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urbanhermit

The dealer recommended Hankook -- seeking advice

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Have a 2006 Monaco Cayman 35, GRVW 33,000.  It is shod with Goodyear 670s in 255/70 R22.5, all six years old.  I like their performance.  Road noise doesn't rise to conscious level, no wandering, only the slightest wind push from passing semis (have a steering stabilizer).  Good tread, no cracks in the side walls, but I assume at their prudent replacement age.  A heavy truck tire/chassis shop recommends Hankooks.  Pretty good price, $2,845 out the door with glass beads.  A mostly auto discount tire store quoted $3,141 for six of the same Goodyears, tires and tax only -- no mounting or balancing.  I consider that a benchmark, not a price to consider.  Any advice about Hankoooks or other empassioned recommendations? 

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I've ran Hankook's for years with no problems in either ride, steering, swaying or any other problems that I didn't cause.

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There are several up and coming truck tire brands that are IMO of the same quality as Michelin or Goodyear at approx. 1/2 2/3 the price. I am well satisfied with the Sailun truck tires I now run. Hankook is becoming widely known.

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When I replace my 8 in 2022, they will be either Hankook or TOYO!  365/80/22.5.

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Could be a lack of interest.  Most people, RV or car, think that Michelin is the "Holly Grail." in tires!

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Thanks to all.  The recommending dealership is well established and well respected, but y'all have added confidence. 

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18 months ago I purchased a full set of Hankook AH37 tires (275/70R22.5) for my coach to replace four year old OEM Michelin ZXE tires that had pre-mature sidewall cracking (which I have since learned is a problem with Michelin tires).    I purchased the Hankook's using the FMCA price discount program that was in place with Hankook at that time.  The "all in" cost for the six tires was $2,450 which was 60% lower that prices available from FMCA's discount program with Michelin and Continental.   While still being blessed with a full time career, the wife and I only drive our coach ~5,000 miles per year thus I couldn't justify the much higher cost for Michelins/Continentals when my tires will age-out long before they wear-out.

I have not noticed any difference in ride nor handling between the Hankooks and the OEM MIchelins and highly recommend Hankooks as great quality tire and a more affordable price. 

I am surprised and disappointed that the FMCA - Hankook tire discount program came to an end.   

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4 hours ago, manholt said:

Most people, RV or car, think that Michelin is the "Holly Grail." in tires!

Michelin engaged in an extremely successful ad campaign when radial ply tires were first introduced for passenger vehicles.  I think they've been riding that wave ever since to command a price premium relative to most other brands.

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I ran Hankooks on my big 5th wheel and never an issue.  I know several folks running Hnakooks on their class A pusher and no issues.  A few that I know run them on their 1 ton trucks.

When I put tires on my dually last month, I went to Cooper tires.  The last two sets on Michelin tires did not wear as well as they had in the past.

Ken

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15 hours ago, docj said:

Michelin engaged in an extremely successful ad campaign when radial ply tires were first introduced for passenger vehicles.  I think they've been riding that wave ever since to command a price premium relative to most other brands.

I've used Michelin as replacement tires on all the passenger vehicles we've owned in the last quarter-century, expcept one, where I opted to Toyos, a brand I'd been pleased with a decade earler.  I was disappointed with the Toyos, though they weren't bad.  Pricy or not, I'll continue to put Michelins on our cars (asssuming, at our "experienced" ages, we need to buy more) -- tried and true, if admittedly probably overpriced.  But thanks to y'all, I fully intend to put Hankooks on Mother Superior within the year. 

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It seems to me, that Michelin does fine on cars and pickups.  But there has been a rash of problems with Michelins on MHs....including mine.  Mine cracked badly at five and a half years.  Always covered, always put 303 on them, always properly inflated....just cracked, and I'll never use them again on any vehicle.

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4 hours ago, five said:

It seems to me, that Michelin does fine on cars and pickups.  But there has been a rash of problems with Michelins on MHs....including mine.  Mine cracked badly at five and a half years.  Always covered, always put 303 on them, always properly inflated....just cracked, and I'll never use them again on any vehicle.

There are several USDOT/NTSB documents stating lack of use causes sidewall cracks.This is one: https://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/Documents/2014_Tire_Safety_SYM_Panel_4b_Kane.pdf

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Ray, you may have a lack of use!  Most of us don't, and like FIVE my last set (before I got current coach) was just over 4 years old and you could see the side core on the Michelin's, cracks where deep & the Tire shop that replaced all 8 with BFG's in NJ, told me I had maybe 1000 miles left, if that.  We had a 7,000+/- trip to Canada, that we where on...I put 9,700 miles on the BFG's by the time we got back to Texas!  We normally put 14,000 miles a year on coach.

The tires on my current coach is 365/80/22.5 Michelins, 3 years 7 month old, per DOT.  I'm keeping a vary eye on them and if we do go to Alaska this summer, I might change them out for new shoes....

urbanhermit.  I would not run TOYO's on my cars or LT/Trucks, heavy coach, yes!  We have Pirelli's on the cars and NITTO's on Jeeps and trucks (NITTO is made by TOYO)!  

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Put a set of Pirelli's on a 1969 Citroen ID19.  As I recall they weren't as grippy as I expected.  They were advertising themselves as "the rain tire" in those days.,   I may have expected too much in my callow youth. 

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On 4/8/2021 at 10:25 PM, rayin said:

There are several USDOT/NTSB documents stating lack of use causes sidewall cracks.This is one: https://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/Documents/2014_Tire_Safety_SYM_Panel_4b_Kane.pdf

While this is true, some brands seem to handle it better than others. It's also well documented that Michelin tires will show cracks far earlier than other brands will with similar usage patterns.

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That''s right, Richard, Michelin truck tire pdf contains a cautionary statement about non-use creating sidewall cracks. pg 8 of the Michelin RV tire handbook

Michelin is the only tire mfgr. I''m aware of that issues such a statement or tire checking chart.

Edited by rayin

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I put new tires on my coach last year (Firestone FS 561). They replaced a nearly 10-year-old set of Firestones. Other than the date codes, there was non visible reason to replace them. They had no sidewall cracking, no visible wear to the tread, and passed inspection when dismounted. I was considering trying to get another year or so from them but decided to swap them out since they were not the correct size (wider than recommended). 

Not all tires will crack with age.

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Tire dealer told me that I could have run them some more based on his examination. Still looked good inside and out. If not for the size issue I would probably have gotten another year from them. Longer if I were a gambling man.

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On 6/27/2021 at 6:15 PM, manholt said:

How did the 10 year old tires look on the inside?

Visual of the inside of a tire may reveal something you do not see on the outside of a tire when mounted   B U T

you are still not seeing the critical location of a tire which for radials is inside the structure at the outer ends of the steel belts.

Unless you have specialized inspection equipment ($$$$$$$$$) you can't "see"  the location of interest.

Photograph of the acousto- ultrasonic tire inspection machine [27] |  Download Scientific Diagram

 

Based on years of experience 10 years is the MAX for tire use as the odds are against you.

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On 4/6/2021 at 1:43 PM, urbanhermit said:

Have a 2006 Monaco Cayman 35, GRVW 33,000.  It is shod with Goodyear 670s in 255/70 R22.5, all six years old.  I like their performance.  Road noise doesn't rise to conscious level, no wandering, only the slightest wind push from passing semis (have a steering stabilizer).  Good tread, no cracks in the side walls, but I assume at their prudent replacement age.  A heavy truck tire/chassis shop recommends Hankooks.  Pretty good price, $2,845 out the door with glass beads.  A mostly auto discount tire store quoted $3,141 for six of the same Goodyears, tires and tax only -- no mounting or balancing.  I consider that a benchmark, not a price to consider.  Any advice about Hankoooks or other empassioned recommendations? 

Be careful with "beads". Some tire companies may VOID the warranty if they learn you have used something inside the tire.

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