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We have a 1998 Tiffin Allegro Bus with 35K miles on Cummings 330, Freightliner chassis. I had checked once before on extended warranty and the company I checked into said they wouldn't do it because it was too old.
Yesterday I checked with Wholesale Warranties and they said they would. The age of the MH is right on the cutoff. Next year they will only go back to 1999. They recommended a drivetrain warranty, which covers any thing that makes the motorhome go down the road (except the wind). They offer a 3 year plan for a total of $3147 for the 3 years + a one time $450 inspection fee.
Question is "Do I" or Don't I", I have some mixed feelings about it. Any one have experience with this company and/or older motorhomes with low mileage?

 

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Two questions:

How well do you maintain your coach?  The Cummins C engine and Allison 3000 are pretty bomb proof.

What likely failure points are excluded from the service policy.

 

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I have had the coach for 2 years, it had 28K miles when I bought it. Put 2K on it bringing it from Ventura CA to Colorado Springs CO.  I have it serviced once a year, about every 4K miles.  We made 1 long trip last year to Yuma AZ and back, then a couple of short trips here in CO.  Getting it serviced in Dec. before heading out for about 6 wks. in Dec/Jan.  

Motorhome Coverage Details 


1.     Chassis Engine Components - Engine block and/or replaceable cylinder sleeves and heads, if damaged as a result of the failure of an internally-lubricated part; all internally-lubricated parts contained within the engine block, including but not limited to: valves, valve springs, valve guides, valve covers, pistons and pins, main and rod bearings, crankshaft, camshaft, lifters, cam bearings, oil pump, rocker arms, push rods, timing chain, timing gears and timing chain tensioner. Timing cover, flywheel, flywheel ring gear, flex plate, vacuum pump, engine mounts, dipstick and tube, intake manifold, oil pan, turbocharger and all internal parts, diesel injectors and injector pump.

2.     Transmission Components - Transmission case, if damaged as a result of the failure of an internally-lubricated part; all internally-lubricated parts within the transmission case including: torque converter, bands, clutches, gears, front pump, shafts, shift forks, synchronizers, shift solenoids, internal switches and sensors. Transmission mounts and transmission oil pan.

3.     Drive Axle Components - Drive axle housing, if damaged as a result of the failure of an internally-lubricated part; all internally-lubricated parts within the drive axle housing, axle shafts, axle housing, universal joints, constant velocity joints, locking hub mechanisms, wheel bearings, drive shafts and center bearing.

4.     Engine Cooling Components - Water pump, radiator, cooling fan blades, fan clutch, hydraulic or electric fan motor, heater core, fan shroud and coolant recovery tank.

5.     Steering Components - Steering gear housing and all internally-lubricated parts, control valve, steering cylinder, rack and pinion, factory-installed steering stabilizer, internal steering column shafts, steering pump, main and intermediate shafts and couplings.

6.     Fuel Delivery Components - Fuel pump, fuel tanks, metal fuel lines, fuel injection pump, fuel injectors, fuel pressure regulator, auxiliary fuel tank switch and fuel lift pump.

7.     Chassis Air Conditioning Components Compressor, compressor clutch, clutch bearing, field coil, receiver dryer, accumulator, condenser, idler pulley, evaporator, blower fan and motor, high/low cut-off switches, pressure hose assemblies, refrigerant (when in conjunction with a covered repair).

8.     Electrical Components Alternator, starter, starter drive, starter solenoid, voltage regulator, distributor, manually-operated switches, ignition switch, windshield wiper motor and washer pump, power window motors, power window gears and regulators, and dual battery paralleling switch.

9.     Suspension Components Upper and lower control arms, control arm shaft and bushings, upper and lower ball joints, steering spindles and supports, leaf and coil springs, spring shackles and bushings, rubber suspension springs, factory installed suspension compressor, air lines and suspension air bags.

10.   Brake Components Master cylinder, hydraulic or vacuum brake booster, wheel cylinders, magnets calipers, drums and rotors (when in conjunction with a covered repair), combination valve, metal-only hydraulic tubing and metal fittings. ABS pressure modulator, accumulator, Air brake compressor, lines, treadle valve, compensating valve, actuator and diaphragm and slack adjusters. 

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Speck,

I agree with Wolfe 10. As the owner of the same year and low mileage Tiffin, if the unit has been well serviced and maintained I would put that money in my pocket and wait for a rainy day. Besides normal services oil change ect., I have only had to replace exhaust gaskets at around 75000 At a cost of around $300 for parts and a quote of $350 labor, ended up doing it myself.

I do not have much experience with extended warranties, but I have heard some horror stories. I had a friend who in order to purchase the coverage, had to do some extensive repairs on issues they found at the inspection. Then a year or two in had to fight like crazy on a claim that they ended paying only 40-50% of the repair after the deductible and none of the towing.  

Gary

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Gary,

Thanks for your reply.  I am just north of you, in Colorado Springs.  I go down to Rocky Ford duck hunting, maybe meet you sometime.

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I am for the self insured camp. I  have heard to many horror stories. of them denying coverage over minor issues. Then you are out the cost of the insurance and the cost of the repair. You might consider finding a good teck to do a inspection. I am betting with the low milage and if you are diligent in doing maintenance you should be ok. 

Just as a example I  have a 2003 coach with 91,000 miles. in the last 6 years I have replaced the convection /microwave $425.00 and a air conditioner fan motor. $118.00 and one air hose for about $275.00 (road side issue.) I think I would have some money left in the bank verses $6294.00 for insurance that doesn't always cover everything.

Bill

 

 

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I too am in the self insured camp. The only issue I have had is a drive shaft loss and turns out I was not greasing the U joints properly. How is that you might ask. I always greased it every season but always loaded...in Park, while the park brake was probably on, nope that is incorrect. The wheels should be chocked and the rig in neutral anad the Park brake off, no load on it. It should have some looseness to the shaft and it will take the grease properly.

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Extended Warranties are where the REAL money is for dealers!  Not the RV sale itself.  Just got a brand new RV, and they laid out a plethora of warranties we could buy.  Up to almost $7,000 (for a $60K RV)!!!  We did NOT take a single one.  If something was to break, it most likely will happen under all existing warranties that come with the RV already.

Mechanical & electrical/electronic breakdowns vs. time happen with a "bathtub curve"; way more than nominal failures early, then very low breakdowns for many years, then failure rate curves upwards, as stuff actually wears out.

The-bathtub-curve-of-failure-rate-8.png

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Have a friend with a BAFARI, last one of two built as Beaver/Safari went under. along the way they bought a Good Sam warranty. Just a month or so early summer 2018 the engine developed a problem that turned catastrophic in Missouri. Good Sam was on it like white on rice! New engine complete 30 grand and their part was around 2 thousand or less. Sometimes  and the right adjuster, it pays off... My luck like playing LOTTO

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Thanks to everyone for your input.  You have given me the exact information I need to make my decision, Thanks again.  

rsbilledwards:  Think we might have the same friend, Mike and Donna from CA.

 

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I generally have to see some type of additional reason to purchase any type of extended warranty, and even then if I'm buying from a dealer they better be reducing that price by about 40% or more.

With our current RV we are full time and towing almost 10,000 pounds so I added some coverage.

Recent new car purchase.  Vehicle came with black painted rims.  I could see rubbing one of those against a curb so we went with coverage after the dealer dropped it down to $1,200.  Within a couple months we haven't screwed up the rims but we did lose a $350 fob which was covered under the extended warranty.

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Speck...Thet would be the same...lucky guys they were. In addition to that story, they were here visiting and as they were leaving heading out I 70 West up Mount Vernon Canyon a heater hose blew as it entered the basement on the left side. It blew out 6 or 8 plus gallons of coolant. Mike caught it pretty quick but on the side of the road again. They called a tech on a Sunday in Loveland an hour + away on a Sunday and then called me hollering for help. I was 15 minutes away and aside from chasing parts had him on the road in two hours. I bypassed the heating system, filled him back up and away they went. Moral of this story, carry a spare length of heater hose about 3/4 feet long if you have a 3126 B Cat. Use the water from the coach to bail yourself out of trouble. Change back to real coolant later where is is convenient.   

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We purchased this MH from a man who had stored it in his barn for 8 years due to illness (on consignment). We figured things would break and fail after sitting all that time, and bought a 3 yr inclusionary ESC.w/ gaskets and seal rider.  It paid for itself  during the contract period, including deductibles.

Now on a different RVing forum, a man had had his Cummins 650HP engine drop the valves in #6 cylinder. The total repair bill was $30,000, he did not have an ESC.

Without the gaskets and seals rider, everything that happens due to a failed gasket or seal is NOT covered, it's called consequential damage.

 

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