Jump to content

Recommended Posts

SAFETY FIRST, My wife and I were relaxing with some friends when I received a phone call from my daughter-inlaw. She usually calls to give us updates on how the grand kids are doing and asking us how our trip down south is going. By the tone of her voice I could tell this was different.

She asked when we were going to arrive in Palm Springs CA. and then proceeded to tell us that her uncle who had just purchased his dream RV, was on the roof, fell off onto the concrete and broke his back. Paralyzed from the chest down never to walk again,45yrs old. We were going to get together for dinner. The people we were sitting with in Yuma knew by my expression and tone that this wasn't the kind of news anyone wants to hear. I couldn't help but wonder what he must be thinking laying in bed in the hospital.

I worked for the Winnipeg Fire Department for 34 yrs. and took a few falls and broke a few bones and realize how lucky I have been.I have been on the roof of our motorhome too many times to count and thought to myself do we just get complacent and not realize how dangerous falling from 12 ft. can be. MAYBE WE SHOULD.

Please everyone, remember we are here for a good time not a long time.  

SAFETY FIRST.

Smokeater75

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear about the unfortunate accident hopefully he gets to the best doctors and gets the best possible rehabilitation.   Your story makes a good point about safety.  A number of years ago I had a friend who worked with me at the Police Department.   For a side job he worked at a funeral home when ever they needed him. To help him with hours the funeral director asked him to do some painting outside.   He was on a flat roof no more than 10 foot off the ground to paint a decorative railing where he must have tripped on the railing and fell of the roof.  Landed on his head and died of a depressed skull fracture.   Two years ago a retired co-worker was snowbirding in Florida while at the RV Park decided to clean the side of his coach.  Got up on the second rung of his ladder (no more than 2 feet) and fell.  Ended up with a compound fracture of this lower leg just above the ankle.   Was in the hospital in Florida, got out came home, did physical therapy at home and ended up getting an infection that lasted almost six months.  Safety First is something we all have to keep on remembering . . .    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Falls anywhere, anytime can be dangerous. My brother, at four years of age in 1954, fell on a wooden pencil that pierced his heart and lung. He died that day. Caution in all things when it comes to safety.

I only posted this because there are a bunch of us with children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren who should be cautious with what their offspring play with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, we can't prevent all accidents from happening.  What we can do as we grow older, is be aware off our surroundings and remember we are not spring chicks anymore!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smokeater75, sorry to hear of this, that's sad, he's my age, I can't imagine!

I can relate to your fire fighter experience. I was a volunteer firefighter from 1988-1996 fire police from 1996-2009. I fell through a floor and landed on my air pack in 1990, young and dumb I jumped up and shook it off, probably should have had it checked, never right after. Then fell off the roof at home (garage roof 9' up) in 2001, landed in a sitting position on top of the ladder, my left leg still has a knot of scar tissue and I think that was the final straw for my back, pretty sure I am running out of free passes from above. I am overly cautious now when climbing anything. Too bad I was a slow learner in my younger years :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smokeater --

Sorry to hear about the unfortunate incident.  Our prayers are with your daughter-in-law's family.

This topic raises a serious question of how to prevent a serious fall from the roof of a motorhome.  My employer has stringent fall protection requirements when working a heights above six feet which includes wearing a fall protection harness with the lanyard "tied-off" to a proper anchor.  Failure to follow my employer's fall protection requirements is cause for immediate termination.

Considering that motorhome roofs are 12-13 feet above the ground, has anyone ever considered wearing a fall protection harness and if answer is "yes", to what was the harness' lanyard attached?   If a fall protection harness is not worn, what others means can be used to prevent a fall from a motorhome roof?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking the same, in a controlled environment i.e. shop manufacturing plant it would be simple with overhead cable, however I can almost say this with certainty, no dealer/shop would ever make the investment for harnesses and the tie off running the building span, let alone keeping it current with compliance and certifications, RV manufacture I am guessing they are equipped, truck body companies are.

In your driveway or at a CG there is nothing up on the roof that wouldn't come off with you on the way down and would most likely create a tripping hazard while up on the roof. I usually crawl as my purpose is to inspect the roof with rubber/Kevlar gloves and sneakers on my feet for traction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/6/2017 at 1:48 PM, fagnaml said:

Considering that motorhome roofs are 12-13 feet above the ground, has anyone ever considered wearing a fall protection harness and if answer is "yes", to what was the harness' lanyard attached?   If a fall protection harness is not worn, what others means can be used to prevent a fall from a motorhome roof?

I have worn Fall Protection Harnesses.  I assume they are not cheap.  Some people have never seen one and would not know how to use it correctly without training.

I agree that there is nothing on a MH roof that was designed to hold the weight of most people especially with the momentum of someone falling off a 12-13ft MH.

A few things might have some benefit IMO.  If scaffolding could be put around the MH - at least a few sections where work was to be done might be helpful but it would depend on it being attached or secured to the MH enough so that it wouldn't fall over or pull away if you fell on it.  One other way that MIGHT be useful is IF you could park along side of a building were the roof was equal to or lower then the MH height.  It would of course only help one side and it would need to be a straight shot in to park along side of it so that no turning was needed that might cause tail swing to hit the building.    

One other thing has to be NOT going on to a MH roof if it is wet.  Very common in the morning if dew is present or if the humidity is high.

Falls are very dangerous.  Ever hear of someone stepping off a curb and breaking some bones?  It doesn't take much height.  Slipping on ice hurts too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fall protection is required by OSHA over 6 ft there are some exceptions with ladders I can't remember the details. When I worked for Amtrak we also had strict requirements on fall protection. They had a portable lift with a jib so when on top of cars you could hook up this could easily be used for an rv or truck. Not something Joe Sixpack would have hanging around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...