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rpbuttery

Inverter/Charging House Batteries

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This is a picture of my inverter right after starting the generator to recharge my house batteries, and both the air conditioners on, in my 2011 Allegro Open Road RED.

Generator is 8,000 watt, and inverter is a new (replacement) 2,500 watt.

Can someone interpret what the inverter read-out screen means, please?

IMG_8009.JPG

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Bulk rate is where charging starts, then proceeds to absorption and then float.

13.5 VDC is charge voltage. A little low. Verify set up programming.

Charge rate 86 amps.  So batteries pretty depleted.  Charge rate would be even more if voltage was up around 14.

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The display also indicated that the inverter is on, unless  the inverter light was flashing and you just captured the photo when it was lite.

 

Jim

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You can change the setting of when to charge the batteries. If you run on Inverter while traveling then set it to 60%, at that % the generator should come on and recharge the batteries to 100% then turn off,  

When I'm on shore power, I dial my Select to 5 amps...keeps the engine batteries happy.

Carl

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16 minutes ago, manholt said:

If you run on Inverter while traveling then set it to 60%, at that % the generator should come on and recharge the batteries to 100% then turn off,  

 

Carl

Not sure I understand.  While driving, the engine-driven alternator should take care of all but extremely large amp loads.  What are you running that would deplete the batteries while driving such that they would trigger the auto-gen set start? 

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rpbuttery,

The bulk charge is the mode the inverter/charger starts at, then to the absorption and then to the float mode. The display is giving the DC Charge voltage and current going to the coach battery bank and the Chassis batteries. There are different ways to wire the battery system that affects how the charging portion of the inverter reacts to the load.

The OP mentions a 8K generator running.

The charge rate is 86 Amps at 13.5 volts that equals 1160 Watts in the bulk mode. Unless the batteries are an issue that is not to far off from where the charge rate should drop to absorption point and the current should drop to around half that level.

There is no mention of how long the generator has been running, but it kind of sounds like the generator was just started manually.

The inverter LED is on and there is no way of knowing what the AC load is and the affect on the charging current, if the inverter is powering the kitchen and entertainment 120 volt circuits. This is a common setup. Is the Microwave operating? The OP also mentioned that both AC units are running.

We run our inverter at 100% because the DW runs some equipment that could be adversely affected by over or under the AC level of 120 volts.

Carl is correct that a charge level of 5 amps will do a good job of maintaining the battery levels with the inverter turned off.

The standard size of most engine Alternators is 160 amps, unless the coach has more coach batteries, 2 inverters and is an all electric unit. A 160 amp alternator putting out 13.5 volts produces around 2160 watts of power. Definitely enough to maintain the battery charge and run needed items when driving, unless there is an issue with batteries and or there terminal connections.

What is the Amp Hr. rating on the coach batteries and how many 6 volt batteries are installed. The Engine / chassis batteries fall into the Group 31 series and 2 in parallel is a common configuration. 

Rich.  

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Brett, I'm an all electric coach, so if I'm on dash AC, my fridge/freezer (Whrilpool) residential 23 cu. ft runs on inverter.  In Summer heat I run all 3 AC's and generator, in less than 70 degrees outside, I don't bother having the power on for fridge or freezer.

Rich.  8 AGM 6V for 2 Magnum 2,800 PSW. 

Carl

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I just had a fairly long conversation about my Magnum system.  The purpose of an inverter is to provide 110 volt power fom the 12 volt system.  If you are plugged in to 110 volt (30 amp or 50 amp) or on generator power, you do not need to have your inverter turned on.  Your 110 volt power is coming from shore line or generator.  

Depending on how many house batteries you have, your system (under setup) can be programmed for different time periods of charging.  When the voltage level drops to 12.6 volts the charger aspect of the inverter will begin to charge your house batteries. It will charge for the amount of time programmed and go through several different phases of charging depending on the condition of your batteries.  

The inverter does not need to be tuned for the charger aspect of it to function.  After the programmed time, it will stop charging.  If your batteries will not hold a charge, as mine were not, I had a "load test" performed on them and found a dead battery among them.  

Replaced that battery and have not had any charging issues.  The technical support department at Magnum Sine was very helpful and informative.  

Call them if you have any questions.  Their on hold time can be lengthy, I tried the"have them call me back" feature and found if I just stay on hold, I get helped faster that to use their call me back system.

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If anybody needs one, Magnum has an excellent manual.  It will explain what all the buttons do.  Call the 800 number and they will email you one.

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When plugged into shore / generator the automatic transfer switch inside the magnum allows power to flow thru. Inverter mode is not being used, even if the LED is on.

The only item accurate is what someone stated about Bulk, Absorption, Float. Now without the BMK kit, the current is a calculated value.

Your battery manufacture dictates the setting for the Charge Rate. My Interstate say 80% charger rate. It also states a higher float and absorption voltage.

Running A/C while charging does not make any difference in how the batteries are being charged. If your Alternator can charge the batteries, the generator will do it it's way. Again, without the BMK kit, the magnaum is/can only calculate what and how the batteries are being charged. Meaning it only sees what it is doings. It really does not see what the alternator is providing. With the BMK Kit, this allows the magnum to see what is going into and out of the batteries and calculate a true SOC. Meaning it takes into consideration you are using solar and engine to charge the batteries. The BMK also show the real current going into and out of the batteries. 

 

i have been using the magnum since 2013, 1600 watts of solar, and our alternator will help charge the batteries. 

One of the features of the Magnum along with the BMK, is will track total current in/out of the batteries. This is used to calculate the SOC.

You really need to read up on all 3 items, Magnum, BMK and remote to understand how well this system works

 

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