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bikeryder

Updating Drab Looking Entry Well Stairs - 2003 Monaco Cayman 36PBD

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Not picking on you but one of my pet peeves with the RV industry is they never prime , seal or paint wood that is in places water can get to it.

When you look under a new coach there is no paint on bare metal no paint on exposed wood.:(  

Press on you are doing great.

Bill 

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Returned from the hardware store with goodies in hand. I’ve sealed some previously drilled holes [and one breached small crack that I carelessly caused with a screwdriver removing that original dry rotted 3/4” plywood stair tread] on existing bottom galvanized stairwell plate with silicone. New 3/16” metal plate scrubbed, washed and rinsed clean, both sides. Fully primed [2 coats] and painted, both sides. Waiting for paint to dry in the warm California sun. I will also install mounting tape to hopefully eliminate any and all potential rattling, as well as seal each newly drilled anchoring screw hole [pics uploaded].  This is turning out to be a very enjoyable and rewarding project. I only wish I had decided to tackle this stairwell entry upgrade a year ago. Oh well. More later...

Eddie

 

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Success... Bottom 3/16” metal plate stair tread installed. Dimensions of required individual Corian pieces taken and recorded. Now it’s time to pay a visit to the kitchen contractor who will supply the custom cut Corian product. This phase may take awhile. More later...

Eddie

 

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I spent this past week visiting Corian suppliers and boy did I ever receive sticker shock. The average price just for the [6] cut to size / shape Corian pieces was nearly $3,000. Wow, that's about 1/3 more than I was willing to dish out. So here I find myself at yet another crossroad, mid-stream change in plan. I believe I'll opt for 1/8" thick polished aluminum diamond plate material for the [2] stairwell walls, and stair tread risers. I'm also considering utilizing this diamond plate material for the top of the slide out stairwell cover. I have received a hard material quote of under $150 for all required polished aluminum diamond plate material. I'll perform final shape cuts myself on the band saw. J-Cap aluminum trim material, roughly $50 with some additional miscellaneous screws and such. As much as I was truly looking forward to a Corian styled stair entry, I've seen some quite nicely done polished aluminum diamond plate stairwell entries on bus conversions. In the end, I believe I will be more than satisfied with the overall appearance of a polished aluminum diamond plate stairwell entry. Uploaded Quote on diamond plate material. More later...

Eddie

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On 1/14/2018 at 8:47 AM, bikeryder said:

 My concern was adding something solid that wouldn’t flex when stood on, and at same time not succumb to the elements such as moisture. I’d hate to end up with wood rot on bottom inside stair tread 

Eddie

Eddie,

Is the bottom of your step well Wood or sheet metal? If it is wood, will it not still get moisture from the bottom? If is sheet metal, can't it still get moisture from the underside? Also If it is sheet metal I would give it a good cleaning and several coats of primer before putting the plate down.

I enjoy the step by step pictures.

Good luck and we all look forward to seeing the finished product.

Herman 

 

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Eddie,

One nice thing is that the aluminum is just as durable as the corian at a fraction of the weight. :)  Is the wood under the 3/16" steel, marine grade? It looked like it to my eye.  In witch case you have no worry about wet rot, I would put a couple of coats of clear waeritain ( darn spell check) on it. 

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2 hours ago, hermanmullins said:

Eddie,

Is the bottom of your step well Wood or sheet metal? If it is wood, will it not still get moisture from the bottom? If is sheet metal, can't it still get moisture from the underside? Also If it is sheet metal I would give it a good cleaning and several coats of primer before putting the plate down.

Herman 

 

Herman, the bottom entry step is merely galvanized sheet metal. I had previously chiseled an old dry rotted 3/4” piece of marine plywood out. GR8 advice on cleaning and giving a good coat of primer...

Eddie

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53 minutes ago, manholt said:

Eddie,

One nice thing is that the aluminum is just as durable as the corian at a fraction of the weight. :)  Is the wood under the 3/16" steel, marine grade? It looked like it to my eye.  In witch case you have no worry about wet rot, I would put a couple of coats of clear waeritain ( darn spell check) on it. 

manholt, the newly fabricated 3/16” metal plate is screwed directly to the existing bottom galvanized steel, the wood has been removed. What I’m considering is possibly obtaining a 3/4” sheeting of High Density Polyethylene Plastic [those used in food preparation industry] between the new 3/16” metal plate and the finished tread material.

Eddie

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1 hour ago, bikeryder said:

What I’m considering is possibly obtaining a 3/4” sheeting of High Density Polyethylene Plastic [those used in food preparation industry] between the new 3/16” metal plate and the finished tread material

Half inch cement board will work great for this also, can be obtained at any building/flooring store, cheap, and with the 3/16 plate underneath, no give, and no rot.

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abyrd, kaypsmith, thanks so much for your thoughts and suggestions, always much appreciated.

I just noticed one of the quotes [uploaded] I received for the Corian product. This stuff is absolutely beautiful but extremely expensive.

Moving forward...

Eddie

 

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Eddie.

Price of Corian is $45 to $68 a sq. ft. installed.  I guess it's a California thing to be 300% higher than the rest of America.  So, by the quote above, if I apply it to my coach, I'm looking at 15% of my coach total worth at time of purchase!   I took a rough measurement of the corian in my coach =  230 sq. ft.

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Corian is expensive, but it is very easy to work. remember a regular saw, a router, and lots of sandpaper is all that is necessary to produce a beautiful set of steps for such a small project as yours. The glue that you use to put it together with is much the same as pvc pipe cement, but not the same. Here is a supplier that can supply sheets, or cut overstock pieces. http://solidsurface.com/sheet-material/overstock/corian?___SID=U&gclid=CjwKCAiA7ovTBRAQEiwAo8dPcYB7DpXfdq-4JnvgHD8-ZnpjkhKD7DQwO3xLC9Y16-qyP50ZaKdcWhoCcf4QAvD_BwE . Like I suggested, obtain a small piece, then cut and form something out of it to see how it works. The quote that you got is from a large facility, who neither wants or needs your business. Their regular clients are everyday, and they have machinery that costs millions of dollars, which has to be paid for. The diamond plate polished aluminum will look great also though. P.S. if you want to try corian,, I suggest that you stay with 1/2 inch thickness all the way, it is much easier to work with, for bull noses, simply double the thickness, then route the edges.

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Like most everything else in life, nothing is what it seems to be at first glance!  All my corian (it may not be by DuPont, their Patent ran out in mid 1990's, and is now made by dozens of Companies World Wide) is 3/8" thick, including the bull nose, the underlayment is marine grade, 1/2" to 5/8" thick!  corian or the look alike is just as strong at 3/8" as 2"!

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kaypsmith,

Thanks so very much for the link on remant Corian product. I've been reviewing availble inventory over these last few days. 

I've kept myself quite busy measuring [remeasuring], and making paper templates to be utilized in preparing for cutting both LEFT & RIGHT stairwell side wall aluminum diamond plate [MEASURE THREE TIMES -- CUT ONCE].

As a result, I made a slight adjustment / addition to my polished aluminum diamond plate. Total [out the door] price including [2] 8' lengths of J-Cap trim $198.23.

I pickup materials this coming Saturday afternoon.

Stair tread material the only remaining unknown at this point. More later . . .

Eddie

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One more thought for your project, mirror stainless steel for the side panels and the risers would also be very nice looking. You could work up a very nice looking etch design for the risers, which can be lazer etched, or you can make a layover with reverse design and sandblast that design to save money.  I borrowed this photo from another post to demonstrate what it can look like. I would suggest the use of 16 gauge as opposed to 20 for your project, also a good sheet metal shop can be helpful for this. Also, the polished diamond plate could be used for the stair treads, a good metal shop can bend it to form a good looking bull nose, it will look good for a couple years before the shine will start to disappear, at which time, a rubberized paint product can be used over it for a nice looking finish in the future. If you should decide on something like this, you can use those outdoor LED light strips that I mentioned earlier at each joint to hide the joint, and add a lighted appeal. Thanks for the photo Rick, I hope no copyright infringement, LOL, beautiful addition. Here is a source for the mirror ss, https://www.ebay.com/itm/STAINLESS-STEEL-SHEET-16-GA-ALLOY-430-MIRROR-36-X-48/311835541762?epid=820748306&hash=item489ad8c102:g:nREAAMXQDnpTZQDB

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This week has been very productive. Friday afternoon I picked up my 1/8” thick polished aluminum diamond plate material. Utilizing my left side & right side [stairwell wall] paper templates, I was able to replicate onto aluminum diamond plate material. The trimming process was much tougher than I had anticipated. I was so involved I completely lost track of time, working until 11:00pm. I need to add, I was freezing as temps dipped into the mid 40’s [I know, I know, many of you are probably laughing about now, considering mid 40’s to be a winter heatwave]. Saturday morning, I located and obtained some very nice quality chrome screw head cap covers. Both left side & right side stairwell sidewalls installed. Lower stairwell riser installed. Stairwell slide out floor cover with face plate completed, installed & operational. Overall, I’m quite pleased with the results thus far. I have much more detail work yet to go, progress pictures uploaded. More later...

Eddie

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kaypsmith, that is quite an attractive compass artwork plaque on that screen door. Definitely some good food for thought. As always, thanks so much for sharing... 👍

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You might want to get a piece of rug for your cover when your driving...The sun will make it hot and reflect the heat and blinding light, onto your DW !  Then she will make you see light's :o

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That’s a most excellent suggestion manholt. Thanks very much for your thought provoking input. Your thought about a rug had crossed my mind. Now, after your feedback I’m convinced. Upon completion of my stairwell upgrade project [lots more still to do], I shall most definitely search out a nice higher end / higher quality rug [after all, I just tore out ugly-drab-unappealing carpeting, yuck] with a rubberized bottom to keep it from wandering upon the new [blinding - bright aluminum diamond plate] slide-out stairwell cover. Hopefully I can find something heavy enough [industrial grade?], that will stay put as slide-out stairwell cover traverses between the open and closed positions. To find the appropriate sizing, high quality and weight it may well need to be a custom order...:rolleyes:

Eddie

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ryder,

Almost any carpet installer will have a remnant from a job you may get for free. you could have the edge bound and a bit of 3-M contact cement will secure it. It appears there is enough room for the carpet.

Herman

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Looks great! I snapped a photo of ours today. We were out shopping for some new coach stuff, tile for toilet area and new kitchen faucet. I'll post the faucet on a new thread, but here's the ugly mess I need to conquer 

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I have kept myself busy, slowly progressing inch by inch. 

First off, I decided to rip out the carpeting on the floor between the stairwell and the passenger side front dash wall [under dashboard]. I thought ridding the floor of the carpeting between stairwell and front dash wall would provide a more appealing overall appearance. 

At the same time I opted to remove the carpeting going up the front wall [again directly under dashboard], as well as removing the side wall carpeting between dash wall and entry door casing trim.

I made the floor trim piece [stairwell entry] complete with bull nose from ½” thick solid birch hardwood [natural color, unstained] with two coats of varnish. I had the corner joints mitered with 45º degree cuts, adding wooden biscuits to strengthen the joints. I maintained the 6 ½” dimension between stairwell wall and front dash wall, on all three side of stairwell entry floor trim piece. The first thing you’ll notice is this floor trim is wider than what is normally installed. But I must say, considering the fact I eliminated the carpet between the stairwell and front wall under dash, I do like the overall feel [appearance]. BTW, I did consider making a smaller width floor trim piece, and then installing flooring material between the floor trim piece and front wall, however in the end I opted to simply make the larger stairwell floor trim.

The front dash wall paneling is 1/8” birch [natural color, unstained] also with two coats of varnish. I still need to fabricate the side wall paneling piece between dash and entry door casing trim. I needed to hold off until after installing front wall panel prior to attempting to cut the side wall panel piece.

The carpeting is quite old and in great need of replacement. But for the time being it has to stay, as I cannot afford the replacement cost. As I cut the carpet [being so old] it didn’t cooperate as I would have liked [frustrating], resulting in an undesirable small gap between cut carpet and stairwell floor trim. I’ll have to figure out a suitable carpet fill trim [wood, metal, fabric?].

Oh, I almost forgot. I also installed [one] stairwell light. It is all wired in, I only need to install the wiring to the switch.

I’ve uploaded pictures.

Lots more detail work yet to do!

Sorry, I believe I uploaded pictures in reverse order. More recent pics at top.

More later…

Eddie

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