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shortbus

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Mentioned my weather and climate interests in another post, was wondering if there are people with other similar interests such as geology, astronomy, general science & physics, survival, knives, cast iron cooking, grilling, robotics, photography and yoga? If anyone is interested I can give free or nearly free resources on any of the above subjects or just have a discussion.....or add your interests and accumulated knowledge......

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You will see a number of those items in my profile.  In addition to what I list, I have a background in the sciences and taught geology, astronomy, meteorology and oceanography (Earth Sciences) for many years.  I'm never happier than when I'm looking at a night sky, hiking a volcano, exploring some great erosion features like the Grand Canyon or Death Valley, or doing some nice snorkeling.  And yes, I take pictures of everything I see.  I also find yoga important for keeping flexible and my balance good so I can really enjoy those hikes. 

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Hey tbutler....

Spent a week or so at Mt Shasta and also went to Lava Beds NP. Black Butte (cinder cone) literally comes right up to the berm of I-5. Cant  believe they built it so close, one minor quake and the north bound lanes at least would be closed.... Left the coast this morning and after some time around the Columbia River heading north to St. Helens.

Yoga currently is for relearning to breath, copd.....

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We took our granddaughters to Lava Beds NP several years ago.  Hiked a number of the lava caves with them.  Last year we did Mt. Lassen and then Crater Lake with them.  It's been several years since Louise and I were at Mt. St. Helens.  The Lava Canyon Hike is spectacular, unknown to anyone until after the eruption cleared the forest in the area.  We had a real explore with Ape Cave (Boy Scout named it).  It's a long lava tube, about 1/2 mile is smooth bottom, lit and easy walk.  Backtracking uphill from the entrance it is about 2 miles, rough going over ceiling rockfalls, no lights, take a gas lantern and several other sources of light, all the usual cave precautions.  If you haven't been to the Columbia Gorge before, take the small road (Historic Columbia River Highway) on the south side of the gorge.  You will be treated to one waterfall after another.  Oneonta Gorge is spectacular.  You have to walk in the stream to get back to the waterfall.  Last time we were there you had to climb over a huge log jam to get into the gorge.  Well worth the effort but be ready to wade through waist deep water.  Several dams on the Columbia can be toured if you enjoy visiting them.  There are fish ladders, can't remember which dam but they have windows so you can watch the fish (salmon in the fall) on their way upstream.

Enjoy the trip.

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Bonneville dam, saw them swimming upstream yesterday, along with the lampreys. Stayed on I84 to keep moving. to get to the only campground that had a space along the Columbia and that is in Goldendale. Since we have already seen St. Helens and not wanting to backtrack a hundred miles to Portland, decided to head north from the Columbia to Yakima and then west to Mount Rainier. Seeing Mt Adams today. Wikipedia has an excellent article on the geology of the Pacific northwest. Figure Rainier has the most chance of erupting in our lifetimes so want to see it before (and if) it does. From there heading to Olympic National Park.

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Hope you get a nice clear day to view Mt. Ranier.  It's a beauty.  Any of the Cascades could erupt at any time.  The driving force is North America riding over the Pacific Ocean floor, melting it and it keeps popping up all along the western edge of the continent.  There was a book written in the late 70's, Fire and Ice.  It featured the eruption of Mt. Shasta describing all the effects that would happen if that volcano erupted.  It was a perfect description of what actually did happen at Mt. St. Helens.  Mt. Lassen was the last to erupt before Mt. St. Helens.  Mt. Ranier has been showing increased activity for many years now but it keeps settling down again.  One if these times it will break through.  It would be spectacular to see but not to have to live with, the whole Seattle area could take a huge hit when it finally does go. 

We spent the better part of a summer at Olympic National Park.  It is a magnificent area, amazing forests, many record trees (tallest or largest mass for their species).  There are spectacular trails and scenic overlooks.  Walking through the rain forest is an experience like no other.

The town of Forks has a logging museum.  They have tours of the logging industry, mill, logging operations in the field, etc.  It is well worth the time if you are interested in seeing how it all works today.  The mill has high tech operations, quite surprising for a facility that looks as rough as a saw mill.  Seeing the trees being felled and processed in the field was also quite amazing. 

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Take a ride up to Paradise, WA for a nice look at Mt. Rainer.

Tom, We were in Fort Lewis/McChord Joint Base for two weeks in August 2016

Wish we had known you were somewhere around.

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