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eddy

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We have an M & G braking system installed on our 2012 Suburban.  The system uses the air brakes from the coach and is very effective.  We have been towing with a 2008 Holiday Rambler Ambassador with no issues.  Pros: Easy to hook and unhook.  Literally takes about 5-10 minutes!  Very effective braking especially when quick stops are needed!  About $3000 installed and that includes the Blue Ox tow bar and accessories.  Primary expense is for vehicle equipment: base plate, air cylinder to vehicle master cylinder.  Coach simply requires an air line and adapter be installed at the hitch.  We just traded coaches and the only expense was the installation of the air line.  

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We tow a 2012 Hondo CRV with our 1998 Tiffin Allegro Bus (DP) and I have a RoadMaster Invisibrake installed in the Honda CRV.  It is permanently  installed under the driver seat.  Works off of the brake light signal from the motothome, so is connected when the light is plugged in.  Has a lanyard which connects a safety breakaway switch to the motorhome, should the tow ever break loose the brakes are applied.  Really like the set up.

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We have always had diesel coaches.  Our braking system (Roadmaster's Brakemaster system) works off the coach air.  When brakes are applied in the coach, the air pressure line to the toad applies pressure via a air cylinder to the brake pedal in the toad.  The system is totally proportional (light braking in the coach causes light braking in the toad, ditto for hard braking).  Also, the brake in the toad will not be affected by using the engine brake on the diesel coach.  Inertial systems will activate when the engine brake is applied as anything that slows the toad will activate the inertial brake.  Adjusting an inertial system may help but if it completely avoids this you will likely lose much of the braking assistance the system can provide.  Having the brake in the toad on continuously while making a long downgrade descent will result in hot and worn brakes in the toad. 

Installation involves connecting the air line from coach to toad, snap connections at both ends, takes a minute or less.  We have to install the brake cylinder, a pin connects it to the mount installed on the floor under the drivers seat and the other end clamps onto the brake pedal.   The line from the brake cylinder to the incoming feed from the motor home is installed under the dash, another snap connection. 

We also have a break-away system which will apply the brakes if the toad happens to "take a left turn when we are making a right."  Having the toad roaming free is never a good thing.  There is a pressure storage cylinder (in the engine compartment of the toad) that will apply pressure to the brake in the toad if the break-away cable connecting the coach to the toad ever pulls the plug (a switch activator).  That is an additional piece of the Brakemaster system but I consider it a very necessary given that we are traveling on public roads with other traffic.  A free roaming toad will most likely destroy itself and may well destroy other property or kill other people.

We keep a tote bag in the toad with the break-away cable and air hose.  The six feet of cable and hose coil into a 12" x 1" space.  The brake cylinder is stored in a storage bag that came with it.  The cylinder assembly is about 18" x 3" overall.  Depending on our situation, these are either stored behind the drivers seat on the floor or if we are staying in an area for a while or may have passengers along, they will be behind the rear seat in the cargo area of our toad.

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Behind our  2016 Tiffin QBH, we tow a 2017 Toyota iM, w/standard transmission, with an "Air Force One" supplemental braking system, and a Brake-away switch. I installed the toad side of the system, and an RV service facility installed the coach side of the system. I would've installed the coach side if I had the room under the RV to work comfortably. This is a proportional braking system, and is operated by coach brake air pressure. Way more than happy with it. 

 

 

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I tow a 2014 Jeep Cherokee (4wheel drive with Active Drive II) behind my 2002 Fleetwood Discovery.  I use a Blue Ox tow bar system and I have been very happy with Blue Ox as I used the same tow bar to tow my previous jeep 2001 Grand Cherokee more than 90,000 miles with absolutely no trouble of any kind. I had an Air Force One installed on the toad and it works very well indeed. Once installed, it is very easy to set up and drive off.  Unfortunately, Jeep did not build the Cherokee very well.  There was an electrical harness that must be purchased to activate the electrical steering otherwise the front wheels wobble violently (the death wobble) under certain conditions.  Also, The front frame members to which the tow bar base plates attach are made of aluminum and mine broke all the welds after 39,000 miles of towing.  Everyone that tows a 2014 or newer Jeep Cherokee needs to have the dealer replace all the front frame members preferably at jeeps expense since it is supposed to be flat towable.  You can see pictures of mine on my facebook page of Gary Marsh.  I have had my jeep repaired and lo, all the replacement parts are steel so I will continue to tow it.

 

Gary Marsh   [email protected]

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I do notice that most cars I see towed are Jeeps.  is there a reason for this?  I am looking for a smaller car to tow and was wondering which works best towing behind a MH.  thanks 

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I flat tow a 2017 Equinox my previous tow car was a 2011 Equinox, highly recommended. As my motor

coach has air brakes I use a Roadmaster Brakemaster air cylinder with brake away,

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We tow a 2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee with our 2009 Gulf Stream Tourmaster Constellation 45g. We had a Blue Ox system installed on the jeep with SMI Air Force 1  air operated braking system. It was actually on a previous motorhome we owned. Have not had a problem of any kind. I had a Avail tow bar that broke , but I called Blue Ox and they had me send photos of the tow bar. Within 10 days FedEx dropped a new Avail tow bar off at the house. I had to package the old one up and send it back to the factory, they provide a RMA and prepaid shipping label. Thank you Blue Ox!

 

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We use USA Brake system in our 2012 GMC Terrain, hookup, place in neutral and pull one fuse..very easy. Some people have the system and the system is still available or parts can be purchased from a company in Arizona. Ask me I’ll tell you all about them.

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