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fredkeen@ymail.com

Do I Need A Spare Tire?

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OK. 19.5 or smaller, maybe. 22.5 no way! Pre-steel belted radials, yes. :(

This is 2016 not 1980 and with the Internet a tire is within 50 miles away. My coach can't stray to far off the beaten path! :) That's what

a jeep is for... :wub:

Carl

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I went round and round with this thought when we bought this coach in 2014. I looked all over the unit for a place to hide a wheel and tire assembly and finally came to the reality I was going to sign up for roadside assistance. I have all of the tools on board, jack and calibrated torque wrench but somewhere in the last year and a half I lost the ambition to change a flat tire. :rolleyes:

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Brett, I did not see anything about what size tire and only that it will swing R/L. Nothing about swinging down. How much does a mounted

22.5 weigh?

Carl

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You do not "need" to carry a spare. I had a blow out, took four and a half hours to find a tire my size...295/80R22.5... even though we were about 60 miles from Chicago. This size is mostly for MHs, thus not many around. When it comes time to change my current tires (315s on the front and 295s on the rear), I'll check space, and may keep the best of the 295s.

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FIVE. That should be in 2020 or 21'! By then, perhaps they will have the baffle tire for us citizens, that never go flat !

Currently used on military/government vehicles !

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Maybe so, Carl. However, if we have to pay what the gubmint pays for stuff we'll have to decide whether to get a new set of tires or just get a new MH. :D

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Roadmaster has a spare tire holder that hooks into your hitch mount. It holds rim sizes up to 24". It also has a second sleeve to slide the towbar. Its a little pricey but it resolves the storage and spare tire problem.

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Herman, my tires are set up the same as FIVE. Why? Good Question, we have a new 17' Newell here and it has 385 front, 315 drive and 385 tag!

He has no clue either! Does that mean that FIVE and I should have 315 on tag also? Tire Man might know!

Newell is 63,000#.

Carl

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While tires on an axle need to be the same (size, make and model preferably) there is no problem with different axles having different size tires.

Many have gone from 295 to 315 front tires for both more reserve capacity (not loaded to 100%) AND for better ride (carry same weight at lower PSI). But one has to verify that the larger tire will fit (not contact suspension or body parts at full cut angles as well as straight ahead).

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Five,

Just curious, why do you have 315s on the front and 295s on the rear?

Herman

That's what American Coach put on it. FYI, the axles GW are front to rear...17, 20, and 12k. The front carries the most weight and runs the highest TP. Re Brett's comment about wheel clearance...this coach (an AC Eagle) has a 60 degree 'steering angle' (the wording is from AC).

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I have built a carrier underneath the frame which uses an electric winch to lift the spare wheel off the ground. My tire size is 235/80/R22.5

I would like to more about the tire rack and hoist you built under your unit! Post some pics, tell us about it!

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I carry a spare. Most rv'rs change their mind after having a flat in the middle of nowhere, waiting for road service, then buying a replacement tire for $750 that doesn't really match their existing tires, so when they return to their home port, they buy a new tire to match the others! (PS.This is a fabricated story, but something to think about!)

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I carry a spare. Most rv'rs change their mind after having a flat in the middle of nowhere, waiting for road service, then buying a replacement tire for $750 that doesn't really match their existing tires, so when they return to their home port, they buy a new tire to match the others! (PS.This is a fabricated story, but something to think about!)

When I had my blowout, as stated above, it took many hours to find a 295/80R22.5....and it wasn't $750...it was $800! :(

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People talk about age when it comes to tire issues. In my experience Age has little to do with it. Bought new tires for one of my Suburbans, next day, catastrophic failure. no evidence of a curb hit or other. On my last MH  about 12k miles right front tire blew out. 1" diameter hole in the sidewall. no other signs of damage. My current plan is to get a carrier and a spare, mounted. I will get the correct sockets, I already have a 42" breaker bar. I am wondering if the onboard air will run a decent air impact wrench. That would speed things up! I can use the jacks to lift the coach. I do carry a scissors jack to support the breaker bar to allow me to get maximum leverage.

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4 hours ago, jimnorman said:

...People talk about age when it comes to tire issues. In my experience Age has little to do with it...

jimnorman, I think you'll find age is the biggest player when it comes to RV tires needing to be placed.  Your experience might be different, but most of us never run the tread off our tires, but they age out to the point of being unserviceable to the point of being dangerous.

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On March 17, 2016 at 10:03 PM, rlbarkleyii said:

I would like to more about the tire rack and hoist you built under your unit! Post some pics, tell us about it!

I will be at the Chandler FMCA convention in March so if you are coming out I would be happy to show you.

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I think I misspoken a bit. Age certainly has an effect on a tire and they do age out. What I was pointing out was simply that your tires can be brand new and still fail. Road Hazards or simply a bad tire. Just because your tires are not  'Old' does not mean you are exempt from issues. Few of us will wear out our tires before they get to an age where catastrophic failure is likely just driving.

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On December 18, 2016 at 0:59 PM, jimnorman said:

People talk about age when it comes to tire issues. In my experience Age has little to do with it. Bought new tires for one of my Suburbans, next day, catastrophic failure. no evidence of a curb hit or other. On my last MH  about 12k miles right front tire blew out. 1" diameter hole in the sidewall. no other signs of damage. My current plan is to get a carrier and a spare, mounted. I will get the correct sockets, I already have a 42" breaker bar. I am wondering if the onboard air will run a decent air impact wrench. That would speed things up! I can use the jacks to lift the coach. I do carry a scissors jack to support the breaker bar to allow me to get maximum leverage.

I have used on board air to power my 3/4 inch impact wrench to change a spare which I carry.  I have been doing this for the last 17 years on my current coach and am currently changing to a new to me coach that is in the paint shop as we speak.  I use the leveling jacks to lift the coach to change tires and do carry the proper tools to change a tire on the wheel.

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Ok, so maybe I have a different philosophy.

I returned this summer from a 12,000 mile trip to Alaska and back.  No spare tire carried.  I went down every bad road not recommended for RVs I could find, such as the road to McCarthy.  I was lucky, no flats.

However, this was a strategic decision.  I don't really have a good spot to carry a spare and wasn't willing to take up the entire back of my Jeep to carry one.  But its not just a spare tire.  So many other things can go wrong, from tires to alternators, fuel pumps, injectors, brakes, etc.  I talked to one guy last year who spent over a week waiting for replacement shock absorber.    The bottom line is that a tire is just one of many things that can go wrong on a trip.   I carry spare belts and filters, plus a full tool box and lots of small motorhome repair stuff, but none of that takes much space or dollars.   

The bottom line is that you have to simply be willing to have patience if you encounter problems on the road.  I was resigned to the fact that a major breakdown could cost me two weeks on the way to or from Alaska.  I was resigned to the fact that any one of a number of possible repairs could cost big bucks to fix.  

So, a spare tire, more than anything, is really nothing more than a bet on your time and convenience.  It is a limited bet, since it happens rarely, is expensive to cover, and the odds are you won't need it.   Personally, I would first spend money on a good tire monitoring system.  That might save you the actual loss of a tire, as mine did when I had a leaking schrader valve.  I caught it early, re-inflated using my pressure tanks (consider adding an air hose outlet and a good air hose), and drove it to the nearest tire shop, which put in the new valve for free.  If you catch a flat early, before it goes fully flat, a patch may be all you need.  

All that being said, if I had a convenient way to carry one, I would probably do it.

 

Charlie

2005 Coachmen Sportscoach 380DS Diesel Pusher

2014 Jeep Rubicon Unlimited

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My front tires are 315/R80 22.5's.  Rears are 295/R80 22.5.  Really don't want to use valuable cargo space to carry a spare, much less 2.  Rely on Pressure Pro and Coachnet to get me through the day.  Worst case is I sit in the coach and have a beer while I await the truck.

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12 hours ago, CarlAda said:

My front tires are 315/R80 22.5's.  Rears are 295/R80 22.5.  Really don't want to use valuable cargo space to carry a spare, much less 2.  Rely on Pressure Pro and Coachnet to get me through the day.  Worst case is I sit in the coach and have a beer while I await the truck.

On my new to me coach I used the area under the propane tank to hang the spare.  Didn't use any storage compartment space.

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