Jump to content
wolfe10

Wi-Fi Booster and Antenna

Recommended Posts

When I get back if enough are interested I will put together a set of instructions and add the part numbers and where to purchase all the items!

Wonder whether you have ever done this? I think I get it - but anything more might help!

Thanks.

Jim Baird

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wonder whether you have ever done this? I think I get it - but anything more might help!

Thanks.

Jim Baird

Hello Jim,

Sorry, I have not put that together. After I got back from overseas we headed out on a trip through Canada and the east coast. One user did order the equipment and he had a problem with the newer version of the bullet. I believe I found a solution for his setup but waiting on him to answer an e-mail to me before I know it worked. As soon as he answers my e-mail I will put together the list and suppliers for the equipment.

Ronnie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have personally verified that the latest version of the Bullet M2 software fixed the problem the other person was having.

Here is my latest Internet setup in our MH:

Ubiquiti Bullet M2, b/g/n, 600mw (CP-BULL-M2H) $79.00

8dBI vertical antenna (AT-8OM-24) $29.00

Bullet and antenna are attached to the ladder with CAT-5 running inside

Cradlepoint MBR-900 router (MBR-900) $149.95

AT&T Lighting USB device

All are ran off the 12vdc house batteries

With this setup I can have multiple computers on the Internet while traveling or stopped. I have two laptops, a RVPuter, and my iPhone that connect to the router via WiFi.

The Ubiquiti Bullet M2 and antenna were purchased from Titan Wireless out of Austin, Texas http://www.titanwirelessonline.com/

The Cradlepoint MBR-900 router can be purchased directly from Cradlepoint via their website, http://www.cradlepoint.com/ or you may be able to locate a dealer near you also.

The AT&T Lighting USB device is made by Sierra Wireless, model 305. You can use just about any cellular companies 3G/4G USB card in the Cradlepoint.

If you do not need the ability to connect via cellular then you can use just about any wireless router and connect the bullet to the Internet or WAN port on the router. If you do not need to connect multiple computers then you can connect the bullet directly to your computer.

You will need to connect your computer to the bullet to configure it. On my setup I do this by disconnecting the bullet from the WAN port on the router, then connect it to one of the LAN ports on the router. This allows me to then connect to the Bullet and configure it for the AP that I want to connect to.

Once configured I unplug it from the LAN port and plug it into the WAN port. This sounds complicated but only takes about 2 minutes to get connected once I am at a campground.

I try to make time over the next couple of weeks to create a PDF with screen shots on how to configure the Bullet M2 and etc to make it easy for a non-computer person to make it work with minimal hassle. Once I have created it I will post it on this thread as an attachment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Texnet,

I am very interested in your Ubiquiti Bullet setup. My Bricks & Sticks Internet connection is via Ubiquiti gear and is quite reliable, and the service provider swears by it's reliability. My main problem is my Safari Serengeti coach's metal skin, Not Good for WiFi Reception at Parks. Then I compound that problem with a very "Aged Laptop", an IBM ThinkPad T30 with an early WiFi setup. I am considering a Ubiquiti WifiStation-EXT due to it's ability to receive power from the laptop via a USB connection. My goal here is to get the optimum Wifi Reception from the Outside of the Metal Skinned Coach to the Inside and the T30 Laptop. Please "Critique" my plan, and add or subtract any thoughts/options, i.e., a different antenna on the WifiStation-EXT.

Thanks -- JohnQ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I posted this on the Escapees forum last week and thought it might be of interest to readers here:

For most of this traveling summer I've been accessing distant wifi APs using a Pepwave Surf (http://www.pepwave.com/products/surf/) and a Hawking 15bBi Corner Antenna (http://www.hawkingtech.com/products/produc...&ProdID=152), both purchased from the 3G Store. Because the Hawking antenna is designed for indoor use, I've had to wrap in it a ziplock bag before hoisting it on the extendable pole (attached to the roof ladder) I carry in our motorhome basement. Overall, I've been very pleased with the ability of this simple system to pull in signals from up to a half-mile distant. Still, I've yearned for even better reception. As someone who follows this thread carefully, I decided that my next step up the tech ladder should be the much-vaunted Nanostation2. Understanding in advance that a higher level of networking skills might be required, I ordered a Nano2 and today I finally had the time to try it out. We're currently staying in an RV Resort here in Mesa, AZ for the winter, so there are many APs around me in this location. When I had the Nano2 hoisted on the pole (about 20' above ground level), I expected to pull in many additional APs than I had found with the Pepwave/Hawking combination. But I didn't -- there was nothing new in my local wifi universe with the supposedly more powerful Nanostation2. There may be several good reasons for this, and I freely concede that I'm a rank amateur in this field. But here are my observations about this informal comparison:

1. The Pepwave is much simpler to use and requires no serious network expertise.

2. The Nano's power-over-ethernet cable configuration and weather-proof construction are true advantages over the Hawking Corner antenna I'm using. The higher I raise my Hawking antenna, the more antenna cable I use. And the longer then cable, the greater the signal degradation. I believe you can lift the Nano something like 300' before you suffer any ethernet signal loss. Plus the Nano is built for outdoor use. The Corner Antenna isn't.

3. The networking setup on the Nano wasn't as difficult as I thought (I'm using a Mac, not a PC). But if you want to share the Nano's signal with neighbors or other computers in your motorhome, you need to connect it to a router. With the Pepwave, it broadcasts its own signal. The Pepwave is basically a router, the Nano isn't. That's a big plus for the Pepwave/Corner Station alternative.

In my view, the Pepwave/Hawking Corner Antenna solution for pulling in a distant wifi signal is very much underestimated. Yes, you have to wrap the Corner Antenna in plastic if you wish to use it outdoors, but that's not a big deal. And the fact that the Pepwave is a wireless router and its so simple to use are very compelling features for tech-challenged users like myself. So I'm putting my Nanostation2 on eBay tonight and going forward with the Pepwave/Corner Antenna solution. Until I hear of something better, of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cross Posted from my Safari MH Website:

Just a report on a "Combination of adapters/cables/antenna" that I got. First the problem is our metal skinned coaches, not good for WiFi reception unless

your laptop is pointing out a window. Your laptop's WiFi antenna is merely a thin wire loop running around the display screen, again not a really good

antenna for reception. Well we went down to Portland (SalesTaxFreeLand!!!!) for a GrandKiddies fix and shopping, and I got a trip to Frey's in Wilsonville.

After much discussion with a 20 something expert, I wound up buying a Hawking HWUNG Hi-Gain Wireless-N USB Adapter (has a removeable short antenna), Trendnet Low Loss Reverse SMA to N-Type cable (8 meters), and an Omni-directional Trendnet 8 db TWE-A0080 outdoor antenna (with right angle mount).

First test was here at home where my Sticks & Bricks home network is a 11 mbps Link-Sys wire & wireless router. Very good reception & internet speeds. I installed the Hawking software via a DVD which was very easy to follow and simple to do. Then it instructed me to plug in the Hawking USB Adapter & save the existing Profile. Did that and no problems, and that's when I looked down at the lower right corner of the screen and noticed 2 connection icons. Clicked on the linksys one & it showed a status as excellent at 11 Mbps. I clicked on the new second icon and was shocked to say the least. It showed a status of Excellent & 54 Mbps speed, WOW'zers, that is FAST. Apparently I was direct connecting to the radio station repeater that is on my property directly and not going through the Link-Sys router. Blazing internet speeds.

Then I thought (which my wife says is dangerous most of the time), if that's good, a bigger external antenna must be BETTER. So I unscrewed the small antenna from the Hawking Adapter and connected the larger Trendnet 8 db antenna. It is better & the signal reach is also amazing. My neighbor has a DSL modem setup with a wireless router. Our lots are square 5 acre lots to give you an idea of distance. No Problem of piggybacking onto that wireless router.

The external Trendnet antenna has a mounting system that can be permanently mounted, i.e., to the upper side of the coach. It is approximately 3/4's of an inch in diameter and about 2 feet long. That option would be to mount it high near the roof line so that the antenna would be higher than the roof line. It would also require yet another hole in the coach for for that reason I am opting out of that configuration. The antenna mount also can be "Pole Mounted" via two "U" bolts, and then the options can be as simple as a collapseable pole 12 feet long/high, or a pole in a tripod ala external satellite antenna setup which I also have. I am favoring that approach. Now the only problem will be getting the Trendnet cable inside of the coach with out going through a window, or drilling another hole. I can run the cable into the basement via the cable TV/Communication access port. Does anyone have an idea how I could run the cable from the basement up into the coach living room preferrably the passenger side???

The next time we are on the road, I'll report on the quality & Speed of WiFi receptions. The total cost of the 3 items was just under $80 at Frey's because

they had a sale on the Hawking adapter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BillAdams

Remember that the 11MB connection simply means that you were connected to a "B" router which is capped at 11MB and when you connected on your new device it showed a 54MB connection (G or N). This has absolutely nothing at all to do with the speed at which you are connected to the internet or the speed that can be provided by your internet connection. The "speed" you are seeing is the routers maximum capability. The only time you would see this kind of a transfer speed would be if you had 2 computers connected to this router and you were transferring files from one computer to another.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The only time you would see this kind of a transfer speed would be if you had 2 computers connected to this router and you were transferring files from one computer to another." That is true if you have a Ethernet connection to both PC's. It will never be true with any WiFi connection of the B, G, or N wireless protocol. It is due to protocol management data that takes a large chunk of bandwidth, leaving less for "user data".

Many factors affect actual user throughput speed. One critical parameter is the number of "data resends". This varies with numerous equipment and environmental factors. Regardless of what the wireless icons tell you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've installed a Wilson setup and it's doing a fine job so far. A no signal situation is boosted up by 1 to 2 bars. Those signals then get the cell phones and Internet service up and running. I'm in a no bar area in the summer so I leave the system up and running in the coach all the time. That way I have my cell phone and INTERNET coverage in the house. I'm using a Verizon MiFi card @ about $50.00 a month unlimited usage, no roaming charges. It also serves as a router for my wireless printer. I can use up to 4 or 5 computers or wireless devices at the same time. The Wilson system consists of their SoHo amp, their trucker antenna , and their indoor wall mount panel antenna. I have the outside trucker antenna mounted on my rear coach ladder. I have the antenna height set just above my air conditioners height. The idea of using an extension pole for the outside antenna seems like a good idea to me. I'll probably use that idea so I can raise my outdoor antenna higher when I'm stationary. Next is the SoHo amplifier which receives any signal from the trucker antenna and then boosts it up to a clean usable signal. Next is a wall mount inside antenna which receives the boosted signal from the SoHo and broadcasts those signals to my WiFi card, or our cell phones. So it goes like this. Outside antenna receives cell tower signals, amplifier boosts those received signals to the inside antenna which in turn sends the signals to the MiFi card or our cell phones. You're your own wifi hot spot which your friends can also use. That's as long as you give them the needed access code, as it's a secured signal. I've set up the system for 12v while traveling, and 120v for stationary use while on shore or genset power. It's a plus having the cell phone signals while traveling, hence the 12v system for the boost in fringe areas. 2 months of the year we're in New Mexico outside of Carlsbad up in the mountains @3500' in Lincoln National Forest. It's a verrry fringe area for cell phones or any Internet service. It's a maybe yes or maybe no area. You have to have a walk-a-bout to find an area to use your cell phones. That's if you can find an area that particular day. Forget it if it's a cloudy or an overcast day. Also if you happen to find a signal area that's not saying you won't drop the signal 1/2 way into a conversation. This year the new system will tell the tale. Was the system worth the money, does it really work as good as I'm hoping? So far since I've installed the system I've had no communication problems. Either cell phone or Internet. In March when we're in the mountains I'll be better informed as to how good the system really works. The cost of the system after extensive research, and finding the right parts, from the right supplier, at the right price, ended up to be around $450.00. Like I said so far it's been worth every penny. Up in the mountains in New Mexico will be the biggest and final test. My fingers are crossed, but I know it'll work fine. I hope.

Safe Travels,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Johnfv2 a question?

How did you mount your amps, antennas and route the cables. I bought the same package as you and intend to mount the Trucker antenna on the rear ladder of my 40 ft Phaeton. I would like to have everything permanently mounted without running exposed cables from the amp to the secondary antenna, which is a bit of a challenge since you need to maintain the minimum 20 ft distance between the two antennas.

I would prefer not to drill unnecessary holes through the roof but see no internal option that isn't unsightly. Has anyone had success with using adhesives to secure the cables on the roof? any ideas?

thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's not confuse the 2 wireless technologies here.

All wireless data uses Radio Frequencies. Just like any other radio, more power and a better antenna will give you better connectivity. Remember, it is a 2-way radio connection. Transmit *and* Receive.

Public WiFi like you find in RV parks and McDonalds, etc. is set up to provide shared Internet access. It is "hot-spot" technology and uses 2.4 GHz radio frequencies. The signal does not generally go farther than 300 feet and is very susceptible to degradation from metal objects and moisture.

WiFi adapters built in to computers are not very powerful. There are no "boosters" for the built in adapters. There are, however, higher powered replacement adapters that will increase the effective distance. These are typically connected via USB and you should turn off the internal adapter when using them.

Another, even better (for distance) solution is a WiFi bridge. That is what Brett is using. A bridge takes the WiFi signal and changes it to a wired network signal that can be connected directly to a computer or an internal access point, effectively creating another local hotspot.

Cellular data uses different frequencies than WiFi. The antennas are not compatible. There are many amplifiers and antenna solutions for cellular communications. They extend the distance from the cell tower to your devices, both voice and data.

We have a tremendous amount of free information on our websites. Links from Geeks On Tour.

We will also be presenting our computer seminars at RV rallies in Louisville, Redmond FMCA, Elkhart, and Goshen this summer.

Jim and Chris Guld

www.geeksontour.com

Will ya'll be in Madison this August?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest BillAdams

Yes, they will.

8.The Rally, Redmond, OR, 7/14/11

9.FMCA Convention, Madison, WI, 8/10-13/11

10.Escapade, Gillette, WY 8/28-9/2/11

11.Gypsy Journal Gathering, Celina Ohio 9/26-30/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I get back if enough are interested I will put together a set of instructions and add the part numbers and where to purchase all the items!

thanks, add me to your list as well

Jimmy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a Yagi USB directional antenna, mounted on our Winegard TV antenna, to facilitate directional tuning from inside our rig. I have received unsecured/open signal for as far away as 4 miles(clear line of sight) so far! The USB cable is run through the rig and plugs directly into a (1) computer USB slot. When the Yagi is plugged in to "Windows 7" computer, both internal and external connections are available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.wavewifi....rogue-wave.html

Installed antenna on extendable pole to clear top of motorhome. Ran ethernet cable to pole/antenna can be left attached for storage in the basement and then "erected" in less than 2 minutes.

Brett

I was thinking more in the line of the antenna attached to your Motor Home.

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...