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richard5933

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Everything posted by richard5933

  1. richard5933

    New to FMCA

    Welcome from SE Wisconsin! Glad to have you join the fun. Nice looking coach!
  2. richard5933

    Debris Damage to Toads

    There was an accident in SE Wisconsin in 1994 which killed five of a family's children when their van hit some metal road debris. Ever since then, I've noticed debris as I pass it on the road. Once I had cell phone I have it a habit now to call 911 to report road debris if it's possible to hopefully avoid another tragedy. You were lucky that the only damage was to your rear flap. It really emphasizes how important it is to do a full walk-around inspection at every stop.
  3. richard5933

    GFCI Outlet No Power

    In the very first post it when the original problem was mentioned, it was noted that there was no power to the fridge. Is the fridge on this coach being powered by the inverter? If so, and if the inverter was turned on while the battery dropped from 14v+ down to 12.25v, that would be the answer.
  4. richard5933

    GFCI Outlet No Power

    With these voltage readings it's pretty clear that you are charging the batteries while plugged into shore power. That's why your voltage goes up when plugged in. The problem is that after only 30 minutes your voltage is down to 12.24 volts, which is quite low for only 30 minutes. There are only two possible reasons that your batteries will drop down to 12.24 after such a short period of time. Either there is something drawing power from the batteries or the batteries are not taking a charge. If there is something drawing down your batteries, you've got to start searching to see what it is. Somewhere in your coach you have something using battery power, and until you find it this and fix it this will keep happening. If you have absolutely nothing drawing current from your batteries, then the only other problem is the batteries themselves. A sure-fire way to determine which of these is the problem would be to let the charger run at 14.38v (or whatever it's charging at) for a full day. Then disconnect the GROUND wire(s) from your batteries. Take pictures first so you can put them back the same way. Measure the voltage about an hour after disconnecting the ground cable. Measure it again a day later. It should be nearly the same. If the ground cable is disconnected and there is no voltage drop, then the problem is something drawing from the batteries when they are connected. If the voltage drops even with the ground cable disconnected, then the problem is the batteries themselves.
  5. richard5933

    Efficient Navigation

    I've got two Garmin units - one is an older nuvi 3590 LMT in the car and the other is the RV 760 LMT. The 760 is the one I'm talking about, and it's not a hybrid. Don't even know what a hybrid GPS unit is. They both have the same traffic receiver and both handle traffic the same way. The traffic re-routing feature can be easily turned on/off, and it's really great if you are getting near a city which you are unfamiliar with as it will take you around the traffic areas so you don't inadvertently end up being stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic or get stuck on a route which is closed for construction. Traffic and road construction are not features of the regular maps - they are features of the traffic receiver. Both of my Garmins are LMT units. I believe that it's possible to buy a stripped-down version without the traffic features, and if you're not using the power cord with the traffic receiver you also won't have traffic routing. The name of the unit, RV 760 LMT says it all ... The LM is for lifetime maps, and the T is for traffic. Don't know what settings you and your user friends have, but mine does have settings where a user can elect to have the Garmin route around traffic. That's the whole purpose of the traffic receiver which is built into the power cord. The traffic receiver is the black rectangular part about 6" from the small end of the cord. If you do have the LMT version of the Garmin and don't have the traffic routing options, then perhaps it's time to run an update? I update both of my units at least every couple of months to get the latest maps and software updates. Garmin has software called Garmin Express which you use on a PC to update the units.
  6. richard5933

    Fuel stops at the flying J. Any discounts on fuel

    Not really. The way to get the discount at Flying J/Pilot was mentioned long ago...get a Good Sam membership or a corporate account.
  7. richard5933

    Fuel stops at the flying J. Any discounts on fuel

    I joined FMCA to be part of the community that is FMCA. I joined Good Sam, Passport America, and one other that I can't remember right now to get discounts.
  8. Contact the state insurance commission and see what rights you have. They vary from state to state. As the injured party I would think that they have to talk to you. I'd also contact an attorney. One well written letter to both the shop and the insurance company might get things moving.
  9. richard5933

    Efficient Navigation

    If your Garmin has a traffic receiver, which it sounds like it does, then yes - it will attempt to re-route around traffic and/or roads closed due to traffic. That is, if the traffic receiver is getting a good traffic signal. These traffic signals are transmitted totally separately from the satellite GPS signal, and reception is not always good. If your Garmin is giving you traffic notifications, then you can assume it would re-route around the traffic. All that said, there are settings where you can tell the Garmin whether or not you want it to avoid traffic. I have mine set to avoid traffic, and at times if the Garmin senses a problem ahead it will re-route mid trip. Usually it offers a couple of alternatives if this happens at the beginning of the route. If it happens mid-trip, a warning will pop up and tell me that there is another route that will save xx number of minutes. I'd then have to positively select the new route. Now, if along the route the Garmin determines that the road ahead is closed, it will re-route in real time and will not ask. It does this using the best information available to it, which is not always current. For example, there is a stretch of road around here that is closed at night sometimes for construction, usually from something like 10pm - 5am. However, when I leave for my morning commute at about 5:30am, sometimes it still thinks the road is closed and will try and route me around it. I wasn't paying attention the first time it did this, and I ended up being diverted to a parallel surface road and spent about 30 minutes extra getting into town that day. The GPS units are good. They won't knowingly lead you astray. But they do need to have an intelligent mind double check them at times, which is why I will confirm traffic conditions before leaving if possible. I've yet to encounter the Garmin leading me down a road with a height/weight restriction where I shouldn't be, but I do keep my eyes open to signs and such just to be sure. I'm not going to put my life in the hands of a little electronic box alone.
  10. richard5933

    Efficient Navigation

    Unfortunately, sometimes there are not lots of good options other than find the route with the least traffic and carry on. There is no easy way to get around Chicago if one wants to go from SE Wisconsin to points east. It's either go through Chicagoland or across the lake. The other option is to add a few hours to the trip and detour west, but that can add up to quite a bit and really lengthen the trip. That's why at times it's important to have an accurate traffic picture. I also enjoy the scenic route, but sometimes it's the priority is to get where you are going and not an extra two to three hours sitting in traffic. We are not retired yet, so we have to fit our travels into the given vacation times. That means that half a day can be important in being able to enjoy our destination or not.
  11. richard5933

    Efficient Navigation

    Not sure my point was clear about the Garmin routing... The original question was about the most direct routing and how to help with that. My point was that the Garmin includes traffic in its calculations. When the route appears as not being direct, it might be because it's routing you around traffic. However, it relies on receiving a separate signal through a traffic receiver to get the real-time traffic updates. The traffic receiver is the small rectangular box which is incorporated partway down the power cord to the head unit. You've got to use the window/dash mount to have this work - if you're using a standard USB cable to power the unit you won't get a traffic signal and traffic won't be used in setting the route. What I was posting about is sometimes the Garmin will route you through an area that you know to be heavily trafficked. One example is when it sets a route for me through downtown Chicago on I-94. I know that there will be traffic, always is. However, sometimes when I'm at home and set the route the Garmin's traffic receiver isn't getting a good traffic signal. So, it sets the route without the traffic signal, therefore sending me into horrible traffic. That's why I suggested confirming traffic conditions for situations like this by using Google Maps and/or Waze. Other than the traffic situation, I'd agree that Garmin will route you as requested and will include your height/weight restrictions.
  12. richard5933

    Efficient Navigation

    I've also found that the traffic receiver on the Garmin depends on reception for accuracy. If it presents a route that seems like it would put you through a congested area, plug the route into Google Maps or Waze and see what the real-time traffic situation is. If there are portions of the Garmin route that have traffic you want to avoid, it's possible to have Garmin detour around them. By having Garmin do the detour, it will consider your height/weight as it re-routes.
  13. Not sure why a company wouldn't sell you a seat with a 3-point harness built in. Whether it's a seat with a 2-point or a seat with a 3-point, they both will bolt to the floor & chassis the same way. The difference between the two is that the seat with the integral 3-point harness has an frame built to withstand the forces being applied forward at the top of the seat back. The seat with the 3-point should have an interior frame that connects all the parts from top to the bottom mounting plate securely, and assuming that the floor and substructure in your motor home is solid and secure all should be good. There are a number of places that sell aftermarket seats like the Flexsteel. Perhaps a phone call to some place like Brad & Hall in Elkhart would be helpful. They do installs there, so they should certainly be able to give you a definitive answer about this project.
  14. richard5933

    Heating Class A Coach While Driving

    I'm guess that it has more to do with the possibility of an open flame existing in an RV or motor home with the LP turned on. The CNG powered vehicles are not supposed to have an open flame, and they come from the factory with appropriate safety measures in place. Since there is no way for them to know what's connected and being used in an RV (like a pilot or furnace flame, or maybe even a cooktop) best to just turn them all off.
  15. richard5933

    Heating Class A Coach While Driving

    If you have a 12v circuit for the furnace, it should run just fine without running the generator. Not sure if you can run the water heater without the generator. Of course, if you have an AquaHot or similar system then you should be able to get both heat and hot water on 12v.
  16. richard5933

    Heating Class A Coach While Driving

    Also, if it's the first time to run the furnace for the season, use a flashlight to check for nests in the exhaust opening before firing it up. Never know what you're gonna find...
  17. richard5933

    GFCI Outlet No Power

    If batteries tested good and they still lose charge, then something has to be drawing from them. There is a phantom load somewhere, and the first place I'd look is to see if the Inverter/Charger is being properly turned off when not either in use or plugged and charging. If that's not it, then something else is drawing power. The batteries may be good today, but park somewhere for a few days and run them down to nothing a few times and they'll be needing replacement again.
  18. richard5933

    GFCI Outlet No Power

    Does the inverter go into sleep mode when there is no 120v load on it?
  19. richard5933

    Dashboard Vent Air VERY warm

    That's a great solution. Thanks for letting us know how it turned out. I'm glad that you were able to keep the control point inside so you don't have to crawl around in the hood to turn the heat on/off. This is a common solution used on lots of step vans and other medium trucks - wonderful that it worked for you as well.
  20. richard5933

    GFCI Outlet No Power

    Sounds like you're heading in the right direction. I'd suggest you keep monitoring and see how long it takes for the voltage to drop to 13.2 (or there about).
  21. richard5933

    washer dryer detergent

    If it's front loading, then most any detergent with the HE symbol on the front should be fine. The HE symbol is for 'high efficiency' and will clean your clothes but produces far fewer (if any) suds. Doesn't look like it's doing anything if you are used to seeing lots of suds, but it is. Like Ross & Melanie said, you'll use far less in a front loader than you're used to if you're coming from a top loader.
  22. richard5933

    Any tips for traveling route 66 from Iowa?

    We driven it a few times between Chicago and St. Louis. There are sections with some of the original road-side attractions, cafes, etc. Other sections have been taken over by the Interstate, and other sections are no longer in good enough condition to actually drive on. Check out sites like this to see if you can find a section you want to travel: https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/route66/maps66.html Depending on which part of Route 66 you want to visit, there are some that are still well maintained and great for travel. Best to do a little research though.
  23. richard5933

    GFCI Outlet No Power

    The only thing that I see which may or may not be of concern is the voltage at the house batteries while you're plugged in (shore or generator). That looks like it is charging at the bulk level (or whatever your charger calls the higher charge level), which is fine for a while but not where I'd want the voltage to long term. My charger runs at 14.4v until the batteries are fully charged, then it drops a little for a short while and then finally settles in at 13.2v for a float charge. It stays at the 13.2v float charge all the time if nothing is drawing from the batteries, and once a day it goes to 14.6v for about 15 minutes to keep the batteries from having problems. Dropping to somewhere around 13.2v is important, because continuing to charge at a higher voltage causes more out-gassing and more water evaporation. My suggestion would be to continue taking voltage readings for a few days after the batteries are fully charged and see what happens. If you just replaced the inverter/charger, I'm sure that there are settings which would allow you to set up the charging pattern that is best for your particular battery situation. If you are unsure of the proper charging voltages for your batteries, go to the manufacturer's website and find the data sheet. They should list the various charge voltages they recommend.
  24. richard5933

    Kohler 12.5 RCOP67 Generator Problem

    It was time for the monthly generator run so I went out to the coach and got the old Kohler up and running. Took a few tries but it did start and come to life. I probably didn't hold the preheat button long enough to start the first time. The old Perkins is a bit tired, but the oil pressure came up in a very short time and the engine evened out at a smooth idle. Not bad considering it's in the 20s today and the Perkins has no block heater. I turned on the electric heaters in the coach to put on a load, about 5,000 watts total, and things seemed okay. However, after about 10 minutes the engine just shut off for no apparent reason. Oil pressure seemed okay, and temp was still climbing and was just above 140F. I tried to restart but the engine just turned with not even the slightest hint of starting. I went to the generator bay to try it there so I could listen to what happened. When I turned the switch to 'run', the usual loud click of the fuel solenoid was absent. Then I noticed that the "cranking reset" red button had tripped and was sticking out. I was able to push it back in till it clicked. After that the engine started but only ran for about 30 seconds before shutting down again. I repeated this a couple of more times with the same result. There was no sign of catastrophic failure - no oil leaking, no antifreeze leaking, and all fluids looked okay. After about 15 minutes of letting things rest, I tried again. The engine started and ran fine. It stayed running this time. I let it run for a few minutes from the generator bay, and then shut down to check again for obvious problems. Things seemed okay so I tried again from the main panel inside. Again the engine started and ran fine. Oil pressure was steady about about 45 psi. Temp was slowing rising then suddenly climbed to 170. It was starting to go higher, and just as I was reaching for the shut-down switch it dropped back to a little over 140 and started to climb slowly again. I ran it for about half an hour total while I watched the gauges. Enough to check off the 'run generator' item off my monthly checklist. Now I have to add 'diagnose generator' to the list. Here's my thoughts: Seems like something triggered an automatic shut down. I'm not totally sure how the shut down circuit works in the Kohler control box, but the fact that the 'cranking reset' button popped out points me towards this. Add to that the fact that upon initial reset it ran for about 20 seconds and shut down again, and I'm pretty sure that some type of auto shut down circuit is in play here. The temperature gauge climbing suddenly to just over 170 and the dropping back to 140 leads me to think that I've got a sticking thermostat. Possibly this caused the shut down, but I'm not sure. I didn't see the gauge at the moment of shut down. When I checked the engine after the initial shut down, the lower radiator hose was warm but the tank and upper hose was cold. This adds to my theory that a sticking thermostat was in play here. I've checked the manuals I have for the generator that I downloaded from the Wanderlodge site, but none of them mention the red 'cranking reset' button, so I really have no idea where that plays in the system or if it's in the auto-shutdown circuit. I would love to hear what others think could be at play here. Maybe someone has more familiarity with the auto shut down on the old Kohlers that can add some wisdom here.
  25. richard5933

    Kohler 12.5 RCOP67 Generator Problem

    You could be correct, but the gauge has been at that point over the summer during normal operation - hovering between 170 and 175 - for hours without a problem. Never saw the gauge go over that this time. But, the temp gauge might not have been reading actual temp. It's sticking into the water to read temp, and if there was an air pocket or other weirdness from a stuck thermostat it might have been getting a false reading. The temp gauge uses a separate sending unit from the one in the shut-down circuit, so it's possible for one to read normal and the other to read overheat. When I saw the gauge suddenly climb and then go back down, I'm guessing that's when the thermostat finally opened. I hope no damage was done, but no real way to tell just yet. Once things got going again the engine appeared to run okay, and there is no noticeable water in the oil or oil in the water. Fortunately, if overheat was the problem, the shut down system does work. Hopefully not five months till I can investigate - last year I was able to get a little work done during the winter with a few days here and there with temps above 40 degrees, and by early March we start having enough sun during the day to warm things just a tad and get a at least a couple of days a week where I can work outside on the coach.
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