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Air Compressor - Best Type/Size for Motorhome Tires

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Well I went back to Walmart and opened that Slime Pump. It does not have standard 1/4" fittings on the air hose. They are smaller at both ends, and the business end is a screw on tire chock and is not removable from the hose. So I guess I need to keep looking for one to take along in the RV. Too bad, I really wanted to get this one. Good price, compact, nice carry bag, but I really wanted to be able to snap connect in the air dryer when using it on the RV tires. On the road, other uses, such as bikes, cars I probably would not use the air dryer.

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I would use a dryer in the air line if I was using one of the aftermarket compressors. I use my onboard air which has a dryer and cuts off a 132 lbs. I use it for air wrenches and for airing up tires when I change them on the wheels.

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Well I went back to Walmart and opened that Slime Pump. It does not have standard 1/4" fittings on the air hose. They are smaller at both ends, and the business end is a screw on tire chock and is not removable from the hose. So I guess I need to keep looking for one to take along in the RV. Too bad, I really wanted to get this one. Good price, compact, nice carry bag, but I really wanted to be able to snap connect in the air dryer when using it on the RV tires. On the road, other uses, such as bikes, cars I probably would not use the air dryer.

Not sure of the type hose, but if you really liked it and it will do what you want, you may be able to cut the end off and get a 1/4" npt - hose barb fitting and 1 or 2 hose clamps and be in business. In lieu of clamps you could find someone to crimp the fitting on the hose.

I'd use the dryer on any tire or anything where the compressed air is in contact with a metal rim or tire rubber. The moisture is damaging to tire rubber, metal rims, etc.

BH

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Quick question on tire gauges. I got a really nice digital one by Husky, seems to be very accurate. But due to the wheel cover on my front, and the position of the valve stem on my outer rears, (stem is on the inside), I cannot use this for any of my RV tires, except the inner dualie. I will need one that the tip goes at an angle, between 90 and 45 degrees. The old standard gauge where the center part pops out when you put it on comes to mind. I know to avoid the "cheap" ones of those, but what do you all think of a good quality one of those? Or do you recommend something else?

I was always leery of how accurate any of that type are, seems to much variation is possible in how much pressure it will take to make the center piece move a given distance, (if it's dirty, has some kind of film that either aids or impedes it's ability to slide), would cause different readings.

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John,

You need a "dual foot tire gauge". Google that and you will fine quite a few over a reasonably wide range of prices and likely, quality.

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Thanks. I looked these up and it seems the dual foot refers to the schrader head being both ways (or two-sided).

What are your feelings regarding the type of read mechanism, there basically seem to be 3.

1. Center metal or plastic rod pops out a given distance.

2. Mechanical dial read out

3. Digital read out.

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Thanks. I looked these up and it seems the dual foot refers to the schrader head being both ways (or two-sided).

What are your feelings regarding the type of read mechanism, there basically seem to be 3.

1. Center metal or plastic rod pops out a given distance.

2. Mechanical dial read out

3. Digital read out.

QGJ,

I have used all three. Mostly a matter of preference. The more you spend the more accurate (maybe) and smaller psi increments. Its hard to beat a good ol' service gauge (type with brass rod that slides out and stays), but they usually have 2 lb increments. A big digital readout is nice and some dials are easy to read too. I have a digital and a service gauge and for some reason, I usually grab the service gauge. Call me old fashioned I reckon.

BH

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Not sure of the type hose, but if you really liked it and it will do what you want, you may be able to cut the end off and get a 1/4" npt - hose barb fitting and 1 or 2 hose clamps and be in business. In lieu of clamps you could find someone to crimp the fitting on the hose.

I'd use the dryer on any tire or anything where the compressed air is in contact with a metal rim or tire rubber. The moisture is damaging to tire rubber, metal rims, etc.

BH

I actually did this. I bought this Slime brand pump, checked the hose carefully and then bought a 1/4" barb with 1/4" npt fitting on it. I cut off their end, pushed the barb fitting on and clamped it. Then connected one side of the quick connect. Now I can plug in either the standard tire chuck or put the air dryer on first, then the tire chuck. I think it will work out nicely.

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I agree with most posts on this subject except that the real problem is getting 120psi into tires that need it. My motorhome is weighed and the MFG put on low profile tires with a 16 Ply Rating that requires 120 psi in order to carry the load properly. I have never been to a Pilot/Flying J that can install more than 100 psi. My Camping World only has a compressor that will install 100psi.

Love's truck stops usually have a service area that can install 120psi in your tires. My coach, when tires are warm and properly inflated, show 126psi to 127 psi. If tires are warm, you have to know this. A cold inflation of 120psi will show more when tires get warm.

If for some reason you cannot find air and you know your tires are a few pounds under the required psi, then drive slower and stop a little more often to get out of the coach, walk around and with the back of your hand, feel the sidewalls of the tires. If one is overheated enough to cause a problem, you will probably be able to feel the "Hot" tire. The others may be very warm, but not as hot as another. Doing this can possibly get you to an exit soon so you can properly fill the tires to recommended inflation pressures.

Filling a truck tire to 120psi from 0 would take quite a while with a low pressure (and low CFM) (Cubic Feet per Minute) compressor. But to fill a low tire from 112 psi to 120 or 122psi should not take that long with an air compressor that operates at a maximum of 150 to 165psi, with a rating of 5.0CFM @90 psi.

You will need much more CFM if you fill your tires completely from 0psi a lot. If you have a shop and do this very often, you would want more like 175psi to 200psi working pressure and at least 10CFM.

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Did a post on my blog specifically on Air Compressors. Bottom Line is that with a little planning even full timer may be able to avoid needing to buy and carry a compressor.

Previously offered a suggestion on how to "Top Off" your inflation when you have to drive a couple miles to get to a HD compressor.

RE Pressure Gauge Accuracy. Have a new blog post that will go "Live" later this week with specific suggestions on gauges. Also am planning a post on weight & tire inflation and the difference between "measurable" and "meaningful" when it comes to tire loads & inflation.

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I have read at least 100 posts over the various forum regarding AC/AP. The current MH I have had for 3 years and the rear tires have never lost air and the front ones I added 10 lbs when I got it and are about the same.So am I lucky? I think these people that check AP every day actually are the cause of their own low AP to some degree/?. I check mine twice-3 times a year

I bought a battery boost/160AC combo from Costco and it will add 2-3 lbs in a reasonable time.its $70.00

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For those without a TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System) which I HIGHLY recommend, I would sure not suggest that checking tire pressure 2-3 times a year is adequate.

The major cause of blowouts, particularly in duals is running low on pressure. And on a dual, it is very difficult to "eye ball" a low tire.

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To each their own. I take a walk around + temp feel when I stop for a P break etc. l know how they look at ride height etc

22.5 x295 tires don't lose air or go flat very often. I have done it this way for 10+ years and never had a problem.

I also don't put many miles on per year. I sit in one spot for months on end. I agree TPMS is a great system just something

I am not that interested in.

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In controlled testing of Professional drivers the best they can do is spot a tire that is only 20 psi low. You have been lucky. Too often people think that because they checked their tires 50 miles or 2 days or a week earlier it is impossible to get a flat due to cut, puncture or leaking valve.

This person insisted that they had used a gauge 50 miles earlier.2z73mn6.jpg

But here I proved they had suffered an air leak.

In reality you can't tell the low inflation that is doing damage to the tire structure even when presented with the artificial comparison never available in real life.

If you think you have a calibrated eyeball what do you think the pressure is on this tire?

69f4tk.jpg

and how much air here

11l1w1y.jpg

Don't forget a loss of 20% is considered Flat for warranty purposes.

Looking forward to the answers. Will check in a few days.

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I would need a picture of the tire as it sits flat on the ground,not gravel, type of vehicle, load structure on rear tires etc but a guess on what I see strictly based on what the poor picture shows us I say its partially flat for sure

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I would need a picture of the tire as it sits flat on the ground,not gravel, type of vehicle, load structure on rear tires etc but a guess on what I see strictly based on what the poor picture shows us I say its partially flat for sure

In real life you are not presented with two pictures of the same tire on the same piece of ground. I will give you that on gravel might make it more difficult but some claim to remember what a properly inflated tire "looks" like when they do a simple visual inspection during a P break. I noted you did not identify which view had less air and if the tire was more than 20% low.

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I have never ever had a problem looking,pounding and feeling my DPMH tires.I never said a monitor system was not a good idea. It is because most people can not identify tire problems the way I can.

I actually missed where you were asking about the two pictures and ap difference. I doubt anyone could tell you the exact AP difference in the tires as I don't know what the starting pressure was to begin with and its in gravel. Perhaps put the proper AP in ,take picture, then take these two and it might be easier-- also do it on pavement.

When I use my expertise to determine how my tires are I have to know the history of them. So I naturally set the air pressures and take a good look at things on flat ground loaded and go from there.

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