Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This last weekend an older 2000 something DP pusher heading up Mt Vernon Canyon out of the Denver area on I 70 caught fire. It burned to the ground as well the jeep being towed. This area is steep and the local temps have been pretty high, in the upper 80s and into the mid 90s. Suggest checking all cooling systems before heading up into the high country. 

We had friends come through over the 4th of July. He had a really trick FOAM fire suppression system aboard and into the engine compartment . It was an uncharged foam fire suppression system which he installed. Sensors in the compartment fire a CO2 charge to set it off. It has suppression and cooling effect. Nice and simple and not all that big either.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill,

Very familiar with fire suppression systems on boats. Fire when off-shore can be life threatening.

The good news on a boat is that the engine room is a reasonably sealed compartment, so fire suppression systems work well.

But in a motorhome, the whole underside and back/sides are open to the air, so displacing the Oxygen has limited value-- it is quickly replaced.  And, since many fires start while the vehicle is still moving, keeping Oxygen from returning is virtually impossible. 

I would love to see some scientific studies on this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brett --

Given your many years of experiences, I and I'm sure all forum members would like your "educated guesses" on what would cause a motorhome to catch fire while climbing I-70 out of Denver to the mountains.   I'd think if an engine overheated (at least a Cummins engine) that it would go into safety mode, slow down, etc.  I'm wondering if an electrical short (such as in the ATS if the generator was operating) or a refrigerator in propane mode would be the more likely cause of a fire.

Cleaning radiators and engine air charge coolers as you have coached us many times is now on my list of things to do each spring before hot summer weather arrives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This if off topic, but for the forum I recently learned a new meaning for "FIRE" that I hope to achieve in the next 2-3 years -- Financially Independent Retired Early.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, fagnaml said:

Brett --

Given your many years of experiences, I and I'm sure all forum members would like your "educated guesses" on what would cause a motorhome to catch fire while climbing I-70 out of Denver to the mountains.   I'd think if an engine overheated (at least a Cummins engine) that it would go into safety mode, slow down, etc.  I'm wondering if an electrical short (such as in the ATS if the generator was operating) or a refrigerator in propane mode would be the more likely cause of a fire.

Cleaning radiators and engine air charge coolers as you have coached us many times is now on my list of things to do each spring before hot summer weather arrives.

REALLY hard to venture a guess without FACTS.

But, would doubt that overheating would/could cause a fire.

Fires in the engine room are usually caused by fuel leaks or hydraulic fluid leaks. 

While cleaning CAC's/radiators is a critical part of motorhome maintenance, particularly on rear radiator models, I doubt that neglecting this would do more than just overheat the engine/cause engine to de-rate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've had six RVs, more than that in boats (gas and diesel), but the only time I had a problem with a fire was in an airplane.  I landed on fire...it was an electrical fire caused by the batteries.  So I keep a close eye on my RV batteries...you all will be happy to know that crash/rescue is really fast!:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×