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Cummins ISC 330 Exhaust Leak

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Yesterday morning the I heard a hiss when I accelerated only. When I got back home I inspected for a boost leak and exhaust leak. I didn't think it was a boost leak as the gauges show a good 30 psi when acceleration. I saw exhaust stain from the side of number three cylinder where the exhaust manifold bolt to the head. I was surprise because the exhaust manifold is a 2 piece design.

I sprayed with Deep Creep and loosen all bolts while engine was still warm. I run to Freightliner and picked up six multi-layer steel exhaust gasket. By time I get back the engine has cooled. I then removed all top bolts from manifold to head and screw them back in a few threads. After that I remove all of the bottom bolts. I then pried the manifold away from the head which gave me about 1/4 inch of space. I then removed one top bolt at a time, replace the gasket and threaded the top and bottom bolt a few threads until all was done.

I found one multi-layer steel gasket had split and another had a slot on number three cylinder. That was most likely the source of the hiss noise so I torqued the manifold down knowing I won't have to take the manifold off. Attached to that exhaust manifold is the turbocharger and to the turbocharge is the exhaust brake. This method saved me lots of money and time.

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Good job, Now the shop would have taken 6 hours and told you they had to drill our 10 bolts plus you need a new exhaust manifold. They would have also charged for shop supply's and probably for disposal of used shop supply's. :lol:

Bill

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Only advantage of pulling the whole manifold is to check it for warpage.

Agree, less likely with two piece/three piece manifolds than the old one piece ones. If it reoccurs, do check for warpage.

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Good job, Now the shop would have taken 6 hours and told you they had to drill our 10 bolts plus you need a new exhaust manifold. They would have also charged for shop supply's and probably for disposal of used shop supply's. :lol:

Bill

The Freightliner shop I take it to don't seem to do any repair work unless it cost over $1,000. It cost me $65 including tax for six gaskets. Oh and a few aches and pain from working over a step and a hole in the floor. :o

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Only advantage of pulling the whole manifold is to check it for warpage.

Agree, less likely with two piece/three piece manifolds than the old one piece ones. If it reoccurs, do check for warpage.

Yes this was a easy fix with 2 piece manifold that 10 years old and with nearly 48k on it. If it was a one piece manifold I would of sent it to a machine shop to have it resurface as number three is near the middle with no flexibility to torque it down.

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I'm dealing with the same issue on my old 6V92, hope it works out as easily as yours Ray.

Be glad it's not a marine engine that has water cooled exhaust manifolds.

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Good job on the repair. I too had the same issue and handled it the same way with an addition-- I had to remove the t-stat housing to get clearance for bolts on no 1 cyl. There were 4 gaskets cracked or missing chunks. I did replace all of the bolts since one was missing and several others were loose and I wanted to be able to get a proper torque.

Gary

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Ray.

Your coach is mad at you...it knows. No more trips from Island! <_<:(

Sorry, I just could not help it. You probably have more tools, than the average shop!

Carl

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Good job on the repair. I too had the same issue and handled it the same way with an addition-- I had to remove the t-stat housing to get clearance for bolts on no 1 cyl. There were 4 gaskets cracked or missing chunks. I did replace all of the bolts since one was missing and several others were loose and I wanted to be able to get a proper torque.

Gary

Yes number one cylinder was hardest on this one also. The top one interference from thermostat goose neck and the bottom one nearly impossible to get to and interference from alternator cables. I also remember to put anti-seize on the bolt threads. Only one gasket was cracked and missing a chunk here.

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Ray.

Your coach is mad at you...it knows. No more trips from Island! <_<:(

Sorry, I just could not help it. You probably have more tools, than the average shop!

Carl

Ha you know it that it has to have the last word. I also was spanked for saying the s word. As for tools, my extra set is going to be my extra set. I hope to put them to good use.

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I'm dealing with the same issue on my old 6V92, hope it works out as easily as yours Ray.

The 6v 92 in those coaches were generally easy to get at with the radiator side a bit tougher. The manifolds are one piece with a V-clamp on the pipe to the turbo and studs not bolts if I recall, been lots of years. They were also subject to warpage and cracking. They did have a thick metal/composite gasket so a little warpage was OK. Make sure all the old gasket is removed. The nuts and washers do not usually need to be fully unscrewed to be able to slide the manifold out and back in after the turbo pipe is out of the way.

Gary

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