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richard5933

Shutterstat Fluid

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2 hours ago, wildebill308 said:

Seriously? I sent you a link above with some for sale.

Bill

That link led to an ad from 2018. It was marked as sold in Feb. 2018.

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2 hours ago, rayin said:

Richard, have you visited this website yet? There is a contact listed for a Kysor engineer, but that thread is from 2005.

Yeah - I posted on there about a year ago. Didn't get a definitive answer, just a suggestion to use ATF.

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On 11/7/2020 at 7:51 PM, rayin said:

Ford Focus and Ram truck use a Kysor radiator shutter. Don't know more though, probably electric today.

I have a Ram truck and it's shutter is  electrically closed only in cold weather.  The purpose is to speed up the warming of the transmission then the shutter opens afterwards.   

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Richard, time to cut the can open and get all the scrapings you can, send it in for analysis.

Kano KRoil, machine oil, Casteroil 880.

Edited by manholt

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Got some Marvel Mystery Oil Air Tool Oil today - it's now the top contender. It has a very thin consistency, and there is a faint hint of dry cleaning fluid odor mixed into the oil. I am running a test to see how well it wicks. I've got a spare Kysor airline filter/oiler, so if it looks to wick well I will put some of this oil in there and see how much oil gets picked up by the air as it moves through.

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Brief project update...

Found some Shutterstat Fluid - sealed can never used. The oil inside seems to be good and not gummed up. I was expecting an odd smell since it has a solvent content, but didn't expect that smell to be mildly similar to the smell of Windex. The closest thing I've found to it so far was Marvel Mystery Pneumatic Tool Oil. I'll run some side-by-side wicking tests to see how they compare.

The airline filter/oiler on my bus has been on there unopened for 46 years. On initial inspection the screws and fittings seem pretty well stuck and not keen to move. So, when I saw the NOS filter/oiler come up on eBay I got it just in case.

The air cylinder rebuild kit was ordered through Ross Air Works, and the Shutterstat itself was bought from C&J in Minnesota. I'll probably replace the air lines themselves if there is any sign of dryness or cracking when I get things opened up.

The shutters themselves move freely. I've been keeping them lubricated and have moved them manually a few times a year hoping to get them working at some point.

Seems like I've got everything in place now to get the shutters working again. Probably won't get to it till I start working on the bus in the early spring, but it's nice to be able to find all the parts and supplies needed.

For those curious as to why? Simple, because I can.

20201127_143819.thumb.jpg.61e4cda5217133fdfbfe20f23a9dc2ce.jpg

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Richard, we think alike. Everything on our coach has to work even if I don’t use it. I could see you actually needing it to help maintain even temperatures. 
 

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2 hours ago, jleamont said:

Richard, we think alike. Everything on our coach has to work even if I don’t use it. I could see you actually needing it to help maintain even temperatures. 
 

Actually, in doing some research it seems that the shutters aid in fuel efficiency as well as keeping the engine at the proper temp. The HP needed for the fan to spin with shutters closed is much less than when they're pulling air through, so having them close when cooling is not needed helps in that regard.

In spring and fall, it's not uncommon for my engine to operate below 190 degrees for quite a while, even going down the highway. The shutters will help keep the engine as near to peak temp as possible. The shutters and coolant thermostat are designed to operate as a system, and when only half the system is operating there's no way it can be at its best.

Besides, I do like having things work the way they're supposed to. I get a thrill out of seeing the old technology still doing its thing.

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Ray, you can't keep up with high tech, it's old before you can buy it.  In Richards case, he's trying, and doing a remarkable job, to keep an old Classic coach running according to the original tech and spec's!  Not an easy feat in today's world. :) 

Richard, you need to convert the old barn to a indoor workshop & bus garage, ASAP....not getting any younger!

Joe, Yup, I too hate it when it don't.

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9 hours ago, rayin said:

And without  computers!  It annoys me when something doesn't work as designed.

When people ask where the coach's computer module is, I like to point to the large box on the firewall over the engine where the wiring & controls are. We have about a dozen large relays in there, and they are essentially the only "computer" in the works. Kind of looks like a miniature ENIAC machine, and it performs lots of yes/no functions at start-up to get all the systems up and running. If things go wrong, it also serves to shut things down. Simplicity at its finest. When compared side-by-side with an MCI of the same era, GM definitely took the road less complicated to get to the same place with many of the systems. I like that.

Carl - The barn improvements are just a lottery ticket away. Now if only I could find the right lottery ticket.

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Richard, in 1973 to 1978 GMC was building their own motorhome, chassis and suspension system, GM was way ahead of its time!!!  There was over 12,900 units built from 22' to 28', engine was a 455 V8 Olds Rocket, coupled to a 3 speed automatic...its estimated that 8,000+ are still running today and of those 7,000 are registered today internationally!  So, yeah, you have a good pedigree!

If you won the lottery, you would probably have a garage/workshop that would make Joe, green with envy!

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Some did had Olds Toronado engines mounted crosswise vs the length. I had a call a few years ago from a member in Lancing, MI that had a new one in a crate to sell. Put him in contact with chapter president of GL GMCers. Bet it didn’t last long. 

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The GMC motorhomes used the front-wheel-drive driveline from the Toronado, but I believe in later years they were using the less expensive Chevy engines as well. Not sure which one. Olds used to make their own engines, and they were great engines for sure. Don't think I've ever seen one from the factory with a diesel, so that must be an aftermarket mod. All of them had transverse-mounted engines, which coincidentally my coach has as well.

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20 hours ago, manholt said:

Ray, you can't keep up with high tech, it's old before you can buy it.  In Richards case, he's trying, and doing a remarkable job, to keep an old Classic coach running according to the original tech and spec's!  Not an easy feat in today's world. :) 

Richard, you need to convert the old barn to a indoor workshop & bus garage, ASAP....not getting any younger!

Joe, Yup, I too hate it when it don't.

You're right on that! I have a 1932 Chevrolet Confederate BA sedan that requires a lot of attention. Luckily for me there is an internet network of antique Chevrolet NOS and replacement parts suppliers.

This winter I intend to refocus on the old car.

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