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richard5933

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    Beautiful Southern Wisconsin
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    Part-time

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  1. Interesting test. Would like to see more RV manufacturers doing that with various models, including some of the low-end Class A rigs. A rollover test might be more real-world though, something like this: I've been on these buses overseas - they are pretty stout and seemed much better made than some of the ones we're used to. Curious to see how a low priced Class A would hold up in a test like this.
  2. Just checked the FMCA store on the website and don't see an option for ordering the molded plates. Do you have a link to it or is it no longer available?
  3. Get a controller with more capacity than you think you need now, both in terms of voltage and amperage. This will give you room to grow as things change in the coming years. Would really be disappointing to decide to upgrade your panels in a couple of years when some newer/better/cheaper technology comes along, only to find out your controller is already at its capacity. Much cheaper to upsize now than wait till later.
  4. Generally speaking, I was referring to the area of your coach where the holding tanks and associated plumbing are located. Every coach has an area - some are distinct bays and some are just a section of another bay. Some smaller coaches put the 'wet bay' under the dinette or under a bed. My basic point is that where ever your holding tanks are located, as well as your plumbing, needs to be checked if you're heading out into potential cold weather. What you're looking for is whether or not it's set up in a way which will protect the tanks and plumbing from the cold temps. Some coaches are true 4-season coaches and have heated tanks and protected plumbing, and some are quite the opposite with everything exposed to the elements under the coach with perhaps only a thin plastic guard. Camping in November in the mountains can be quite enjoyable, but if you are looking for fall color pick your destination according to the various sites which predict peak color. There can be quite a variance from one area to the other, and if you pick wisely you might find a location with good color still in November.
  5. Can't guarantee it, but it's unlikely that you'll encounter snow or salted roads if you head out in October to see leaves change color. Possibly if you are at some higher elevations, but for us here in Southern Wisconsin peak leaf color comes way before the snow. Have we ever had snow before Halloween? Sure, but it's not usually the case. There are also some great color displays along the east coast forest areas in the fall. Here's just one of the many websites that help you find peak color: https://blueridgemountainlife.com/fall-foliage/ Sounds like they are predicting peak color to be in October, with the colors fading to brown by the time you are considering just before Thanksgiving. Freezing weather? That's lots more likely than snow. We're in northern Indiana this weekend, and the temp is going to be in the upper 30s tonight. With the heat in the coach running and the water heater warm, we are good to go until temps get into the upper 20s. At that point we'll have to turn on the heater in the wet bay. I'd suspect that your coach can withstand temps in the upper 20s without any problems or freezing pipes. Hopefully someone with your particular model will join the conversation and help more. Do you have heat in your wet bay? If not, do you have an electric outlet in there where you can plug in a small heater? We love travel in the fall and spring. So nice to not have to have the a/c running all the time. The campgrounds are more quiet, and the cool nights are great for campfires.
  6. Wild pigs are considered a game animal in California - not sure where you're getting that they are protected. You need a hunting license, but apparently there is no bag limit for pigs killed on your own property.
  7. Considering the amount of rodents they can consume, snakes aren't all bad. It's not all types of rattlesnakes that are protected, generally it's the one on the endangered species list. I did a quick Google Search on this one and it looks like every state has their own rules on snakes.
  8. Have you tried a local glass place that does residential shower enclosures? They should have lots of catalogues of things like that.
  9. My understanding is that a tire with a higher load range has a stiffer/beefier sidewall. One would think that it results in a harsher ride. But, in many cases you can use a lower pressure in the tires with a higher load rating which counters the harsher ride. I recently switched from 315s on our coach with load range L to 12R22.5 with a load range H. My initial thought was that perhaps the ride would be softer, but then in the end I run at slightly higher pressures and the ride in not any different than before. This is my experience, and I'm sure others will have a different take on things. Have you compared the air pressure which will be required in the new tires vs. what you run in your current tires? I'm guessing that it will be slightly lower and might counteract the slightly stiffer tires.
  10. That's about what I paid for mounting and balancing. About the tire models, download the Hankook tire book from their website. It will be the definitive guide to the various sizes and load ratings available.
  11. Are you thinking of the Motor Carrier's Atlas? Best reference I've seen for big rigs, but has nothing specific to RVs. Great for things like weight and height restrictions.
  12. Good to remember that some campgrounds printed their advertising literature decades ago and are still using the original batch. When a campground said it was 'big-rig friendly" 40 years ago, things were decidedly different than today. Always good to check if you have a "big rig". Even with our 35-foot coach, there have been some really tight places which claimed to be "big rig friendly".
  13. If they are pulling the wheels off, always nice to have an inspection done on the brakes.
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