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seboggs05

Portable Wireless Fence For Dogs

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We've been RVing for 3 years and our 3 Brussels Griffon dogs come along on each and every trip. For our first few trips we spent most of our time untangling leashes until we stumbled upon a portable wireless fence!!! Pet Safe makes a portable and adjustable wireless fence that works great for the RV: Pet Safe Portable Wireless Fence

The system takes less than 5 minutes to set up and our dogs are soon happily lounging in our campsite. We, of course, inform the camp hosts of our wireless fence and ask for their permission to use it instead of keeping the dogs on leads. Once we get to our site, we also tell all of our neighbors that the dogs are on a wireless fence so no one can misinterpret why are dogs are not on leashes.

At every campground (even up the Alcan highway) dog owners meander to our site once they hear we have a wireless fence to "check it out" and ask questions on ease of use, replacement parts, how to adjust the range, etc.

We have probably sent more than 100 dog owners to the nearest pet store to get a wireless fence for their RVs! We will continue to spread the word about this great product that unquestionably improves our furry family's RVing experience.

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Problem is, there is no wireless fence, short of one that will give a fatal shock, that will stop a terrier focused on some rabbit, squirrel, chipmunk, ... All senses seem to be completely over ridden by the instinct to hunt!

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Sadly a wireless fence may not keep a determined dog "in" and it sure won't keep any dogs out. Id never use one with my dogs at home or RV.

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While the merits of a wireless fence are many, I have to chuckle when I recall trying to retain my English Bulldogs inside a wireless fence. They quickly learned about the barriers, the beep warning, and the perimeter they could range, but my male soon discovered that the thick neck his breed is known for would also give him protection from the quick shock he got as he ran through the field of protection. He would race through it, then turn and look at me with that "now what?" look on his face. The female, being a bit smaller, stayed within the boundaries. :rolleyes::rolleyes:

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I would bet that effectiveness varies.

My understanding, from information provided by Leersburg, is theoretical. Dogs vary in how they react to negative stimuli and corrections.

Basically dogs have a temperament and a prey drive. Training and corrections vary dog to dog. Some dogs become very hard to deal with, for example, if a negative correction is applied.

I have a Boxer with a firm temperament and a strong prey drive. You can research this to learn more, but when his prey drive kicks in it takes much more effort on my part to get his attention so I can get him under control. He is seven months old now and I have trained him almost daily and when we are "outside" he is never off leash.

So, if I was considering such a fence at an RV park, it might work when he was relaxed and un-focused. If an animal or dog activated his prey drive, I'm guessing that most levels of shocks would be totally ignored by him. I'm not even sure that the higher levels of shock would work and he would simply crash through the barrier and continue onward.

I don't really know, but since I'm responsible for his behavior and I understand how strong his prey drive can be having raised him since 2 months old, I would not be pleased to take the risk of losing my dog or letting him get into trouble, which would include another dog breaking through the barrier. I do have a Marco Polo monitoring system I can use to radar locate him, but that is basically an emergency backup if he escaped confinement.

Having said all this, my dog is not aggressive, but he is over 50 pounds and I don't want him to have access to situations where he is without me or not on a leash.

When we are outside, I take full responsibility for protecting him from incompetent owners and out of control dogs.

Rodger

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Here are some comments from a mfg of a wireless fence.
"Doubled Effectiveness...The Best Friend Fence dog fence system keeps your pet safe because it restricts your pet's movement to dangerous places, and it also deters other animals (and even people) from entering your property and causing harm or damage. With Best Friend Fence, our simple instructions or professional installation options provide you with an effective and virtually invisible dog fence in no time. Accept no substitutes…Best Friend Fence Wireless Dog Fences will give you real property and furry friend protection, without the shock!"

Note the key words "doubled effectiveness" and "deters." That tells me that it is not going to work with firm temperament dogs and dogs with strong prey drives.

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Here is a Petco PetSafe Wireless Instant Fence product

  • Upon exiting the area, your pet receives a harmless but effective correction.

Key words are "upon exiting," meaning the dog may or may not respect the "fence" after he receives a correction. A dog that responds aggressively to a negative correction or has a firm temperament (as in saying is that the best you can do) will ignore the correction and be on his way.

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Comment from another website:

"The key is taking the time to train your pet. I have known of people to pay big money to install a fence, strap the collar on their dog and then complain that the fence is junk when the dog blows right through it."

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Comment from another website:

"We used one for our german shepherd. He figured out that if he sat near the fence while the collar wasn't in complete contact with his neck, he could run the battery dead. After it stopped making noise, he would escape."

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Comment from another website:

"Any of these are going to be completely ineffective in several ways.

First, they will not keep other dogs (or coyotes) from wandering onto your property and messing with, f*****g, or killing your dogs.

Second, they will not prevent the creepy kid from next door from wandering into your yard, poking one of your dogs with a stick repeatedly until it snaps at him, and getting sent to the ER while your dog is euthanized as a menace and you lose your homeowner's insurance forever.

They can also be ineffective in other ways. If the dog is strongly motivated to leave -- ie there's a *very* sexy b***h in heat nearby, or a yummy bunny is running away -- it can leave any time it's willing to get a zap in exchange for the goodie."

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Another comment

"My uncle had one for his dog, and it figured out that if it ran full speed, it could clear the fence. If he really wanted out of the yard, he'd take the hit, shake it off, and keep running.

Invisible fences, in general, can be effective for keeping dogs in, but their effectiveness will depend on the craftiness of your dogs."

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Another comment

"I have no experience as a customer of any invisible fence, but I can relate the following anecdote: someone in my neighborhood with a big corner lot set up an invisible fence to keep his two big (80+ lb) dogs in check. A couple months later, one of these dogs escaped and attacked a neighborhood kid.

That house is now surrounded by an 8' stockade fence."

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Another comment

"A friend of mine had a dog who decided that the freedom was worth the shock. He'd jump through, go hang out with his friends, wander the neighborhood - and then come home, sit down about 6" away from the invisible fence and bark until my friend came out, took off his collar and let him back in."

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​Last comment

"All of the dog-rescue folks I know hate those things with a passion, and have horror stories of dogs winding up in shelters, or dead on the side of the road, still wearing their shock collars. Smart dogs can and do figure out how to game the system, like odinsdream's GSD. More stoic or stubborn dogs can of course just run right through the shock if something sufficiently tempting wanders along...but the shock may then deter them from coming back home."

Rodger

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