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MWeiner

Do You Wash Your Own Motorhome-- Where?

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I carry a small pump garden sprayer in a bay just to rinse when I use the bucket sponge method at those parks that will not allow washing of the coach, just for those times that Tom mentioned cleaning those fresh bugs. I agree that the sooner, the better for cleaning them. Also a spot cleaning at a rest area the sprayer comes in handy.

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When I fill up at a truck stop I will break out my Windex. I will spray the entire windshield Start the pump and go back and spray again. then I will use the long handle scrubber and squeegee. Using this method the Windex loosens the bugs and makes it so much easier to clean.

Just my 2 cents.

Herman  

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Herman, you may want to consider this also. I use RejeX on the front of my motorhome including the windshield. It makes bug removal much easier especially during love bug season.

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Elkhartjim said:

Herman, you may want to consider this also. I use RejeX on the front of my motorhome including the windshield. It makes bug removal much easier especially during love bug season.

 

 

Beat me to it Jim! I will use that or RainX, they just skid across the glass and off to the side :P, kind of entertaining. Cleaning off any residue is simple afterwards.

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On 7/26/2017 at 8:16 AM, wolfe10 said:

I also wash mine. Either at home (storage barn) or with permission at some CG's.  About 2 hours.

Same here.  I don't trust some guy with a power washer....I don't want any water driven in where it should not be. I usually combine my wash with a refueling trip.  Normally, I'll take it out and run it on the interstate to get all temps and pressures up to normal operating range, refuel, then wash.  When I do that in the next few weeks the annual wax job will follow.

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The majority of parks will let you bucket wash the front of the MH after you arrive.

Ever tried the Bounce Dryer sheets.  Wet the windshield. Put a Bounce Dryer sheet on a squeegee softside and wipe he windshield with it. Do small sections at a time and rinse. Small sections being about 2 feet wide and the length of the windshield.  Also can be used on all of the front. 

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8 hours ago, wayne77590 said:

...The majority of parks will let you bucket wash the front of the MH after you arrive...

I always wash the bugs off the front on the first day I arrive at a new CG...whether I'm staying the night or a month.  Many have "no wash" policies, but I'm not washing the coach, I'm removing bugs....nobody has ever said anything to me about doing it.

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33 minutes ago, FIVE said:

I always wash the bugs off the front on the first day I arrive at a new CG...whether I'm staying the night or a month.  Many have "no wash" policies, but I'm not washing the coach, I'm removing bugs....nobody has ever said anything to me about doing it.

I do exactly the same.  MUCH easier before they get baked on.

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Replaced my center caps and lug covers. These are vented to allow hot air to escape, the center cap on the front can be removed to inspect oil levels easily, unlike the Monaco covers that came with it.

IMG_3774.JPG

IMG_3775.JPG

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I purchased a de-ionization filter station, can wash directly in CA sun during summer w/out spotting.  Use wax wash combo suds and hose it off.  Keeps rig shining

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In Texas. we have love bugs, butterflies and little sugar bees...Spring and fall it's suicide by coach!  HOT water and Dove on front, let it soak in for five minutes and wipe off.  Then use a good wax...If your staying, make it shine, if not then just leave it on as is.  30 minutes a day with a bottle of Lucas Slick Mist....we do bottom half and wheels daily when on the road and top half once a month.  Mother Nature washes our coach's as she see's fit.

40 foot DP and 45 foot.

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tim.  Do you have Alcoa wheels?  Any brand liquid soap & water will do....or a spray on, wipe off wax.  If you use a preservative on your tires stay away from petroleum base products, I use 303 protectant on all my rubber! :)

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11 hours ago, mailman said:

jleamont. the like new condition of your wheels is a wish for me

What did you use to get them that way

thanks   tim

Blue Magic Metal polishing cream and a Mothers polishing cone. Takes about 10 minutes a wheel. I put the polishing cone on a cordless drill after smearing the cream on the wheels and go at it, wipe it off when done with a towel.

The polish is safe on clear coated wheels (which those are).

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This is what I use on my Harley and have started using it on my RV's because I generally get stuck washing them with CG hard water.

Get a bottle of McGuires Gold Car Wash and a bottle of Turtle Ice Car Wash, mix them 50/50.  Use this blend as your soap.  Only wash and rinse about 1/3 of a side at a time and squeegee it off with a very soft blade.  You can also use a micro fiber towel to finish drying areas you can reach from the ground.  I only wax my RV once a year but when I wash them I use this process and it makes them look like they were just waxed again.  Of course I wax the Harley several times a year and use a leaf blower to dry it.

I won't use anything but 303 on my tires and anything else that is plastic, including rooftop air conditioner covers, etc.

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If the wheels are rough aged grey like they were on my coach when I bought it from lack of TLC, it is a lot more than ten minutes a wheel. It took me 30 minutes to do one front wheel while still on the coach with a buffer and polishing rouge. and I am still not done. I need to remove and actively sand them to eliminate the soft age corrosion. The backs are the worst. Besides sanding with 1,000, 1500, and lastly 2,000 wet NIKKON paper it is then a 3 step polishing job with the rouge and then what Joe did. My wheels two of them Alcoa and the other two ? were not clear coated.

Yes Joe, yours look terrific!  

B

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2 hours ago, RSBILLEDWARDS said:

were not clear coated

I made that mistake on a 09' jeep we owned a few years ago, thought I was saving a few $$ when I ordered the wheels, wow was that a mistake!! No matter what I did I couldn't keep those wheels shining.

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Joe.  The only good Jeep (Wrangler) is a dirty one! :lol: All others, delivered the kids to school & band practice! :(

BillE.  All Alcoa's are not the same...one type (the satin looking ones) is not intended to be waxed, just washed with S & W.  (NO not shot)!

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46 minutes ago, manholt said:

Joe.  The only good Jeep (Wrangler) is a dirty one! :lol: All others, delivered the kids to school & band practice! :(

BillE.  All Alcoa's are not the same...one type (the satin looking ones) is not intended to be waxed, just washed with S & W.  (NO not shot)!

Like these;

Non clear coated satin finished, once they are dirty they remain dirty, you can polish them some what shiny but after a week they look like this again.

IMG_0630.JPG

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Bill E. instead of all that sandpaper find some fine scotch bright, I believe it is gray in color and using a pad on a sanding disk you ca polish them up easy.

Joe same with the ones in the picture after you get them shiny wipe down with acetone and spray with clear coat.;)

Bill

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3M Scotch Brite Nylon Pads: 
White pad, called Light Duty Cleansing - (1000) 1200-1500 grit 

Light Grey, called Ultra Fine Hand - (600-800) 800 grit. 
 Green, called Light Duty Hand Pad - (600) 600 grit 
Maroon pad, called General Purpose Hand - (320-400) 320 grit 

 Brown pad, called Extra Duty Hand - (280-320) 240 grit 
Dark Grey pad, called Blending Pad (180-220) 150 grit 
Tan pad, called Heavy Duty Hand Pad - (120-150) 60 grit
 
(The value inside the parentheses is directly from 3M.) 
 

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