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For myself I must report the the greatest ever was when I dropped having a regular Internet connection and began to use the Verizon Wireless Key. It seems to work almost everywhere I go as they have a lot of towers. I have used it in Oregon in very tree-laden parks as well as on the beach and have had no trouble! Have also used it in Utah, Wyoming and Texas with good results. I like it so much that I use it on my home computer and on my laptop both.

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By Wireless Key, I assume you are refering to a USB Cellular Data device.

In our FMCA Internet seminar, we always ask the audience what they are using and how they like it. Verizon gets the best response, but AT&T is coming on strong. It really depends on how and where you travel.

The best one is the one that works for you.

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Does anyone have experience with either Verizon or AT&T wireless broadband in Mexico and Canada? Mexico particularly.

Thanks,

Dianne Wolfe

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We are seriously considering dropping our home Time-Warner in favor of the Verizon USB device. We've used it now for about a month, and with one exception (a park in LA where it worked, but snail slowly) it has been as fast or faster than our home hard wire hook-up w/router.

I've used it from home in SC to NY and all along the route in tree covered parks or rest areas to open air, no obstruction. Wherever our Verizon cell phones work, so does tha USB. I also enjoy that fact that it is secure, and I can do everything with it that I do on at home. The only drawback is having to buy a new router for home use, as we each use a lap top, and in the MH we only take one. The campground wireless often costs on a daily basis and is not secure, or is quite slow or located in the office only.

I also find the cost for the device very close to what we have to pay for Time-Warner.

Doc Mike

Itasca Spirit

Honda CR-V

Roadmaster Falcon2 and M&G Brake system

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We use the Verizon USB device with very good results in most locations. It is easy to determine your availability of service if you have a Verizon cell phone - no cell service=no Internet service. It has only happened twice in our east coast travels.

Wayne

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We also use Verizon but have a router so that we can both be online at the same time. It works very well and when our son and his family travel with us, we work all five laptops off of the system. We have only encountered a couple places that it does work but they are very few and far between. We live full time and during the summer months we are on the raod a lot - winters we have DSL with the express card as a back up.....works well.

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I just switched to Verizon wireless phone and spent the next two weeks at a campground with no service. I couldn't get service at my daughter's home, either. In a final insult, when I could get service there I couldn't pick up my voice mail. This was in California, not Alaska! So, yes, it does depend on where you travel. We've been using AT&T for Louise's cell phone, Sprint for mine and T-Mobile for Internet with the theory that we should surely have one of the three working so we could communicate with family. T-Mobile works well for us for cellular, their service isn't the fastest but we find few places were we can't get service. Sprint was not very good for cell service, the vote is still out on Verizon...

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We have Verizon cell phones and a Verizon air card. Only 2 places where we couldn't get service. Hot Springs, AR and way out in the boonies in AZ. Last time we went back to Hot Springs, their tower must have been upgraded because it worked fine that time. If none of the cellular companies invest in a tower, no cell service will work. There is one place in FL (Salt Springs) that there is no tower nearby and you have to drive to get service. Hope someone puts up a tower because we love it there! I have been coast-to-coast with my Verizon air card and most of the time I can get to the Internet. It is sometimes slow, but then I just wait until we move and it improves. Overall, we're very happy with it. :rolleyes:

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We just completed a 7,300 mile trip through the West from Arkansas. We used our tethered Verizon phone nearly everywhere. There were only two spots that had no service - Challis, ID (where no one in the campground had a signal from the local tower), and Lone Fir NFS campground in the heart of a valley deep in the Cascade Mountains. We have a Wilson external antenna and amplifier with hook-and-loop connection that is sometimes required in remote areas but would not work in those two settings. We tether to a Cradlepoint CTR-350 router that works great. Since returning home, we have continued to use this setup, saving quite a bit over our former ISP.

Doug Smith

F409618

'00 Southwind 34N

'08 Suzuki GV

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By Wireless Key, I assume you are refering to a USB Cellular Data device.

In our FMCA Internet seminar, we always ask the audience what they are using and how they like it. Verizon gets the best response, but AT&T is coming on strong. It really depends on how and where you travel.

The best one is the one that works for you.

Hoping not to re-state the obvious, something a lot of folks don't realize is that the USB or PCMCIA style Air Cards/Cellular Data Device/Wireless Key usually have (if you look really close) a tiny rubber cap over an external antenna connection. Most larger cell stores either have in stock, or can order the 6" high, magnetic base antenna with a 6' long cable, and the adapter "dongle" to go with it. On top of a vehicle, or just in a higher place in the RV, these devices will significantly improve signal strength and overall performance. The whole package is usually under $40.

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Guest Wayne77590

just curious. Using my AT&T USB 881 I am limited to 5 Gb a month and then I start getting charged by the minute. I have never used, and probably will not, 5 Gb. I had thought that at times I would like to stream so TV programs that we have missed. That would start using up the bandwidth significantly.

Has any one used 5 Gb in a month?

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just curious. Using my AT&T USB 881 I am limited to 5 Gb a month and then I start getting charged by the minute. I have never used, and probably will not, 5 Gb. I had thought that at times I would like to stream so TV programs that we have missed. That would start using up the bandwidth significantly.

Has any one used 5 Gb in a month?

Yes, indeed. My wife & I share a VZW data card via Internet Connection Sharing (ad hoc wireless). I have been on VZW data plan for over 5 years. Luckily I have a grandfathered plan so I do not have that 5 GB data limit. But if I go over that 5 GB amount, VZW can "throttle down" my connection speed. For that reason, I keep our usage just under 5 GB a month. So in answer to your inquiry, YES, it is quite easy to reach the 5 GB threshold (and we do not try to watch TV or stream videos). Just surfing and researching.

The data plans now with the 5 GB limit charge you much $$ if you go over that amount. Watch your data usage carefully. You can check your data usage in the VZ Access Manger by clicking on USAGE. This figure is expressed in KB. To convert to GB, go to: Convert KB to GB website

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I also have a Blackberry Verizon smart phone that I tether to a laptop. Works very well. Most plans limit you to 5 GB per month with a heafty per minute rate for overages. Most people will be fine but you want to be careful if you allow your computer to automatically update itself. Alot of software installed in computers will check for updates besides the operating system. Just monitor your usage.

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I might suggest looking at the new MI-FI wireless systems. For portablility in moving it around to find good signals, the ability to connect up to 5 computers on the wireless network, and the elimination of a seperate wireless router, it beats plug-in USB devices hands down. I've been using the Verizon 2200 for a couple months, both at home and on the road. The service fee is the same as with a USB device. Verizon was running a special when I bought my device for $25. ATT also has a MI-FI device.

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We also use Verizon but have a router so that we can both be online at the same time. It works very well and when our son and his family travel with us, we work all five laptops off of the system. We have only encountered a couple places that it does work but they are very few and far between. We live full time and during the summer months we are on the raod a lot - winters we have DSL with the express card as a back up.....works well.

I have the Verizon wireless device as well and have used it successfully for several years, but just on one computer at a time. How do I use it with the router? Do I just connect it to the router rather than the laptop? (I have wi-fi'd us at the house, but not yet in the rig)

I'm visiting friends right now, so I can't just step outside to try it...

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I have the Verizon wireless device as well and have used it successfully for several years, but just on one computer at a time. How do I use it with the router? Do I just connect it to the router rather than the laptop? (I have wi-fi'd us at the house, but not yet in the rig)

I'm visiting friends right now, so I can't just step outside to try it...

A special router designed to work with the USB modem is required. A popular one is made by Cradlepoint. I would call the 3Gstore and get their advice.

Also if you are due for a "New every two" replacement you can now get a device called a MIFI which is a USB modem that will also act as a router and allow up to five devices to connect wirelessly to the internet.

It will lower your monthly bill to $50 and allow you to get 1X,3G and 4G where available. The disadvantage is that if you are gradfathered with an unlimited data plan you will lose that and have a 5GB per month limit. The good news is that each additional GB (or fraction thereof) will only cost you $10 extra.

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I picked up the Verizon Wireless MiFi in Perry GA after attending the "Geeks On Tour" presentation and have never looked back. We are now Full-timers and so far the only thing negative I can say is that sometimes it's a little slow on video feed in some areas, but it always performs (so far...) I work while we are traveling, so it is really important to be able to get a signal. Previously I never had a good word for Verizon, but I have changed my tune. I LOVE my MiFi.

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I have been using the Verizon usb for about 4 years and have no problem. I just got the 4G card and not everywhere can I get 4G. However, it will pick up 3G when 4G isn't available. I also have Verizon cell and have dropped the land line. Just purchased a device called X-link bluetooth cellular gateway. With this device I plug in my house land line phones and have my cell phone within 10 feet of this device and I get all my in coming and out going calls on my house phones. Two regular phones (kitchen & bedroom) and two wireless phones (family room & garage). Now I no longer have to find the cell phone, I just pick up any regular phone.

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Every public hotspot is different in my experience. Tengo has been very good and sometimes unusable.

When you connect to a public hotspot, you are not connecting directly to the Internet. You are connecting to an access point that is in turn connected to an Internet modem.

Many factors affect your experience. Your proximity and orientation to the access point is important. The bandwidth backhaul (connection to the Internet) and loading (how many people are accessing) are the things you have no control over.

The main advantage to using a public hotspot is no bandwidth limits. Great for getting those large system updates, etc.

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RE : Tengo Internet :

I have been RV ing for about 10 years .

After spending two weeks at Woodland Lakes in Texas .... and the poor internet connection and service.

The only time I have internet trouble is when the park has hired Tengo Internet to manage the wifi and make the park a little more money. I don't mind paying for internet service .... but when you pay and the service is so bad it is not usable.

I am now to the point that if I arrive at an RV park and they tell me they have Tengointernet ...

I will get back in my RV and drive on down the road to the next RV park.

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Just purchased a device called X-link bluetooth cellular gateway. With this device I plug in my house land line phones and have my cell phone within 10 feet of this device and I get all my in coming and out going calls on my house phones. Two regular phones (kitchen & bedroom) and two wireless phones (family room & garage). Now I no longer have to find the cell phone, I just pick up any regular phone.

jhalat, Welcome to the Forum. Do you think this unit would work in you M/H?

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