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vameyprez

Grill Propane Tank

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vameyprez,

Welcome to the FMCA Forum.

Please tell us what vehicle you will be transporting it in:  motorhome, trailer, truck, other.

The more specific the detail the better the answers.

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Two factors:

Secure it from moving AND since propane is heavier than air, code calls for it to be in a compartment with vent below or in an open compartment.

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Just for info in addition to the vent requirement, DOT says that it must be in a non lockable compartment if carried inside.

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If you look a Joe picture, you will notice that it is being transported in the upright position.  When I have any compressed gas delivered to my shop they are always shipped upright.  Once in use such as a forklift it can be on the side if design to be used that way.  

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48 minutes ago, huffypuff said:

Once in use such as a forklift it can be on the side if design to be used that way.  

All the forklift propane tanks I have ever seen are made to be installed on their side.

Bill

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9 minutes ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

All the forklift propane tanks I have ever seen are made to be installed on their side.

Bill

most  See above statement.  Once in use such as a forklift it can be on the side if design to be used that way.  

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6 minutes ago, huffypuff said:

most

True, there is always some oddball set up. There was about 150 propane powered forklifts where I use to work in all kinds of different configurations and vintages.

Bill

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46 minutes ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

True, there is always some oddball set up. There was about 150 propane powered forklifts where I use to work in all kinds of different configurations and vintages.

Bill

We had a Buffalo 10 ton military surplus that started on gas then switch to diesel.  That forklift was a beast and we use it mostly lifting wrecked cars by the side and moving where we wanted.  It was a WWII item.  

Link similar what we had.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LsBOw3txME

 

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We had a yard forklift that was WW2 vintage that had close to 40 ton capacity. They only brought it out to move the big propane tanks.:P

Had to stay on topic. ;)

Bill

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Staying with both the original topic and the off-shoot, our LP tanks are actually forklift tanks. They are mounted horizontally in a bay, inside an airtight partition which has vents on the floor of the bay to the outside.

One big word of caution I received when I had an issue with our tanks last year was to be absolutely certain that any LP which leaks from the tank(s) cannot be ingested by a diesel engine, either on the coach itself or on the generator. Nothing like a little stray LP gas to get a diesel engine running way too fast until something catastrophic happens (like a runaway engine). Since some diesel engines use LP injection to boost power, it's easy to see the problem stray gas could cause.

LP tanks should not be stored in the same bay as your generator to prevent problems.

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