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State Drivers Licence

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Welcome to the forum! Like your name!!! Texas requires a different class of license for over 26000 pounds but that does not apply to nonresident.

You should be good if you are legal in a Washington.

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Yes, all states recognize all other states valid driver's licenses. So, if you are legal in your home state, you are good anywhere.

Legal limits such as speed limits, weight limits, etc DO vary by state.

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Well this is confusing, because my wife called North Carolina DMV and ask about this when we moved up to a used 2006 Fleetwood Expedition and she was told by a NCDMV officer that yes it's on the books, but it is not enforced and that they are trying to get it removed. He specifically told her that we did not need anything more than a regular drivers license.

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2mahams welcome to the forum.

I think I would want something in writing stating that you do not need anything other than a regular drivers license. I have read of cases where insurance companies have denied coverage in accidents because the driver was not properly licensed.

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The only Class B licence is for commercial buses, That is what the NCDMV was telling us and if you look on the NCDMV web site it makes no reference to anything but comercial vehicles. We have a lot of freinds that have Class A and all have said the same thing, they called or looked online and and no information. Even our insurance co. said it was not needed?????? So I am still confused.

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2mahams,

Each state has their own regulations as to operators permits for driving vehicles in excess of 26,000 lbs. If you have checked with your state MVD and they state that you do not have to have anything other then a standard operators license and your insurance company agrees then you are in compliance for your state and all other state have a reciprocal agreement that makes your license good. In Texas there are 3 classes of operator license. (1) Class "C" allows you to operate any vehicle under 25,999 lbs. (2) Class "B" allows you to operate any vehicle over 26,000 lbs. and to tow up 9,999 lbs. (3) Class "A" allows you to operate any vehicle over 26,000 lbs. and to tow over 10.000 lbs. All three are non commercial license. Many states have no such requirements.

Therefore if you comply with your states requirements, you are good to GO.

Safe Travels,

Herman

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State laws can be confusing, that is the blessing (?) of living in the United STATES. In Washington State, to drive any size vehicle (non-commercial), you don't need any special license, EXCEPT if you want to drive a vehicle (van or bus) that is built to carry more than 15 passengers, you are required to have a CDL. That is a federal law. Yes, Virginia, if you buy a small bus (over 15 passengers) to carry your family around (like our daughter and son-in-law who just had number eleven), you have to have a CDL. Now the kicker is that each state sets their own rules concerning what it takes to get a CDL (class C with a P [passenger] endorsement for the bus). In Washington DC you just have to take a written test and a driving test with a vehicle of the class you want to get licensed for to get your CDL. In Washington State, you have to show that you have graduated from a 'Truck Driving School' or have 'X' number of hours of training by a holder of a Class A CDL, then take the written test and an extensive driving test. How stupid is that!!! Just because you want a vehicle large enough to carry your family and some stuff, you have to go through all that.

The one 'work-around' of that is that if you buy the bus, and convert it into an RV, then you don't need the CDL. All that takes is a bed, some cooking facilities and a bathroom facility. It doesn't even have to be 'self contained'. So that is what my daughter is looking in to if the not to distant future.

After all my experience on the road (3 million miles) I am part of the minority who feels that some kind of extra test should be required for someone, anyone, driving something over a certain GVW, like maybe 30 or 35 thousand pounds. My daughter could go down and buy a 45 foot, 60.000 pound motor home and haul a 20 foot trailer hauling 20000 pounds of stuff and not be required to have any more license than some one driving a Kia, but they can't pick up a 20 passenger bus to transport their family without going to school. How logical is that?

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The only Class B licence is for commercial buses, That is what the NCDMV was telling us and if you look on the NCDMV web site it makes no reference to anything but comercial vehicles. We have a lot of freinds that have Class A and all have said the same thing, they called or looked online and and no information. Even our insurance co. said it was not needed?????? So I am still confused.

2mahams,

You need to research this a little bit more. I live and am licensed in NC. The website clearly states that even though a CDL is not needed to operate a recreational vehicle, the operator must have the appropriate CLASS (my emphasis) license. If your RV is 26001 lbs or over, then you must have a Class B license. The usual license for operating autos/small trucks is a Class C.

Tim

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Again, in Texas, having just gone through this a week ago, as this is our first coach over 26,000 GVWR:

For your non-commercial (i.e. personal use only) use, you need a: CDL class B, exempt.

It requires a written and driving test. Only unusual part is parallel parking, but the spaces are generally long enough for an 18 wheeler, so shouldn't be a big issue. I practices using cardboard boxes in a parking lot for 15 minutes, and no problem with the test. Kind of funny, having the "learners permit" between written and driving test, even though I have over a quarter million diesel pusher miles, but them are the rules!

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2mahams,

You need to research this a little bit more. I live and am licensed in NC. The website clearly states that even though a CDL is not needed to operate a recreational vehicle, the operator must have the appropriate CLASS (my emphasis) license. If your RV is 26001 lbs or over, then you must have a Class B license. The usual license for operating autos/small trucks is a Class C.

Tim

We called and talked to a NCDMV officer and was told it was not needed and our insurance agent said the same thing.

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Reality-- many many who work in state DMV's do NOT, repeat NOT know of their own state's requirements concerning motorhome licensing.

Best to look at the requirements for yourself on your state's website vs banking an a clerk's assurance.

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For North Carolina, take a look at this website:

http://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/driver/license/

This is the North Carolina Department of Transportation website.

If you scroll down toward the bottom of the page, you will find several classes of license other than CDL (Class A, B, C) if you click on the (?) it will give a description of when the license is required. For example Class B is:

"Required to operate any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 26,001 pounds or more that is exempt from CDL requirements..."

With this statement on the website, I would not want to get stopped by police without the proper license or have an accident and insurance refuse coverage because you are not properly licensed.

Regardless of what a DMV employee or insurance agent says, it appears that a class A or B license is required for an RV in excess of 26,001 pounds.

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The federal requirements where just changed a few months ago. Vehicles over 2600 lbs you must meet federal license requirements. But states meet them in different ways. NY requires a regular drivers license with an RV endorsement.

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TimmersRL,

Welcome to the FMCA Forum.

Do you have a link to the new Federal requirements-- if so, please post.

Was not aware that driver's licenses were anything but state requirements-- in the state in which you are licensed, with reciprocity in all other states.

Thanks.

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Reality-- many many who work in state DMV's do NOT, repeat NOT know of their own state's requirements concerning motorhome licensing.

Best to look at the requirements for yourself on your state's website vs banking an a clerk's assurance.

Bingo! We were told several years ago by a local DMV office employee and a state employee in Austin that RV's were exempt and no special license was required. I kept hearing otherwise so I read the law and went to a local DMV driving test site to ask one of the people who gives the driving test and found out the truth. As others have indicated, Texas does require a Class B Exempt license for vehicles over 26,000 lbs. and a Class A Exempt for vehicles over 26,000 lbs. and towing over 10,000 lbs.

It is likely that a LEO is not going to cite you for the license issue but it is very likely an insurance company will find any excuse they can to not pay up, and if another party is involved in an accident with you, you are courtroom fodder for a personal injury lawyer who finds out you are improperly licensed. And, they will.

My test was in Kerrville, TX and was pretty simple. Mine did not involve parallel parking but she did take me to a large parking lot and asked me to back up 100 feet and then turn and back into one of the car parking spaces against an outside curb. Interesting. But, like a parallel parking test it was meant to demonstrate close quarter control I guess. Heck, after maneuvering around in several overly tight RV parks, this was a piece of chocolate cake.

Hint, be sure you have proof of insurance and be sure all of your exterior lights work including turn signals and brake lights. They check them all. And there was a short version of an air brake test with the passenger side front wheel chocked.

As Brett says above, don't trust the hearsay from seemingly knowledgeable people. Look it up yourself.

Don

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This whole license thing is a mess. It seems Texas is the worst. A problem that I and many others have run into, if you pull a trailer behind your class A and it has any writing on it like "race Team" Company Name", or anything that identifies the trailer as non-personal and you do not have commercial plates and CDL, you have a problem.

Also if you pull a trailer and travel to craft shows in Texas with a clean sided RV & trailer, but get stopped in Texas and the officer wants to see inside the trailer, you better have commercial plates on all and a CDL. Texas recently has been enforcing this regularly. They seem to be looking for larger trailers with tandem axles and ramp doors, venders at shows, ect. If you do crafts in your trailer, or sell out of same, make sure your plated and licensed correctly for their laws-- regardless what your state says. It is a expensive learning experience.

A friend of mine from Georgia got arrested for driving without a license (CDL) and un-registered vehicle, (was not commercial) for hauling a bass boat behind his personal class A that had sponsorship decals all over it. He is a professional fishing guide, been hauling his boat for almost twenty years in and out of Texas. Cost him more than a grand to get out of it.

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rl,

Tell your friend that this is a case for a complete boat cover. One that will cover at least down to the water line. Also his major sponsor might foot the cost for needed licenses.

By the way does "Off and on again fulltimer" mean you still have a stick home but travel quite a lot?

Good luck and safe travels.

Herman

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Texas. Class B license if your over 26,001 and towing 10,000 pounds or less.

Class A license if your over 26,001 and towing 10,000 pounds or more.

This is for RV's per DMV web site in Austin. My renewal is in Feb. and I will get a AM (motorcycle endorsement) just in case I take all my toys with me!

Have a safe New Year and keep the rubber side down! :D

Carl C.

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Yes, the licensing for those with Texas driver's licenses is as Carl posted. This is for personal use, not commercial use.

But, rules governing commercial vehicles ARE different-- and suspect they are in other states as well.

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This is and always be a sore subject...most law enforcement do not know their own laws and will issue citations based off of their own interpretations. I strongly recommend seeking the information from the states official web site like Brett stated above. I recomend print it out and keep it with you...that doesnt mean argue with the law enforcement official asking for your license, sometimes you can have a discussion with them and maybe it will help.

One thing to keep in mind you can accidentally turn any RV into a "commercial vehicle" by federal terms by accident and not be aware of it just by simply using it for profit gain. rlbarkleyii nailed it with his friend who found this out the hard way with the trailer used for a craft show..."profit gain" will get you every time. you would have to prove it is not a business to a judge.

I had a friend have this happen to him with a horse trailer, they were headed back from a show after winning an award and some cash.... got stopped, cited, went to court and lost, license wasn't commercial, no medical card, no fuel tax sticker, no DOT numbers on the side of the coach and his regulator license was suspended for "operating a commercial vehicle with out proper licensing". The judge told him any profit gain or intent for profit gain landed him in all of this trouble, what a wake up call that was!

I have seen this get people into trouble pulling a travel trailer behind a company vehicle, even though the guy ownes his own plumbing business and left the door magnets on the truck, the truck GVW at 9900lbs and the trailer at 7000GVW totaled 16900 lbs (greated than 10000 = "Commercial Vehicle" NON CDL). Now comes the fines, no medical card, and no DOT numbers on the truck...oh yea federal law now...no alcohol is allowed to be transported in a CVM cab, OOPS the case of beer you just bought for camping just added another fine to the pile, I really stacks up quick.

Not knowing the law doesn't usually give you a break when you are standing in front of a judge, sometimes they will be forgiving but why risk it, if you are really not sure ask a lawyer to look into it, after all we just want to travel with as little or no headaches as possible.

Good luck and be safe.

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