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SamJenkins1313

BF Goodrich, Continental vs. Michelin Tires

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My rig is a Tiffin Phaeton 40’,  2013 and I feel it’s probably time to consider new tires,  they are stamped “2612” !  I’m running 275/80 R22.5 XZA3+,  what’s the thoughts on switching to BF Goodrich or Continental ?  And which tire if switching ? ?  Thanks 

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I agree with desertdeals Toyos are a good tire. I just got 6, 245/75 22.5  Toyos from tires direct.   $1700.00 shipping was free.  I am lucky to have a friend that will mount and balance for me. I also ordered centramatics for steers

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DD69, has been complaint free on the beads for a year now...that's what I will get.

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8 hours ago, SamJenkins1313 said:

My rig is a Tiffin Phaeton 40’,  2013 and I feel it’s probably time to consider new tires,  they are stamped “2612” !  I’m running 275/80 R22.5 XZA3+,  what’s the thoughts on switching to BF Goodrich or Continental ?  And which tire if switching ? ?  Thanks 

I switched to Continental's last summer, 275/80 R22.5 load range H. Great tires and saved over $100.00 off the Michelin discount price.

Bill 

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Sam.

Due in part to the size of your tires and weight of your coach, use whatever you feel comfortable with!  My next set, will probably be Goodrich with the beads for balance!  My SO, Linda has a 2006 Phaeton 40 and she is putting on 6 Continentals next year! :) 

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We've only run two tires theGoodyear G70 motorhome specific tires and now the Michelins.

The Michelins are all ster tires on all positions. They have decoupling groves on side edges of threads.

Son't tend to river, or haven't so far.

We bought the last four through the Michelin FMCA discount program, in 2014.

Th Goodyears did at one time advertise  ten year life for the mh tire. Thee Michelins they told us only five but the sales rep before the mgr interrupted us and contradicted him said they should last ten years but that there is no lifetime specified for the tires now.

The steer tires were changed to Michelin steer axle tires in 2012 The Goodeyears were rivering badly. Not so with the rears.

We have steer tires on all positions, with the center tracking groove, and decoupling groovrs it helps steering and tracking some.

The ride with the Michelins is far improved over the Goodyears. Front tires only took one ounce on one rim and tire and none on the other, on a road force balancer.

These are the only two brands we have had experience with, so can't comment on others. A motorhome specific tire will ride better and last longer than a semi tire, in a much lighter weight, generally, motorhome. The few big rigs have to replace stter tires each year so the difference might go the other way. imo

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TT.  Bottom line is, the sidewalls, will show cracks and spider webs, long before the tread wear show.  Most all of us will change out all or some after 5-7 years!  Therefor a 10 year warranty to me = zip!

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On 3/7/2018 at 7:25 PM, manholt said:

TT.  Bottom line is, the sidewalls, will show cracks and spider webs, long before the tread wear show.  Most all of us will change out all or some after 5-7 years!  Therefor a 10 year warranty to me = zip!

That is what has me concerned about the Michelins, but the coach is stored inside out o the sun and off unfinished concrete etc that will wick oils out of tires.

The G670s were 10 years old when they were pulled off. I kick myself thinking about it.

The rubber was supple and live as the day they were made and no spider webbing or cracks or anything and nearly 100% of tread.

They were intended for long life on a mh with lots of uv protection etc. MHs are not driven as much as a semi and the elements, not wear is what gets them.

Dirt and  lime dust and mud and salt will suck the oils out of tires like a wick. Cleaning both sides of duals , and inside of steers is a challenge. Best I can do is a high pressure hose  but done every time you wash it I think helps.

This is one reason I favor paved RV parking slots and roads. Tires and the whole coach stay cleaner. I hate a  dirt on our coach.

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Not  found of dirt either!  The one thought you forgot about, is the inside of the tire, that we can't see!  I will not bet the life of my loved ones or myself on a 10 year old tire!  All my used tires goes to a friend, who use them on hay trailers, that never see the public roads! 

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I am also due to change out my g670 tires on a Monaco 40-footer. On all four corners I'm running within 10%-15% of load limits. I would like to move from the 275 80r to the 295 80r. Can I mount these wider tires on the same rim? Staying in load range H the 295 provide about 700 more pounds of load carrying capacity. I like having a little more breathing room in my normal carry weight to maximum capacity.

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4 hours ago, WILDEBILL308 said:

Welcome to the forum.

You will be a little larger. You can compare size with a tool like this. Are you running LR G or H now?

 https://tiresize.com/comparison/

I went from 255/80R 22.5 to 275/80R 22.5 and picked up a 6.6% overdrive. B)

Bill

The 275 is load range H @ 7160lb

The 295 is load range H also @

7830 lbs. 

I would like that little extra cushion as I'm within 10 or 15% of Maximum now.

The question is will the 295 tires fit on the same Rim as a 275.?

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Cdriffter99.  Welcome. 

There are other factors involved, besides rim size.  Is there enough distance between the 2 tires on the drive axle, so they don't rub against each other, when rolling?  As for fitting on the rims you got, I don't see why not.

You will have to set your odometer for the 295's and you will loss mpg, due to the increased weight of the tires...each 295/80 weight more than the 275/80!

I went from 295/80R to 315/80R in front only and lost 1/2mpg!

Your GVWR should stay within the parameters set by the chassis manufacturer...in other words, don't try to change the weight limits, that are listed. 

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Just a reminder, just because you increase your tire rating doesn't mean anything if your axle rating is near capacity. It is like a person that replaced their 5000# hitch with a10000# hitch thinking that would solve their issue of hauling a 9000# trailer. That didn't work out so well for them.👎🙄

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Back when I started driving it was quite common to order a car instead of buying one off the lot. I remember my father sitting and going through the various option groups on the 'menu' of available choices. One of those option groups was for towing and another for performance. It was possible to have the car ordered with special tires/wheels directly from the manufacturer to meet certain goals such as towing or going fast.

When a customer selected tires different from the 'standard' tire, there were other (usually not seen) options that were required to make them play nice with other components. Different gauges to adjust for different tire diameter, heavy-duty rear axle, different suspension components to carry the extra weight, etc, etc.

What I'm trying to say is that there is much, much more involved in the selection of tire sizes than just getting the largest size which will fit in the opening. What will be the result of larger tires in all possible scenarios is not always evident. What will happen if one of the air bags fail and the vehicle drop? Would be a shocker if the tire hit the upper side of the wheel well and damaged something. Will you require taller frame bumpers? How will it affect handling? What will be the consequence on other components of the extra unsprung weight?

In my opinion, I'd stick with the tire size that the manufacturer recommends. If it's not on the placard or in the manual as an optional size, then I'd stay away from the change. There are many calculations involved, and I have to assume that the engineers designing a vehicle did the math when they selected the tire size on the vehicle.

All that said, the earlier comment regarding load capacity is spot on. Merely increasing the load capacity of tires doesn't automatically increase the vehicle's load rating. Probably won't affect it at all, since the load rating is based on many components and system such as axles, brakes, steering, etc.

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True, very true!  As also applied to my Jeep Wrangler conversion, from basic to now, with 35'x12.50 tires=$2,000, but to have and use them=$14,000!

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On 3/10/2018 at 7:58 AM, richard5933 said:

Back when I started driving it was quite common to order a car instead of buying one off the lot. I remember my father sitting and going through the various option groups on the 'menu' of available choices. One of those option groups was for towing and another for performance. It was possible to have the car ordered with special tires/wheels directly from the manufacturer to meet certain goals such as towing or going fast.

When a customer selected tires different from the 'standard' tire, there were other (usually not seen) options that were required to make them play nice with other components. Different gauges to adjust for different tire diameter, heavy-duty rear axle, different suspension components to carry the extra weight, etc, etc.

What I'm trying to say is that there is much, much more involved in the selection of tire sizes than just getting the largest size which will fit in the opening. What will be the result of larger tires in all possible scenarios is not always evident. What will happen if one of the air bags fail and the vehicle drop? Would be a shocker if the tire hit the upper side of the wheel well and damaged something. Will you require taller frame bumpers? How will it affect handling? What will be the consequence on other components of the extra unsprung weight?

In my opinion, I'd stick with the tire size that the manufacturer recommends. If it's not on the placard or in the manual as an optional size, then I'd stay away from the change. There are many calculations involved, and I have to assume that the engineers designing a vehicle did the math when they selected the tire size on the vehicle.

All that said, the earlier comment regarding load capacity is spot on. Merely increasing the load capacity of tires doesn't automatically increase the vehicle's load rating. Probably won't affect it at all, since the load rating is based on many components and system such as axles, brakes, steering, etc.

Hi there.... I am replacing my Good Year tires 295 Front 275 rear with Michelins next week. But my regular service guy is recommending same size all around. I have yet to find any information that supports or refutes this idea? Any thoughts?  Thanks...

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On 3/9/2018 at 9:24 PM, Cdrifter99 said:

I am also due to change out my g670 tires on a Monaco 40-footer. On all four corners I'm running within 10%-15% of load limits. I would like to move from the 275 80r to the 295 80r. Can I mount these wider tires on the same rim? Staying in load range H the 295 provide about 700 more pounds of load carrying capacity. I like having a little more breathing room in my normal carry weight to maximum capacity.

I am also changing my Goodyear 670s to Michelins next week. I currently have 295 on front and 275 on the rest. My regular service guy recommends same size all around? Any thought on that.  Thanks...Mark

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Sutcliffe. Welcome!

One answer will suffice.  As to your Question.  The best is to roll with the same size tire, that came with your coach, from the manufacturer!  You'll find that info on your weight placard..normaly in back or side of driver seat, on wall.  Some factories put it on wall in closet rear!

Carl 

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On 3/9/2018 at 10:15 PM, WILDEBILL308 said:

Welcome to the forum.

You will be a little larger. You can compare size with a tool like this. Are you running LR G or H now?

 https://tiresize.com/comparison/

I went from 255/80R 22.5 to 275/80R 22.5 and picked up a 6.6% overdrive. B)

Bill

I prefer to use the dimensions published by the tire mfg for the tires I am considering. The "comparison" website is theoretical dimensions based on numerical tire sizing.

Bet the website gives identical dimensions for all brands of tires but the data sheets do have some minor differences.

 

Links to different mfg Load & Infl tables and other data can be found HERE.

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