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Women in Millitary Service to America

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To Seajay and all other Veterans;

I want to take a moment and raise your awareness of a tribute to women who are presently and have served this country in uniform in many roles and functions since the beginning of our history. I am a member of the organization named: Women in Military Service to America , which has a memorial at the Arlington National Cemetery. The Web Site is: http://www.womensmemorial.org/.

Its purpose is: "This web site is about the Women's Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery. The Women's Memorial is a unique, living memorial honoring all military women - past, present and future - and is the only major national memorial honoring women who have served in our nation's defense during all eras and in all services.

Work on the Memorial was in progress for about 11 years and it was dedicated October 18, 1997. Some 200,000 people visit the Memorial annually. We hope you'll visit, too, when you're in Washington, D.C.

This memorial has been privately funded since it's inception and this memorial was recently pulled back from the brink of closure by the generous gifts of more then 200 former military and civilian women who gave money so the memorial could continue. Anyone can visit the memorial and learn of the work and sacrifice of millions of women who have served this country, many with the same distinction as our male counterparts.

I hope all of you will add the Memorial to your itinerary if you travel to Washington, D.C., in the future. Any of you so inclined can go to the web site and donate using the link in the red banner at the top of the page.

I still hope other women who are or have served in any capacity join us on the Veterans forum and sound off on your contributions. If you are not aware of the Womens Memorial visit the web page and visit when you are in Washington, D.C.

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Guest Wayne77590

We visited the memorial this past year.

My wife and I are both married to Marines.

Thanks, Cathe.

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During my service in the USN, as a Hospital Corpsman, I served with many women at Naval Hospitals. They worked just as hard as their male counterparts, often harder, and served with honor and distinction. Today's military is vastly different, thank heaven, as it allows women to serve in many more job classifications than ever before. It's about time, in my opinion.

As I watched my grandson graduating from USAF boot camp this summer, one couldn't help but notice that his Company Commander was an E-8 Sgt., and a woman. There were about 20 companies graduating that day, and about 25 percent were led by women. The senior enlisted person in the recruit command was an E-9 Sgt., also a woman. Perhaps we have made some progress to equality and diversity after all. We still have a way to go.

My wife's cousin is a Major in that same USAF and she flys airplanes, big tankers and cargo planes. Women fly fighters and bombers. Women serve proudly and many have been injured and worse in service to our country. We need more monuments to their service, and we need to remember, as we approach the coming Veteran's Day, that their service and sacrifice have been no less than their male counterparts, and often gave the ultimate.

Cathe, I hope that your service, and that of all the other women who have served will always be remembered by a grateful nation.

I proudly salute and honor all of our service people, and pray that we will bring all of them back home soon.

Wind at your back and calm seas to all.

Doc Mike

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Better late than never ...............

Capt. Cathe, I too would like to personally thank you for your service to this nation and to the armed forces personnel you gave comfort to during your time in service .... So many times people seem to forget that women serve this country also. So many times in the past women have served in the ''background'' as it were and were seldom noticed by almost anyone until they came in on a Medivac with a leaking hole in them somewhere.

Like Doc Mike I am proud that our military is letting ladies serve in all capacities of our military forces now. When I was in the Navy, ladies were relegated to shore duty as mostly secretaries and nurses. It seems we have a different ''view'' of ladies now and that is good. Like Doc, I went down to San Antonio to watch a Airforce Graduation and we took my nephew up town for a celebration. Down town I noticed ''Sailors'' and about half of them were young ladies.

Anyhow,,,,,,,,, Welcome to Vets Corner and may other ladies join now that they see they have a Captain in here and she is the Ranking Officer in here and she can take command at any time......lol.....

Welcome aboard Captain........

God bless our vets for their service to this great nation

God bless our troops and bring them home safe and real soon

God bless this great nation and keep it free...

Seajay the sailor man .....

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We haven't been there yet but its on our list.

One of the overlooked groups of women who served during WWII were the WASPs. The Women's Airforce Service Pilots. They were never given military status and were dismissed at the end of the war. They never received any military benefits or recognition yet their service to the country was immeasurable. They didn't serve in combat, but they freed many pilots to serve instead of doing the routine flying they were assigned. These women flew almost every combat plane produced during WWII from the factory to their assigned units. Many of these flights were overseas. They flew the fighters, bombers and transports that the male pilots flew in combat. These brave women flew over 100,000 of these planes on their first extended flights, making them test pilots though they weren't called that. I'll be looking for some recognition of their contribution at the memorial. These were women who helped break down the barriers for the women who serve today.

Thanks for the note Capt. Cathe and thanks for your service.

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We haven't been there yet but its on our list.

One of the overlooked groups of women who served during WWII were the WASPs. The Women's Airforce Service Pilots. They were never given military status and were dismissed at the end of the war. They never received any military benefits or recognition yet their service to the country was immeasurable. They didn't serve in combat, but they freed many pilots to serve instead of doing the routine flying they were assigned. These women flew almost every combat plane produced during WWII from the factory to their assigned units. Many of these flights were overseas. They flew the fighters, bombers and transports that the male pilots flew in combat. These brave women flew over 100,000 of these planes on their first extended flights, making them test pilots though they weren't called that. I'll be looking for some recognition of their contribution at the memorial. These were women who helped break down the barriers for the women who serve today.

Thanks for the note Capt. Cathe and thanks for your service.

Please read the next Post for Info found at the webiste www.womensmemorial.org Women In Military Service for America.

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We haven't been there yet but its on our list.

One of the overlooked groups of women who served during WWII were the WASPs. The Women's Airforce Service Pilots. They were never given military status and were dismissed at the end of the war. They never received any military benefits or recognition yet their service to the country was immeasurable. They didn't serve in combat, but they freed many pilots to serve instead of doing the routine flying they were assigned. These women flew almost every combat plane produced during WWII from the factory to their assigned units. Many of these flights were overseas. They flew the fighters, bombers and transports that the male pilots flew in combat. These brave women flew over 100,000 of these planes on their first extended flights, making them test pilots though they weren't called that. I'll be looking for some recognition of their contribution at the memorial. These were women who helped break down the barriers for the women who serve today.

Thanks for the note Capt. Cathe and thanks for your service.

Please Note the WASPs recognition:

The first women in history to fly America’s military aircraft will be the first military women recipients of the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest civilian award presented by the US Congress. Three of World War II’s Women Air Force Service Pilots (WASP) joined President Obama and others at an Oval Office ceremony on July 1, as he signed into law S. 614, the bill awarding the medal to the WASP.

"The Women Airforce Service Pilots courageously answered their country’s call in a time of need while blazing a trail for the brave women who have given and continue to give so much in service to this nation since," said President Obama. "Every American should be grateful for their service, and I am honored to sign this bill to finally give them some of the hard-earned recognition they deserve." Created by the US Mint, the medal design will be unique to the WASP.

No date has been set for the actual award ceremony, which will likely be held in the US Capitol Rotunda.

1,102 World War II women wore WASP wings and flew over 60 million miles in 60,000 hours across the country for the war effort. WASP tested and ferried new airplanes and other planes after new or repaired parts were installed. They towed targets for antiaircraft gunnery practice, flew searchlight-tracking missions, simulated bombings and even instructed male cadets. While 38 lost their lives in service to the nation, the WASP were not granted veteran status until 1977. It is believed that there are some 300 remaining WASP.

We hope you will visit the special WASP exhibit,â€FlyGirls of World War II,†which is expected to be at the Women’s Memorial through the end of the year.

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My wife was in the USAF 24 yrs and retired as an E8. She had 7 combat tours, and was injured on her last tour. Due to her injuries she retired. Her last 13 yrs was in combat rescue.

She has never complained, and rarely talks about her service. We now have a daughter who is serving in Iraq.

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Guest Wayne77590

Badge,

Ask her to find another veteran who was there and talk about it. She will be amazed at how much it will relieve the mind.

Thank her for her service.

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