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Flat Tow Tow Bar Choices

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Welcome to the forum. I haven't heard anything negative about the Ready Brute Elite. Most of the systems that don't connect to the coach rely on some type of surge activation.

Bill

 

 

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The only complaints I have heard was trying to get the cable adjusted properly. It’s either too tight and over braking the Toad or too loose and not applying the brakes. When the cable seems right along comes a big hill and that goes about the window quickly. I considered one until I heard about the frequency of fussing with the cable adjustment. 

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3dognights,

I use the ready brake and I have a 2003 Monaco Windsor 40’  towing a Saturn Vue. It works just fine. The Vue weighs 3680#. If I were towing something a lot heavier I would probably go with G&S. 

Paul

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On ‎7‎/‎29‎/‎2018 at 7:08 AM, hermanmullins said:

Joe,

I am not disputing that the aluminum tow bar is weak as you showed in your picture. However I did notice that on the bar there was indication it had been torqued really bad in one direction. Just my observation. 

Herman 

Since you feel the aluminum tow bar is weak. Is yours that has worked well an aluminum or do you have a heavier duty model?

 

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Sorry, I wasn't saying that I feel the Aluminum tow bar is weak. What I was saying was that I wasn't disputing his statement since I have now personal knowledge one way or the other. Yes I have the Steel Heavy Duty 10,000 lb Blue Ox and it performs well for us.

Herman

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I always recommend geting a towbar that is at least 10,000 pound rating. That way you can tow nearly anything. If you start with a smaller bar you don't have the reserve strength and larger safety margin.

Bill

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Sorry Bill, not buying that one!  A 5,000 pound rated coach, does not need a 10,000 pound hitch for any reason or a 10,000 pound tow bar!:wacko:

Keep in mind, a lot of newbies, read or are on this Forum and we do not give out miss information!

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18 hours ago, manholt said:

Sorry Bill, not buying that one!  A 5,000 pound rated coach, does not need a 10,000 pound hitch for any reason or a 10,000 pound tow bar!:wacko:

Keep in mind, a lot of newbies, read or are on this Forum and we do not give out miss information!

Please explain what miss information I am giving out. What I stated is absolutely true and correct. A 10,00 lb rated towbar will have more reserve strength whether it is used in a 5000 lb receiver or a 20,000lb receiver. The main core subject of this thread is that aluminum towbars can break. So tell me why you think it is smart to use a minamaley capable tow bar or one that has a good reserve strength.

Bill

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1 hour ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

So tell me why you think it is smart to use a minamaley capable tow bar or one that has a good reserve strength.

Agreed Bill, the extra strength does not make the towing rig capable of towing 10,000#, but the next one that I buy may be, and I might want to tow a Hummer when I buy my next coach. LOL!:ph34r:

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I was referring to the person who reads the Forum as a first time owner of a Motorhome.  They have a coach, rated for 5,000 pound tow and after reading your comment, go and get a 10,000 pound bar, 16 foot trailer and put 8,000 pounds in it !  We see that combo all the time and we know better!  But, the Newbie don't....Just like the Sales man, who tells the first time buyer of a 16,000 pound 5'er, "you can pull this unit with your F-150, No Problem"!   :blink:

Most of the folks on this Forum, knew exactly what you was talking about, but this is not our first Rodeo! :)

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I love it when somebody recommends replacing the 5000# hitch on the motorhome with a 10,000# hitch to increase the towing capacity. That will solve all your towing issues - NOT!

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Hay, if putting a 10,000 lb hitch on inplace of a 5,000 lb hitch and it improves towing capacity then I am going to put a Z71 decal on my Saturn Vue so I can go rock climbing.:rolleyes:

Herman 

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1 hour ago, elkhartjim said:

I love it when somebody recommends replacing the 5000# hitch on the motorhome with a 10,000# hitch to increase the towing capacity. That will solve all your towing issues - NOT!

Ya, could be a little misleading for a newbie, but Bill's comment above is right on and is talking about reserve strength of the TOWBAR, NOT CHANGE IN COACH TOWING CAPACITY:

"Please explain what miss information I am giving out. What I stated is absolutely true and correct. A 10,00 lb rated towbar will have more reserve strength whether it is used in a 5000 lb receiver or a 20,000lb receiver. The main core subject of this thread is that aluminum towbars can break. So tell me why you think it is smart to use a minamaley capable tow bar or one that has a good reserve strength."

Bill

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I purchased a 10k tow bar just for that. Even though our Lincoln is roughly 4k I wanted the reserve and not be near max with a smaller one. Plus if we ever get a heavier toad I don't need to upgrade. I also have the 10k safety cables.

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Getting a heavy duty (10,000 capacity) tow bar is ok, but I am willing to bet you already had 10,000 lb rated Hitch. Right?

Let prefecit with saying there are some Manufacturers out there that will put on a lower rated hitch just to save a $ or 2. 

Herman

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The new Blue OX 7500 is a combination of the original aluminum one and now steel shafts and bushes inside. I acquired one of the original ones and had OX check it in January. I did not leave with it either but with the new one that replaced it. Initially they gave me the 10,000 pound one. The kid politely hauled it out and put it in the tracker for me. When I arrived back at the desert camp site and started to pull it out of the Tracker I would have smashed my fingers had it not been in a box. Yes a loooot of reserve strength for pulling a 3,300 pound Tracker or a 3,200 pound jeep. Needless to say I left it in the car and returned it for the lesser unit and still have double the capacity needed and a 1/3 less weight to jerk around. Yes I could have handled the weight but why, I am already 2 inches shorter than I was 9 years ago after moving all the rock and logs around this house I built, I can barely see over the steering wheel now..😁

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Thank you all for your replies. My decision was actually made by happenstance. A friend, now of a widow, who had sold her coach, after her husband had passed. For some reason she had kept the towing package. I was able to buy the Roadmaster tow bar, even brake, and wireless lights for roughly half price. May have been used once or twice. I am having the base-plates installed on our Honda CRV  this week. Then we are ready to tow. Before we head off into the sunset, I still need a Kayak and bike carrier. My preference would be a combo roof system to mount to the CRV. Has anyone had any experience in this area?

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Studebrucer --

What type Roadmaster tow bar did you purchase for HALF PRICE!!   Two year ago I purchased a Roadmaster Sterling All-Terrain aluminum tow bar for my Jeep Wrangler Unlimited.  Being partially manufactured from aluminum, the Sterling All-Terrain is lower weight (only 30 lbs.) compared to an all steel two bar and thus is easier to handle.   The Sterling All-Terrain has an 8,000 lbs. rating which is plenty good for my Jeep.   My motorhome has a 5,000 lbs. rated receiver hence why I purchased a Jeep Wrangler as my tow vehicle as the FMCA 2016 Towable Guide showed the Wrangler Unlimited has a curb weight of ~4,100 lbs.

I have been very pleased with the Roadmaster Sterling All-Terrain aluminum tow bar.

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1 hour ago, fagnaml said:

Studebrucer --

What type Roadmaster tow bar did you purchase for HALF PRICE!!   Two year ago I purchased a Roadmaster Sterling All-Terrain aluminum tow bar for my Jeep Wrangler Unlimited.  Being partially manufactured from aluminum, the Sterling All-Terrain is lower weight (only 30 lbs.) compared to an all steel two bar and thus is easier to handle.   The Sterling All-Terrain has an 8,000 lbs. rating which is plenty good for my Jeep.   My motorhome has a 5,000 lbs. rated receiver hence why I purchased a Jeep Wrangler as my tow vehicle as the FMCA 2016 Towable Guide showed the Wrangler Unlimited has a curb weight of ~4,100 lbs.

I have been very pleased with the Roadmaster Sterling All-Terrain aluminum tow bar.

Mike, two door Wrangler?

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My 2016 Jeep is a Wrangler Unlimited Sahara edition.  For all Jeep Wranglers, the "Unlimited" model means four door version.  Sahara edition means higher trim level (e.g. body paint hard top) versus the Sport edition (black paint hard top).   The Sahara version is plenty capable for navigating the many concreate trails of the Houston urban jungle, getting into tight parking spaces and for some quite good off road fun.   I opted not to get the Rubicon version which is heavier than a Sahara and has a lot of serious off-road capabilities (e.g. rock climbing) that I don't need.

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Mike, I missed the Unlimited in your post. We have a 14 Unlimited Polar edition, had it weighed it was 4850. I guess the steel bumpers I put on, lift and larger tires bumped it up. Your low weight made me think it was a 2 door

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