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Davidnlyon

Penticton to Tucson

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We plan to travel from Penticton, BC to Tucson, Az in early January, 2019.  We are wondering if anyone has done that route with a coach that time of year.  We have a 40’ DP.

Thanks for any info you can provide.

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I travel that in mid March 

plan for possible wait time for the roads to be cleared and pack chains 

I run snow rated  drive tires and carry chains 

It is not fun in the snow but so far only one time dumped air in tag and prayed all was good on a long climb 

 

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You have received good advice from a fellow Canadian, I could reccoomrnd a lot of broken field running for your trip south to Tuscon. My goodness. Many different things could happen. Always loved the excitement of winter weather , but most amateurs , not so much. Good luck. Let common sense prevail. 

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We have a similar situation leaving from here in Colorado after the first of the year. We watch for a gap in the weather, check the roads and run like the dickens, South. If you go straight South, I 5 most of it should be ok. A few places could offer some excitement like over the Siskiyou Mountains between southern Oregon and Northern California. Most along that route the wait times are short and the snow melts quickly. Grew up in Medford, Oregon. As Byron suggested do not hurry and let common sense prevail.

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Thanks for the advice.  We are sort of debating just heading south, down through the Okanagan Valley, sticking to the route over from I-5.  However, it strikes us that there is probably a greater likelihood of snow that way.  The other alternative is to go over the Hope-Princeton to the coast, and then head down I-5.  We will need to get over toward I-5 at some point, because we are visiting people in Santa Cruz.

It may be that the Hope-Princeton is the best bet.  I have driven it in winter before, although nor in an RV.  As for the I-5 down to California, we have done that in early February towing a 35’ fifth wheel.  We stayed overnight in Weed, and woke up to fresh snow.  Since we are not planning to be in any hurry, keeping an eye on the weather makes a lot of sense.

We will do our homework on the likelihood of snow on the various routes, and make sure we are erring on the side of caution.

One question:  Does one just look for chains at camping world, or should we look somewhere else.  We have a Spartan chassis without a tag axle.  Sorry, I did think of another question.  We have arranged to have new tires installed before we go, Michelin XZA2 Energy tires.  The Michelin web site does not seem to include whether or not their tires are suitable for snow.  If anyone knows the answer, we would be grateful.

With luck, we will see some of you on the road, and have the chance to thank you in person.

David

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I just installed  Conti Hybrid HD3 with snow flake for drives this spring  

If you are willing to stop and camp till road is clear  not to worry

If you want chains try large truck dealers or truck tire shops 

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Triples are quite heavy and a little tough to manage when installing. A single on each end of the drive axle usually satisfies the authorities when the storm is winding down and the plows have done their work. Standard  Cable chains  usually are not  acceptable in tough states such as California. There is a heavier version that is acceptable. More $$ and harder to manage. In choke points where trucks stack up because of chain requirements, there are often " freelancers" that will install them for you for a price. They are dressed for the weather and know what they are doing. The chains come off easier than they go on. 

By the way/ I bought a set of triple chains from a truck stop at the absolute end of the snow season. Price was cheap and they were carried out by two employees and placed inside my trailer. They were glad to get rid of them, and  liuck would have it,  winter patterns changed somewhat. I never used them.

The best way to handle a pass requiring chains, is to stop well before and camp out at a truck stop. You will know when the best time IS to head on.

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June 19, 2019, we are going on a 61 day Fantasy Tour of the Maritime Province.  I have a friend in Newfoundland, that keeps reminding me, snow in July is not uncommon! That is the closest I'm going to get to Snow in a coach!  Been to Alaska, twice...no chains, yes, we had some snow, but we just sat around until it melted and moved on!

Byron.  Never thought about a "Truck Stop", but your right.  I'll keep that in mind.  :D

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I would like to see Newfoundland again. I was station there in 1957-58-59. I remember that the Roads around Argencia, Newfoundland were the pits. I couldn't imagine taking a motorhome or for that matter any kind of RV.

Argencia was the only area I was ever in. I never got to St. Johns or Gander. I bet a lot has changed in 60 years.

Herman

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Truck stops get crowded when a pass down the road has some version of a chain law in effect. To their credit, the officials involved in current chain requirements seem to use common sense. They ease up a bit when it is safe to use "some chains" to keep trucks moving. When it is really dangerous, they place requirements that are tough for most truckers to meet,(California) or they just shut the highway down.

If you find yourself in such a position, in an RV while trying to get south for winter relief or maybe to get home early for an unplanned event, listen to the CB some, check inside for updates, use the technology on a smart phone to check nearby conditions, and if things open up, get moving. You can take a nap later when you are past the problem. 

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Byron, all good advise! :)  In another life, I lived in Snowmas, CO. for 2 years and saw my fair share of OTR's in the ditch or way down the embankment in winter....I'm glad someone is tough when they need to be...it was not that way, in 1963! :wacko:

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