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templeandgary

Dual Wheel Equalizer

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First I apologize if this topic has been covered but I searched and didn't see anything. My question is about Dual Rear Wheel equalizer systems for valve stems. I have seen these available from a couple different manufactures and was wondering if there were any opinions on these.  Are they worth it?  Do they work well?  If they are worth it is there a particular brand recommended?  It seems to me to make sense to have only one valve stem to inflate both tires and maintaining equal pressure between the tires also seems like a no brainer but I thought i would look for some opinions before I made any purchases.  I also run a TPMS sensor system on my rig and currently only have 6 sensors, I put them on the front and drive wheels but need to buy two for the tag, if I run one of the equalizer systems it seems that I will only need 6 sensors so I will save a little on sensors if I get one of these equalizer set-ups.

Thanks in advance for any advise.

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Personally I am not a fan of ANY braided hose connections on dual wheels. Crossfire http://www.dualdynamics.com/products/cross-fire/ seems to be a good one that I have commonly seen on trucks and I do like the pressure display on the window, you would get the same thing with a TPMS system, just on the dash.

It does have some safety benefits built in but I would prefer a sensor for each wheel and solid stainless steel valve stem extensions on the rear inner duels. The reason I prefer a sensor on each wheel, temperature and pressure will be more accurate, if I have a slow leak narrowing it down to a specific wheel would be much easier with a TPMS sensor on each wheel.

I have had a bad experience with the hoses chaffing on the wheel opening's in the past that left me on the side of the road making a repair. While the wheel is in motion and hitting bumps those hoses are all over the place and could be making contact with something that could weaken or damage them. 

After many different systems over the years I gave this one a try and love it! Works flawlessly, no need for a repeater on a large coach either if you want to include the Toad (which is a good idea).

https://eezrvproducts.com/shop?olsPage=t%2Ftire-pressure-monitoring-system-tpms

 

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Templeandgary.

It would be nice to know if you have a computer system like Aladin or Silverleaf...I have the later &  mine is set for Pressure Pro.  Tried Joe's system and I would need a separate display! 

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I'd agree that using a separate TPMS sensor on each wheel is ideal. If a tire is getting low, I want to know which one. Also, if I understand the way the equalizers work they'll double the time it takes for you to receive an alert from your TPMS. Mine is set to sound an alert when the pressure drops a set amount in a certain length of time. If both tires are joined together, a slow leak in one will be mitigated by the other tire and result in the alert sounding later.

When I had our previous coach with Alcoa aluminum wheels on the outer duals, it was really tough to get a tire gauge or TMPS sensor on the inner tire. I took it to a commercial tire shop and had them reconfigure the valve stems to make it work better. They were able to carefully bend mine into a good position using a tool they had, but I imagine if necessary they could have change the valve stem to one better suited to what I needed.

There is a special tool which can be used to remove the valve stem caps from the inner tires through the hole in the outer wheel. If I still had that coach with the Alcoa I'd be trying to make a similar tool dedicated to installing/removing the TMPS sensors on the inner wheels. Fortunately our current coach has openings large enough for my hand to fit through to reach the inner valve stems directly.

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I understand the concept of the systems that "balance" the inflation on a set of duals. As a tire design engineer, I also know that proper inflation is important however I am not aware of any controlled testing that shows any advantage for better durability if the tires are linked so that the air pressure is constantly matched.

I note that some have posted that they use TPMS which is a very good thing to do. If you are attaching a TPM sensor to one of these systems you do need to pay attention to the low-pressure warning as the "sharing" of air might delay the warning of air loss being made to the driver.

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My understanding of Cats Eye and other such systems is they only equalize when adding air, but when one tire loses air it does not draw air from the other dual tire. Were it not for the chafing issue I would have installed one of these systems.

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On 7/1/2019 at 7:42 PM, richard5933 said:

I'd agree that using a separate TPMS sensor on each wheel is ideal. If a tire is getting low, I want to know which one. Also, if I understand the way the equalizers work they'll double the time it takes for you to receive an alert from your TPMS. Mine is set to sound an alert when the pressure drops a set amount in a certain length of time. If both tires are joined together, a slow leak in one will be mitigated by the other tire and result in the alert sounding later.

When I had our previous coach with Alcoa aluminum wheels on the outer duals, it was really tough to get a tire gauge or TMPS sensor on the inner tire. I took it to a commercial tire shop and had them reconfigure the valve stems to make it work better. They were able to carefully bend mine into a good position using a tool they had, but I imagine if necessary they could have change the valve stem to one better suited to what I needed.

There is a special tool which can be used to remove the valve stem caps from the inner tires through the hole in the outer wheel. If I still had that coach with the Alcoa I'd be trying to make a similar tool dedicated to installing/removing the TMPS sensors on the inner wheels. Fortunately our current coach has openings large enough for my hand to fit through to reach the inner valve stems directly.

Richard, I solved that TPMS removal/installation problem on my Alcoa rims. I bought a foot of 1" heater hose, pushed it over the TPMS and unscrewed it, re-installed it the same way. One caveat, take care not to over-tighten The TPMS. My first time, I did over-tighten it and broke the brass fitting out of the plastic housing.

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47 minutes ago, RayIN said:

Richard, I solved that TPMS removal/installation problem on my Alcoa rims. I bought a foot of 1" heater hose, pushed it over the TPMS and unscrewed it, re-installed it the same way. One caveat, take care not to over-tighten The TPMS. My first time, I did over-tighten it and broke the brass fitting out of the plastic housing.

That's similar to the tool I used for the valve stem caps. Sometimes you just have to make your own. I hadn't thought of using heater hose, but I might have to try that on mine to save from sticking my arm through all that mess to get the TMPS off. Maybe bond a short piece of heater hose to the end of a length of 1" dowel.

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