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romer1

Need front fender for 2000 Suncruiser

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On ‎5‎/‎16‎/‎2020 at 8:48 AM, romer1 said:

fender. Never even thought of using that for a mold. Thanks.

Just a little tip for using foam for a mold, cover the entire surface with Pam (cooking spray), then form Saran wrap over the surface, foam spray can now be shot directly onto the area, let dry, then remove the foam carefully. I've used plaster of paris and many other products, but the foam really works great.

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If you do a good job smoothing the saran wrap you can have a surface that needs little filing or sanding. 

Bill

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19 hours ago, Lcmcgee51 said:

Well were in the same boat . We need one also .

Sent you a message, contact me.

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Be sure to coat the saran wrap with the proper agent before applying the gel coat, then the epoxy after gel coat dries, work as many layers of fiberglass as needed, I usually use two, and of course epoxy between each layer then finish with last coat of epoxy. Saran wrap is only a name, you can get commercial wrap in much wider widths, usually find a place that wraps for shipping and most will give enough to do your job, be sure to use a cardboard core, or a large diameter pvc pipe to avoid unnecessary wrinkles for transportation.

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Well let's hope the OP has someone doing the work that knows what they are doing. 

I would use a good 17 oz Biaxial cloth or heavier and bag it. But I am not doing that kind of work any more.-_-

Bill

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Bill, I was in the cabinet business earlier in life, I did a lot of antique restoration back then. Many of the moldings on that fine furniture was unable to find a match, and next to impossible to duplicate because a lot of it was handcarved, that's when I decided to duplicate it. Lots of fond memories from those days, and I still like to do those things as a hobby. I have made doors for different motorhomes during restoration. As long as I can find a pattern I can still duplicate it. Yes 17 oz is best but harder to find unless there is a boat repair/maker shop near. Lowes and Home Depot in my area have 12 oz available, it works ok usually need a third layer for more strength on larger projects.

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46 minutes ago, kaypsmith said:

Bill, I was in the cabinet business earlier in life, I did a lot of antique restoration back then. Many of the moldings on that fine furniture was unable to find a match, and next to impossible to duplicate because a lot of it was handcarved, that's when I decided to duplicate it. Lots of fond memories from those days, and I still like to do those things as a hobby. I have made doors for different motorhomes during restoration. As long as I can find a pattern I can still duplicate it. Yes 17 oz is best but harder to find unless there is a boat repair/maker shop near. Lowes and Home Depot in my area have 12 oz available, it works ok usually need a third layer for more strength on larger projects.

Guess that means you can't do it off  a  drawing????

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On 5/15/2020 at 6:08 PM, hermanmullins said:

If it is covered by insurance why not find a shop to make the repairs and let them find a fender. It may take a week or several months but you can let them find one. I am sure the insurance company would be glad to work with a shop to save them from having to have one made.

If they have to make one make sure they keep the mold or pattern, you never know when you might clip another short post.:rolleyes:

Herman

Have you discussed this with your insurance company? What have they said?

Herman

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3 hours ago, hermanmullins said:

Have you discussed this with your insurance company? What have they said?

Herman

They're working with a company that does thermoforming, 3D printing and fiberglass work. It would help a lot if they had a fender to work with, but mine is only about a third of the fender.

Also have a Winnebago dealer working with his body shop.

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2 hours ago, romer1 said:

They're working with a company that does thermoforming, 3D printing and fiberglass work. It would help a lot if they had a fender to work with, but mine is only about a third of the fender.

Also have a Winnebago dealer working with his body shop.

Ok if you have a place that can do 3D printing they should have or have acess to a 3D scanner.  3D Laser Scanning is a non-contact, non-destructive technology that digitally captures the shape of physical objects using a line of laser light. 3D laser scanners create “point clouds” of data from the surface of an object. All you have to do is scan the left one and convert it in the computer to a right hand view. You realey wouldn't need a 3D printer to make a whole fender just print a 3D surface you could use to lay up a fiberglass fender. If you don't have a big enough printer make the mold in parts. A smart operator would build in tabs to locate and stabilize the parts when together. Then fill any cracks /seams so it takes less work when done.

Jim, with a good scanner you can duplicate the pattern down to imperfections in the grain.

Bill

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12 hours ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

Ok if you have a place that can do 3D printing they should have or have acess to a 3D scanner.  3D Laser Scanning is a non-contact, non-destructive technology that digitally captures the shape of physical objects using a line of laser light. 3D laser scanners create “point clouds” of data from the surface of an object. All you have to do is scan the left one and convert it in the computer to a right hand view. You realey wouldn't need a 3D printer to make a whole fender just print a 3D surface you could use to lay up a fiberglass fender. If you don't have a big enough printer make the mold in parts. A smart operator would build in tabs to locate and stabilize the parts when together. Then fill any cracks /seams so it takes less work when done.

Jim, with a good scanner you can duplicate the pattern down to imperfections in the grain.

Bill

Left one has a different shape due to driver door. Guess they could make any corrections though.

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