Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
mema12

CB Radio

Recommended Posts

Guest Wayne77590

I purchased the Cobra 75 as it had all the features, and the main unit is out of the way and just the hand set is needed to hear, change channels, talk, etc. I just figured it was the lessor of two evils. Now I just have to install it. In the meantime, I use a hand-held.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest 2driftrs

We've had about every brand on the market, but favor Midland and Cobra. It's not as much the brand but features. One of the features you have to have is noise limiting and/or noise blanking. This is nothing more than special filters built into the radio to suppress ignition noise in gas rigs but also alternator noise in all rigs. If you're going to use the radio often, consider mike gain and rf gain. Mike gain lets you boost your transmitted signal modulation (NOT power) while RF gain lets you attenuate your received signal.

We never really liked the Cobra all-in-one we had because the speaker quality left much to be desired. We currently have a Uniden PRO510 in the toad and a Cobra 29LTD in the coach. The Cobra unit is pushing 20 years old, so I guess you could say we got our monies worth. I like the Uniden because of its small size. The Uniden web site has refurb units available for many models if you don't want to invest a bundle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd say it depends on what you are going to use it for. If it's mainly listening, then go cheap and small. There are much better radio communication systems available. FERS, GMRS, and Ham to name three.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JMHO, but you will probably do more listening than talking. The trucker's like to talk to each other or someone than is really LOUD on the CB.

Most any Radio today will do you a good job, the main ingrediant is the ANTENNA. Get you a 3 or 4 foot FIRESTIK ( depending where you mount it)

and make sure it ia a NGP (no ground plane) one. They also sell a nice side mount that leaves no wires showing when installed, MODEL M-2. This

will give you a durable and neat installation, and most of all you can increase the performance of your radio. Good Luck,

David G.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest 2driftrs

We mounted our CB antenna on the ladder to keep it as far away from the FM and Cell antennas as possible. In order to keep signal loss and outside interference to a minimum, we ran RG-8 cable to the radio instead of the usual RG-59. Be absolutely sure spring loaded mounts are used unless you never venture off the freeways or drive on tree lined roads.

We use the CB to talk to truckers and other RV'ers quite often, so it's usually left turned on. But I know folks who just want to communicate with the significant other during parking maneuvers. In that case, those inexpensive walkie-talkie's (FERS) will work just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No preference on a particular brand but recommend a CB as a definite asset in an RV. When traveling in city traffic or when in traffic jams, they can save you huge amounts of time. We've had incidents where just listening to truckers saves us many minutes if not hours waiting in a traffic jam. We seldom talk but often listen. One of our early incidents alerted us to a sudden stop coming around a curve. We slowed and were able to stop in time whereas without the radio we'd likely have shifted our entire contents to try to prevent a rear-ender. Also useful when traveling in caravan. If you are a serious RV'er, you should have a CB as well as the above mentioned FERS and/or GMRS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CB's with built in weather band stations make it convenient to check ahead when driving

and check on what's coming when parked so you can secure the awning or other equipment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Doc Mike,

Channel 19 is where the truck drivers are. If you get a CB with the weather info, you'll need to scan the weather channels to see which one is broadcasting in the area you are in. Channel 13 has been the RV channel for 30+ years. I do not hear RV'ers on this channel except at Rallies.

The radio you choose is you're personal preference. The technology is a commodity and all are about the same. Focus on where you'll mount the radio. Then look for one with the features and size that fits your needs. I have the Cobra all in one radio. I purchased an external speaker and plugged a headset into the speaker. I use the headset when using the CB. The headset covers one ear only. One must still be prepared to hear the wife, whenever she speaks. :rolleyes: Like previously posted, it is the antenna and antenna wire that make or break a CB installation. I have been using Firestik antenna systems with great success. Go to http://www.firestik.com/CatalogFrame.htm to see their products. Consider a no-ground plane antenna system. The antenna, mount and wire must be matched. Firestik sells kits. In an RV environment, it expands your choices as to where you can install the antenna. When it comes to CB radio, size matters. Consider a top loaded, no ground plane antenna and as long of an antenna as you are comfortable with. I have a class A coach and use a 4' antenna mounted on the driver's side above the driver's window. A minimum of 2/3 the antenna height should be above the coach roof line. With the setup mentioned here, I am very happy with the range of reception and transmission (several miles for each).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the good info. I'll start my search soon, or continue to do what I've done thus far....YELL a lot. Just kidding. The Ford cab on my Class C has ample room for the CB and I think I can mount the antenna on the ladder or the side of the overcab area on the drivers side while mounting the unit in the cabinet above my litte head adjacent to the CD/DVD player. Thats where the marshmallow is, Wayne.

We've been very luck this year to date, not being stuck in traffic as a result of accident or even too many vehicles for the road. Having lived and worked in areas where traffic creates its own personality I know how helpful a CB can be. The GPS is also an assist as it notifes me if there is a slow down ahead, and approximately how long. It can't however, if an accident or incident has just occured.

Be safe folks, and enjoy the wind at your back.

Doc Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...