AM

Susan and Charles,

Someone else should be along with more information, but here is my take on it. Those "resorts" that take Class A only motorhomes will typically post those restrictions on their web site. You can search on the words: "motorhome only resort" and get several results.

I have not seen a campground that restricts usage to only high-end motorhomes, like Prevost. After all, how many high-end users are traveling near those "resorts" and wish to spend the night. Although there may be many, many high-end coaches, the possibility that a "resort" would have enough staying there to support their system would be far and few between. And who would make the list of the cutoff for allowing a coach to stay? Who would make the determination of what a "high-end" motorhome would be?

I, as you most likely are, am as proud of my motorhome as the next person. I hold no envy for what others have. I'm not sure I would frequent campgrounds that would only allow high-end motorhomes. , like you, have many acquaintances and friends that have fifth-wheels. I would not want to stay where they were not welcome also.

With that said, I have seen campgrounds that specifically state nothing over 10 years old. Even then, people have sent pictures and have received an exception. There are many vintage RVs that are as close to being in the same shape as when they were purchased new.

When in doubt, call and ask specific questions. The worse you can get for asking is a "No!"

One of my sayings is: "It doesn't matter what you camp in, you will be having just as much fun."

#3 ccmsm

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 08:59 AM

You made some very good points, Wayne. Thanks, ccmsm
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Susan and Charles Mobley
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#4 berginaperzina

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 09:37 AM

before I purchased my new RV, we stayed in a luxury motorhome park in Lebanon, OR. I wondered what they would say about my older RV when the first thing I saw was two 40-foot Marathons all decked out and towing full-size Hummers.

When we went in to get a spot they had an employee come out and walk around our RV before they checked us out. We passed and got a nice spot more toward the back. I asked the person what the criteria was and they said no paint falling off and generally it should not look like the motorhome was falling apart.

That was actually one of the funnest places we have stayed -- golf course, great steak restaurant, paper at your door in the morning and very friendly campers to talk to.
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#5 GreenBeaver

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 10:08 PM

Susan and Charles,

Someone else should be along with more information, but here is my take on it. Those "resorts" that take Class A only motorhomes will typically post those restrictions on their web site. You can search on the words: "motorhome only resort" and get several results.

I have not seen a campground that restricts usage to only high-end motorhomes, like Prevost. After all, how many high-end users are traveling near those "resorts" and wish to spend the night. Although there may be many, many high-end coaches, the possibility that a "resort" would have enough staying there to support their system would be far and few between. And who would make the list of the cutoff for allowing a coach to stay? Who would make the determination of what a "high-end" motorhome would be?

I, as you most likely are, am as proud of my motorhome as the next person. I hold no envy for what others have. I'm not sure I would frequent campgrounds that would only allow high-end motorhomes. , like you, have many acquaintances and friends that have fifth-wheels. I would not want to stay where they were not welcome also.

With that said, I have seen campgrounds that specifically state nothing over 10 years old. Even then, people have sent pictures and have received an exception. There are many vintage RVs that are as close to being in the same shape as when they were purchased new.

When in doubt, call and ask specific questions. The worse you can get for asking is a "No!"

One of my sayings is: "It doesn't matter what you camp in, you will be having just as much fun."


Isn't it great that that sort of thing isn't done at Cherry Point or Ft. Huachuca or Holloman AFB??? And the price is a lot better.
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#6 da141

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Posted 01 November 2009 - 10:02 AM

Read with interest Richard McKee's (F159358) letter to editor in the November 2009 FMCA mag about being "denied" entry to an RV park it has happened to me as well. I own a 1994 Wanderlodge in near showroom condition. Was told "we restrict motorhomes over 10 years of age". Seems in times of economic crisis park owners/managers should not be so "snootie".

Tommy Rountree
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#7 mftampa

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 10:14 AM

My experience is, it depends on the resort. Some are class A only, some allow class A and class C, some have age restrictions on the coach, some don't. I have a lot at Riverbend Motorcoach Resort near Ft Myers in Florida and a lot at ORA Pacific Shores in Newport, Oregon and you would be welcomed at both but neither accept 5th wheels. However, some of the Outdoor Resorts sites DO accept 5th wheels. This information is not always on the web site. If you find somewhere you like and they don't specifically say they exclude 5th wheels, I would still call ahead and check.

Mick
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#8 ms911

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 01:58 PM

Outdoor Resorts do not accept 5th wheels. Class A and sometimes Class C
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#9 TBUTLER

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Posted 03 November 2009 - 07:03 PM

Read with interest Richard McKee's (F159358) letter to editor in the November 2009 FMCA mag about being "denied" entry to an RV park it has happened to me as well. I own a 1994 Wanderlodge in near showroom condition. Was told "we restrict motorhomes over 10 years of age". Seems in times of economic crisis park owners/managers should not be so "snootie".

Tommy Rountree
F31522
Alabama


The owners of "snootie" parks are well compensated by those who stay in their park to be as snootie as they are. When fewer people are inclined to separate themselves from the rest of the rabble, they will change their ways. In the meantime, do you really want such snootie people for neighbors? I'd rather live among people who are more interested in who you are than how much money you have and what you own.

Many parks have rules about the condition of the living units (trailers, motor homes, mobile homes) that do not specify the age as a criteria. This allows them to remove the derelict units which do eventually make a camp look unacceptably humble. For those who can't comply there are many campgrounds without such restrictions. We just spent a month in a campground that I noticed has gone downhill pretty fast in the last two years. I suspect this is a result of the current economic conditions. There is a balance to be struck, trying to keep the property campground owners own from becoming so shoddy that they can't recover their investment and becoming so exclusive that no one can afford to stay at their facilities.

In the park where we stay now, there is a very old motor home. I was startled last year to hear the diesel engine running! It turns out he park had instituted a requirement that all vehicles be licensed so they had to get the motor home started and take it out for inspection which it then passed. They spent several thousand dollars to get it up and running and inspected again so they get to stay. Another unit was hauled out because the owners couldn't or wouldn't comply with the rules. So I guess I'm living in a "snootie" park at least to some degree. :rolleyes:
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#10 fredrump

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 11:19 AM

So called luxury motor home resorts in many cases are owned by the residents. They have deeded site restrictions and by-laws to contend with. Some folks are not there all the time and place their lots out for rental but the rules stay the same. At Pelican Lake in Naples an owner brought a $600,000 class C coach onto his lot and a law suit was instigated by the board to have him remove this non-compliant coach. The question turned into the exact definition of what is a class A coach and he lost in court. The park is restricted to bus style Class A coaches and that is that.

As a former owner there I can say that the economy has pulled in some of the past snobbishness and folks are getting along again but there was a time when not having a Prevost definately put you into a lower class resident category. Clicks started forming and the general athmosphere became unfriendly. The condo-commandos had taken over and we left in 2004 afer being there for 6 years. Lots are still being offered near to 1/2 million dollars as they are at Blue Water in the Keys but there have also been lots of fire sales in the low 6 figure category. Many high flyers are no longer flying as they used to. Still, there will never be a Class C RV in that park. Basically it's against the law.
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#11 tjjmiller

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Posted 04 November 2009 - 05:35 PM

Not all resort parks are the same, and sterotyping is still wrong, in my opinion. My babe, two pups, & I have RVed 25 yrs, always a Class A. We have full-timed now five years. We own a lot in a resort, but that is our only property. Some might say we're homeless, we claim to be houseless and thankful. We purchased our lot so we'll always have a place of our own, kind of like a summer cabin.

Since it was our decision to buy into a sort of mobile condiminium, we knew what we buying into. Some owners rent their lots when they're not using then; some own lots just for the "investment" potential. As in a condo development, we signed on we knew what was required/approved/accepted going in. Owners associations start out being controled by developers, and developers make the conditions, covenants and requirements. Owners associations struggle for years after they take over their development to remove some of the more rigid stipulations. I have acquaintances who RV in 5th-wheels, trailers, even from small pop-ups pulled by trikes or motorcycles. They all seem okay with it. If not, there is nothing I can do about it, as there is really nothing about it as you are a guest if/when you/I visit the luxury resorts.

Remember, we're all RVers. A good thing, right?
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#12 garykd

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Posted 16 November 2009 - 06:14 PM

Hi,
I agree with tjjmiller. Stereotyping and name calling/labeling is wrong. There is something for everyone when RVing. To disparage against RVers just because they RV differently than you says more about you than it does them. I have had only class A coaches. After 31 years of RVing with them my RVing style has evolved and regressed with the needs of that time in my life. When we had kids we toured the USA over 10 years. We stayed in CGs that had the facilities we needed. Because we were touring that usually meant full hookups. Nobody cared about any other amenities. We were touring the area. Without the kids we looked for more of a community environment. We stayed longer in CGs and used the amenities of the CG. We did not give up touring the area, but gathering at the club house and socializing with other guests became more important. Now, with the Gkids, we are back to square one again touring the USA, over 10 years. Our kids told us what a value it was for them so we decided to provide this adventure to the Gkids. Once this commitment is completed we will return to looking for places to stay longer with a community environment. Because of our age, mobility and I am no longer a fan of driving we will look for condo type resorts that have the community we fit into. The goal is to follow the sun, but stay where the temperatures are pleasant. This may mean purchasing a site in one or more resorts. I have lived in South Florida for many years (decades). Almost all the developments are PUDs (Planned Unit Developments). We are used to the covenants and appreciate them. It is comforting to know what the rules are when one makes a purchase. This allows buyers to have a level of confidence what they see is what they will get, over a long period of time. If my purchase is where no RVs over 10 years are allowed, so be it. I see nothing wrong with this or any other covenant/restriction as long as the enforcement is consistent over time and legal.

For those renting or visiting a resort for the first time, it may be best if one makes a list of questions to ask when making a reservation. I have a list and it keeps my disappointment to a minimum. It also allows me to make a decision as to pursue the reservation or go somewhere else.
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#13 ChunkyBeastracin

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 08:49 AM

A few RV purchase ago we had our first RV which was a 97 Coachmen Mirada Class A 30'. We went to a 5 Star RV resort in Breckenridge Colorado called the tiger run. When we pulled in we did feel out of place as we were surrounded by 45' foot Prevosts with Double Decker matching trailers etc. While some of the people were snoots there was equally nice people there and we enjoyed our selves. I guess you need to care less about what people think and care more about having fun and focusing on the good people you meet.
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