Jump to content
jbrunson

Lug Nut Torque

Recommended Posts

I am searching for a economical method to torque my lug nuts to 475 ft. lbs.. i have one of the Chinese torque multipliers and it removes the nuts with the greatest of ease... is my solution as simple as torquing with this device?  If so, how do I determine what value to torque to with this device in-line?  90 revolutions on the handle are required for one revolution of the nut.  What is everyone else doing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While you could buy a torque multiplier, you could also get a 3/4" breaker bar, socket and 5' pipe.

Divide your weight into 475 to determine how far out the pipe from center of breaker bar you would need to just apply your weight (no muscle).

Example 175 pounds into 475 ft-lbs times 12 inches/foot = 32.6".

OR if you want to just apply 100 pounds, do it 4.75' out the pipe.

There is another method I use with a pipe extension and good quality 1/2" torque wrench.  If you have one, let me know and I can get you details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 3/4" torque wrench from my trucking days. Expensive but it was a business write off. Now it serves me well as the owner of an old class A. Maybe eBay for a used one or good buy on new?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

475 foot pounds sounds like a lot. :o  I'm not sure I could stand on the torque wrench and get that many foot pounds. I don't even think I could lift the cheater bar it would take. :wacko:

That is the reason I go to my friendly tire shop. They have the tools and man power to do the job.:P

Herman

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, hermanmullins said:

That is the reason I go to my friendly tire shop. They have the tools and man power to do the job.:P

Herman

 

My concern is that most tire service providers have no idea how much torque they are putting on lugnuts. I have asked on several occasions various providers how they calibrate their lug nut pneumatic guns. One replied " no calibration" necessary".   Another indicated "he could tell the torque by how it felt". Another yet indicated " when his compressor was at 120 lbs, his 1" gun had a 500 lbs capacity".    I guess you get the picture, these guys do not know how much torque they are applying. When I had a MH that had 19.5" rims, after tire purchase the rims were over torqued, which later could not removed with out extreme measures and possible damage to hub and rim.

But I agree with Herman, I take my MH to the "professionals" , especially since I no longer have Superman on my chest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the very reason why I don't let people under the hood of anything at home unless I'm standing right there.

My impact has 120 pounds per square inch in the house however that doesn't mean that my impact gun is putting out a hundred twenty pounds. At its lowest setting that joker is putting out 250.  

So I like to hand tighten and then tighten with any means other than my impact gun to it I think I'm pretty close to torque specifications and then I use a torque wrench

These clowns out here today will tear your rims to pieces if you don't watch them and it's not just a motorhome it's in regular cars too. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so I purchased one of these last year and it removes the nuts beautifully:

https://www.amazon.com/Torque-Multiplier-Wrench-Saving-Remover/dp/B00U4O9SAK/ref=sr_1_5?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1476986618&sr=1-5&keywords=Tool+Torque+Multiplier+Socket+Wrench+Set+with+Case%2C

 

I also have your typical click style 1/2" drive torque wrench

 

the specs indicate the following " Trans-speed ratio: 1:58 "  Is this properly interpreted 1 ft-lb input = 58 ft-lb out???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I had my new Michelin tiers installed it was at a truck place and I caught the guy installing the rims on my CR-V like it was a truck with the big impact wrench. I told him to take them all lose and torque to the 80 foot pounds specced my Honda. Some places just don't know.

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, jbrunson said:

so I purchased one of these last year and it removes the nuts beautifully:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B015PFORAS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I also have your typical click style 1/2" drive torque wrench

 

the specs indicate the following " Trans-speed ratio: 1:58 "  Is this properly interpreted 1 ft-lb input = 58 ft-lb out???

That is good for removal but most say not to use them to torque lug nuts.

I want the ability to do my own removal and installation just because.:P 

The main reason is I don't want to take it to someone if I need to do maintenance items that require the removal of a wheel. brakes seals etc.

Bill 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill, that's only because your coach is a light weight. :D  I would love to see you manhandle mine on/off...:blink::rolleyes:

One thing I have learned, in all things "man has got to know his limitations"! :P

Carl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, manholt said:

Bill, that's only because your coach is a light weight. :D  I would love to see you manhandle mine on/off...:blink::rolleyes:

One thing I have learned, in all things "man has got to know his limitations"! :P

Carl

Yes that day is coming.:P But till then.

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the equipment to change the wheel on my Jeep...what would you need for a 22.5 coach tire?  Or is that's why there are trailers behind a coach?  You can't use the HWH jacks, unless you have a death wish! :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carl, I carry a 20 ton air bottle jack with an adjustable pin on the top (cork screw type, it can also be pumped by hand), 33mm deep socket (3/4" drive) extensions, sledge hammer, 3/4" ratchet with different length handles (yea, the head separates from the handle) and a 3/4" torque wrench, I keep blocks of wood just in case the extension on a rear wheel needs some shoring up. The air bottle jack plugs into the air supply on the coach, so I can use the coach to lift itself.

But I do not carry a spare tire :lol: yet......and the only reason, my coach has two different size tires on it, once I get over that hurdle I will have a mounted spare. I do have Coach-Net as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where, pray tell are you going to mount a spare?  Your a mechanic, all that "Stuff"  will cover my coach net until I'm well past 90! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Throw out a grill?  How can you?  I figured you would add a Cajun cooker and a 15 gallon pot for "Deep Fryed" Turkey, Pork, Chicken, Duck, Goose, Gator or Possum! :lol::wacko:

Carl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try pulling 800# torque with a 3/4 pull handle with a ten foot pipe extension, I broke the Snapon pull handle once that way. Should have seen the face of the Snap rep that day! Of course I was pileing on all 240 that day:P.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, kaypsmith said:

Try pulling 800# torque with a 3/4 pull handle with a ten foot pipe extension, I broke the Snapon pull handle once that way. Should have seen the face of the Snap rep that day! Of course I was pileing on all 240 that day:P.

Every time I see a vehicle with Stud Pilot wheels I think of you Kay:lol:. You need a shop air compressor mounted in that coach to even think about pulling those wheels on the road. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meritor drive axle Stud nut torque 5/8-18 Torque is 185 to 200 Ft. Lbs. or 250 to 270 N-M for a Grade 8, according to my shop manual for Meritor RS-15-120 Axle unit.

The front stud nut torque is the same.

The axle is rated at 23000 Lbs. and there are axles rated for higher loads and the stud nuts will be larger so the torque rang will be higher.

Bolt / stud size and max torque for grade 8 studs

5/8 in. 18 thread= 200 Ft. Lbs.

3/4in. 10 thread= 320 Ft. Lbs.        3/4in. 16 thread= 357 Ft. Lbs.

7/8in. 9 thread= 515 Ft. Lbs.          7/8in.  14 thread= 568 Ft. Lbs.

Rich.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I checked with a number of tire shops and except for one, none had any way to torque the lug nuts properly. One had a 500 ft pound torque wrench in a very dusty box on a shelf about 8 feet off the floor. They had it but didn't use it.

I bought a 3 to 1 torque multiplier and a 250 ft pound torque wrench. 158 input put 475 on the lug nuts.

I thought it would be cheaper than a SnapOn 500 ft pound torque wrench ($350 back when I checked) but by the time I bought a 33 mm 1 inch drive socket ($35) and a ten inch long 1 inch extension ($75) and a 1/2 to 3/4 inch adapter (for the input) plus an 14 inch steel tube to go from the torque multiplier reaction bar to the ground  plus the cost of the multiplier and the torque wrench, I think the torque wrench cost would have been less expensive than the multiplier set up.

I used it once when I bought new tires or rather the tire shop used it.

Sold the motor home and still have the multiplier set up. Guess I ought to put it on Craig's list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On my new to me coach the inside rear dual was out of air. Took the MH slooowly to the local Michelin truck tire place a few miles away. While he took the lug nuts off he felt that they weren't as tight as they should be. After checking the tire and finding the valve stem extender at fault I had him install all new ones and check all wheels for correct torque. I have never seen an impact gun that big and the mechanic explained to me that the extension he put on it prevented going above the 475 ft lb. 

I love doing things myself but you just gotta know when to let the pros do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like he used a torque stick. You should have that checked with a torque wrench. I had a set of them and I scraped them, they were traditionally over or under when you double checked with a torque wrench and not just a little. The problem with those is air pressure, tool maintenance and the mechanics strength and the age and the amount of use that has on it all plays in the final torque achieved. those are calibrated on a fixture, not accounting for a human arm flex. 

One thing not mentioned is a wheel retorque, we do them at 100 and 500 miles after a wheel was pulled, you'd be surprised how often we were glad we did that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...