Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Thanks for the various inputs. Thanks Brett for the specific responses. I think in my particular case, if I stick with 36-38 ft. I'll stick with gas. I expect to do more sitting than driving (snowbird type), however if I go larger, and start climbing a lot of mountains, I'd be better off with diesel. Sounds like the automotive diesel mfgrs. have dealt with the standard diesel problems. As I mentioned, my experience with recips has been mostly in the 2000 hp. range and turbines to 28000 hp!, so not really relevant to automotive.

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am considering the purchase of a 2011 Tiffin Allegro 34TGA on a Ford chassis. Am thinking someone out there owns one and would like to know any information they could give me. Do you like or dislike the unit and for what reasons, as I cannot find any reviews on it.

Thanks.

Chuck

I have a 2012 Tiffin 34 TGA I love the layout, and every thing about the coach except the shoddy craftsmanship. Unfortunately Tiffin seems to have no quality control, at all. I do like the power train. I live in Idaho, and have to do a lot of climbing both coming and going, and seem to have enough power. I tow a 2007 Jeep Liberty, which is just under 4K and I have no complaints about the power.

Dennis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are going from a 2012 Vista 35F with the Ford V-10 to the Phaeton DP. If the Ford got 7.5 towing our Jeep Wrangler I was lucky, mileage ran from 5.5 in mountains to almost 12 on downgrade and tailwind....

We switched to the Phaeton for the ride and amenities.....better mileage would be nice but really.

Who here really worries about it??? If you do, maybe you should not own a class A :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) I don't know how anyone could think there is going to be a "payback point" when talking RVs. I have proven on paper that for shorter 10-14 day trips it is cheaper to fly rent a car when you get there and stay in a nice hotel. But that is not what I want to do. I have done some mods on my coach because I wanted to do them not because of some mystical "payback".

2) Bless those who buy new-- without them there wouldn't be the nice coaches out there when I look for a different/ newer coach. When I was at Perry this spring my neighbor bought a new coach. When he drove off the fairgrounds he lost more money than I paid for my coach.

3) philand, BY the way welcome to the forum. The new electronic controlled diesel engines have few if any problems of yesterdays engines. The newer DEF engines actually seem to get a little more mileage/power than the afterburner engine. I think it is because they don't have to be dialed back as bad for emissions. I have a 2003 5.9 Cummins and have had no problem with low sulfur diesel nor have I heard from a reliable source anyone having a problem.

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't want to try to tell anyone which is best, gas or diesel, because I have never been a professional driver nor a professional maintenance person. I have driven my '99 Allegro Bay on a '98 Chevrolet chassis for more than 91,000 miles with no major chassis expense. I get an oil change every 5,000 miles at any local Chevy Dealer, usually for a cost of about $39.50. I took my RV to a Motor Home Service establishment one time and they charged me $97.00 for an oil change. I have driven my Chevy gas powered motor home over every mountain range in the eastern half of the USA, including the Rocky Mountains. We did not go up hill as fast as some diesels, maybe 35 MPH, but we got up one side and then down the other.

By the way, I have only one slide-out, in the living room area, and will never have more than one. If I ever buy another motor home, it will have to be special built with one slide out. In my opinion, two or more slide-outs, the second bathroom, the washer and dryer, the dishwasher, three or four TV sets, the sitting area in the bedroom, the double wide refrigerator, with icemaker, and all the other high-end luxuries, like Italian stone or fancy wood flooring, mirrors on the ceiling, lights mounted every place the manufacturers can find to mount one have ruined the motor home business for the average motor homer who likes to get away from home for awhile.

It seems that most people in the motor home world wants to take home with them when they go! All these fancy foo-foo items do is to use up weight that could be used to carry important items for every day living and cause more upkeep and expense for repairs in the future.

When I first bought my 36 foot Allegro Bay I had it weighed. It is rated for 26,000 pounds braking weight. Completely loaded with full water, propane and full gas tank, and with the Honda, the total highway weight, was 25,450. I had it weighed every year, for about 10 years and the total weight was always the same plus or minus a couple hundred pounds. At 65 MPH, I got 4.2 MPG. When I started driving 55 MPH, I got, and still get, 6.8 MPG, an increase of about 50%, and I add one quart of oil every 1,500 miles or so. Can you imagine driving 55 MPH for 91,000 miles? I did it and my wife and I enjoyed it! I don't know if a diesel would have been better or not...I just don't care...what I have is sufficient for me and my desire to enjoy life, not impress other people with what I drive!

When I was driving 65 MPH, I drove 6 to 10 hours a day almost every day and when we got to our overnight destination, my wife and I both felt, worn out, shook up and frazzled. At 55 MPH, we also started driving less per day, more like 4 to 6 hours, some days even less, like 80 to 180 miles, and we arrived relaxed and ready to enjoy something in the local area, like a movie, sightseeing or eating out. One of the main arguments for 55 MPH is that you always have an open lane in front of you, even in high-traffic conditions!

Say what you will, some people like gas and some people like diesels. No one in either group should belittle the other nor should they try to convince anyone of which is better.

Floyd Winfield

fewinfield96@hotmail.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you ask how much something costs you may not be able to afford it. Maintenance is going to be a wash over time, you need to ask yourself : what kind of trips will I take, lots of short trips or long trips, mountain of not, and for us the more important question that we asked ourselves was the floor plan, and as it turns out everything we thought we didn't want we got and love it.

2011 Fleetwood 42P

2015 Dodge 1500 4x4 Toad

Hydrolift w Harley limited Ultra

Oh and I get 6.9 -7.3 mpg avg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you ask how much something costs you may not be able to afford it. Maintenance is going to be a wash over time, you need to ask yourself : what kind of trips will I take, lots of short trips or long trips, mountain of not, and for us the more important question that we asked ourselves was the floor plan, and as it turns out everything we thought we didn't want we got and love it.

2011 Fleetwood 42P

2015 Dodge 1500 4x4 Toad

Hydrolift w Harley limited Ultra

Oh and I get 6.9 -7.3 mpg avg.

Thank you for your input but the OP probably has made his mind up as this thread is a year+ old. This is one of those questions that will come up almost as often as questions on fuel mileage.

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...